Posts Tagged ‘Indigenous’

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The pandemic worsened access to medicine for close to 1 in 5 people

Wednesday, November 16th, 2022

Percentages of people reporting not having prescription insurance to cover medication cost was higher among immigrants (29%) relative to non-immigrants (17%) and among racialized persons (29%) relative to non-racialized and non-Indigenous persons (17%)… The new findings should instill added urgency in the federal government which has promised to make progress on a national universal pharmacare program

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We know better, so why aren’t we doing better in supporting the health of children and youth in care?

Wednesday, November 16th, 2022

The complex health and social issues faced by children and youth in care call for a comprehensive cross-sector collaborative approach to health care… children and youth with child welfare involvement are at risk of bearing a heavier burden of illness than their counterparts who do not have child welfare involvement, as a result of an inequitable system of health-care provision that fails to address their unique circumstances. 

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A catalyst to mend child welfare

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2022

… youth transitioned out of Ontario’s child protection system… experience low academic achievement, unemployment or underemployment, homelessness or housing insecurity, criminal justice system involvement, early parenthood, poor health and deep loneliness… The inquest presented the opportunity to change that approach, as it focused on the flaws in the system… and suggested how they could be fixed.

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How the Indian Act’s ‘blackout period’ denied Indigenous Peoples their legal rights

Wednesday, October 12th, 2022

In 1927, the federal government introduced Section 141 into the Indian Act. It banned the solicitation or collection of funds to pursue a legal claim on behalf of an Indigenous person or group without the permission of the Department of Indian Affairs… Section 141 was introduced specifically to limit the ability of Indigenous peoples to act within the legal system… it applied to “every person” Indian and non-Indian alike.

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Alternative Federal Budget 2023: Rising to the challenge

Thursday, September 22nd, 2022

… The ongoing impact of Covid-19, inflation gnawing at stagnant paycheques, a health care system squeezed to the limit, the climate crisis, and the ongoing need to dismantle colonialism and systemic racism… The AFB  advances solutions and places the responsibility for change squarely on the federal government, working with the provinces and territories, to rise to the challenge…

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Canada’s new dental care plan will be tangible and popular: MP Don Davies

Wednesday, August 31st, 2022

While Conservative politicians like Pierre Poilievre complain about the cost of a public dental care plan, Davies notes that delivering universal health care is actually cheaper. “We have been coasting on past glories for decades,” said Davies. “Yes, we have excellent care through hospitals and physicians, but we have a two-tiered, US-style access to care for dental care, prescription drugs, eye care, auditory care, and mental health care.” 

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Indigenous people pay taxes: Demythologizing the Indian Act tax exemption

Wednesday, August 24th, 2022

… just eight per cent of Canada’s Indigenous population — who could potentially qualify for the Section 87 exemption. However, this number is likely lower because status Indians only qualify for the exemption if their income is connected to a reserve… Even though nearly all Indigenous people in Canada pay tax on their income, Canadian governments have not spent nearly as much on services for them.

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Are there ever really ‘financial reasons’ to fire faculty? Laurentian University, academic freedom, and the disciplining of the professoriate

Wednesday, April 20th, 2022

Academic Matters.ca April 2022.   By Honor Brabazon, St. Jerome’s University The 2020–21 academic year saw two incidents of Ontario professors being effectively fired: the termination of 116 of the 345 professors at Laurentian University in an unprecedented use of the Companies Creditors’ Arrangement Act (CCAA) at a public institution and the donor interference that […]

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A short history of voluntary sector–government relations in Canada (revisited)

Wednesday, April 13th, 2022

History provides an important contextual analysis for understanding current voluntary sector–government issues… This revisited historical overview will cover five dominant themes in the evolution of voluntary sector–government relations in Canada: 1) the federal state and moral charity, 2) Indigenous–settler relations, 3) a political and social reformation, 4) the rise of the welfare state, and 5) three waves, concluding with some lessons from history.

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50 years, 50 moments (part 2)

Thursday, April 7th, 2022

… we’ve compiled 50 milestones that together create a snapshot of a fast-growing sector moving into maturity, developing a clearer idea of itself and its role in Canadian society, navigating turbulent and often adversarial relationships with government, fighting for the funds and licence to fully come into its own, and able to fuel progressive shifts in spite of significant obstacles.

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Posted in Inclusion History | No Comments »


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