• Senate report offers valuable roadmap to tackling court delays

    “Delaying Justice is Denying Justice” makes 50 recommendations for how to address the crisis… governments would be better served tackling the roots of the crisis… introducing technologies “that facilitate cooperation, permit increased information sharing and improve efficiency.”… that judges be given better training on case management… [and that] incarceration should be a last resort and that less punitive and costly alternatives should be given priority.

  • Liberal child-care plan smacks of ticking boxes as opposed to meaningful reform

    … Ottawa currently spends $23 billion on family support through the Canada Child Benefit; a further $1.4 billion through the Canada Social Transfer to provinces and territories; and $1.1 billion through the Child Care Expense Deduction. Add the $500 million a year for the child care deal and you hit $26 billion… since we’re already spending far more than at any time in Canadian history, why the need to spend even more in an area of provincial jurisdiction?

  • Ontario’s plan for ‘universal’ and ‘affordable’ day care won’t be universal and it sure isn’t affordable

    Subsidies will only be available to low- and middle-income families, and this is a good thing… Government-run day care is simply uneconomical… by increased levels of unionization among child-care workers — both those at public centres and those offering home-based day care. With Ontario’s new labour-law proposals, which would increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour and allow for easier private sector unionization, the cost increases could be even more dramatic.

  • National Child Data Strategy: Results of a Feasibility Study

    While ‘strategy’ may be too broad, key informants identified strong support for continued work on child data so long as it is clearly defined, does not duplicate existing efforts and is shaped by key players in the field. Next steps include: mapping key data initiatives, creating opportunities for conversation, creating opportunities for learning, supporting data collection, and supporting engagement and knowledge translation.

  • Childcare Expense Tax Breaks Need New Approach

    … the report proposes switching from the current tax deduction to a generous federal refundable tax credit model – along the lines of Quebec’s existing tax credit – that would considerably lower the effective price of childcare for low- to middle-income families, with the net gains from the credit slowly vanishing at higher income levels… for the federal government, which would be instituting the childcare fiscal subsidy, induced tax revenues would reduce the cost of financing the program. For provincial governments, new tax revenues generated by extra maternal work would be a windfall that could be used to fund other priorities.

  • Ontario must limit use of solitary confinement

    … while Ontario’s prison population dropped by 11 per cent over the last 10 years, the number of inmates held in segregation actually went up by 24 per cent. Disturbingly… the share of segregation cells occupied by prisoners with mental health issues increased from 32 per cent to 45 per cent between 2015 and 2016 alone… The aim should be to ensure that prisoners leave jail rehabilitated, not broken.

  • Liberals look to target child-care funding to ‘vulnerable’ families

    the Liberals want to target the promised funds to single parent households, or children with mental health issues and not only at low-income families. Mathieu Filion said the government wants to help the “most vulnerable in our society,” believing the spending could have a positive influence these children later in life.

  • The new Liberal budget will send money for ‘children’ right to the wealthy and the bureaucrats

    Currently only about 15 per cent of Canadian children 0-5 are in daycare centres. Statistics Canada reports that higher-income families are more likely to use this arrangement. Taxpayers are funding higher-income families with huge subsidies for institutional child care at the expense of lower income families — including single parents — who prioritize parental child care… To efficiently fund child care we should fund children, not spaces and their massive related system costs. We could do this by increasing the federal government’s child benefit.

  • Ontario’s child support law faces constitutional challenge

    … under the federal Divorce Act, disabled adult children are eligible for child support whether or not they are still in school. But Ontario’s Family Law Act, which covers child support for unmarried parents, makes no provision for adult disabled children. “If children of divorced parents can claim support for both education and disability beyond age 18, then children born to parents who were never married should enjoy the same rights”

  • Increase funding for a national child care program

    Experts say Ottawa is planning to spend $500 million a year for the next 10 years to build a child care network across the country. As much as that is, it’s far from the 1 per cent of GDP experts say is necessary to build a quality system… while three-quarters of mothers of young children are in the workforce, there are licensed spots available for less than a quarter of children under 5. And those that are available are incredibly expensive.