Posts Tagged ‘participation’

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Toronto needs to pay for the needs of a major metropolis

Sunday, February 17th, 2019

… spending is low. A few shrill voices on the right squawk on about waste at City Hall, but the facts show the city is actually spending less per resident now than it did back in 2010, when the figures are adjusted for inflation… But how does Toronto compare to other cities? One measure is the annual growth in spending over the past few years, and there it turns out Toronto ranks right near the bottom — 27th out of 29 Ontario cities listed in a Fraser Institute survey last fall.

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The Ford government needs to stop its bully tactics

Friday, February 15th, 2019

A government that has genuinely and openly consulted with affected groups, ahead of making changes, and believes its new policy can stand up to fair public scrutiny doesn’t run around demanding unknowing and unconditional support… it can be difficult for people and vulnerable groups that rely heavily on provincial policies or funding to speak out against the government of the day. But this government’s bully tactics seem to have pushed them into doing just that.

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Ontario’s looming health care reforms are being rushed through to limit public scrutiny, critics say

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019

TheStar.com Politics/Provincial Politics Feb. 11, 2019.   By ROB FERGUSON, Queen’s Park Bureau The Ford government’s looming health-care system “transformation” is being rushed through with little explanation to limit scrutiny by the public, the Ontario Health Coalition charges. Citing confidential draft legislation and other documents leaked to the New Democrats indicating elements of the plan — […]

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Student fees bankroll ‘crazy Marxist’ councils, says Premier Doug Ford

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019

Only programs that support transit, health and wellness — like athletics, walk-safe programs or counselling — and career services will be mandatory… “He seems to think his opt-out plan will help students and defund radical organizations. What he will actually defund are diversity clubs, student newspapers, (LGBT) centres, food banks, walk-home programs, Indigenous centres, and other important programming,” said Hunter.

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Experts call Ontario’s full-day kindergarten ‘visionary.’ The Ford government is eyeing changes

Sunday, February 10th, 2019

Ontario’s full-day kindergarten program is in a class by itself. With a full-time teacher and full-time early childhood educator working together, it provides a unique staffing model and two-year curriculum for the province’s 4- and 5-year-olds… a hasty change that will likely inhibit the social and economic progress being made, is irresponsible.”

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Finnish basic income trial creates happiness, but not jobs

Saturday, February 9th, 2019

In the Finnish experiment, the basic income is below what unemployment benefits pay… The basic income is tax free, but barely enough to live on for someone paying rent, so it keeps pressure on the recipients to join the work force… basic income recipients appeared less stressed, healthier and more confident in the future than a 5,000-member control group of unemployment benefits recipients… those on basic income and the unemployed people in the control group ended up working roughly the same number of days.

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Premier needs primer in the value of universal basic income to the economy

Saturday, February 9th, 2019

It might be news to the premier that most poor people in Ontario have jobs — and quite a few put in longer hours than he does. UBI is not a novel concept. Thomas More championed it in Utopia(1516). Canada saw positive outcomes from a 1970s “mincome” experiment in Manitoba, but the project was of insufficient duration to be deemed conclusive.

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How Canada’s racial data gaps can be hazardous to your health

Thursday, February 7th, 2019

Little of this potentially life-saving information is available in Canada, which leads to a dearth of knowledge about who is most at risk. From health care to education to the justice system and the work force, Canada has long been reluctant to collect or publish data based on race and ethnicity… the United Nations has repeatedly rebuked Canada for its lack of data on the ethnic composition of its population. And an increasing number of people − from academics to community organizations – are pushing to close the gap.

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Posted in Equality Policy Context | No Comments »


Full-day kindergarten keeps women in the work force. Let’s not mess with it

Thursday, February 7th, 2019

… since its full deployment, study after study has demonstrated the benefits for children and families. According to the University of Manitoba’s 2014 research, FDK “is especially beneficial for children of low socioeconomic status or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds.” For a government that purports to put Ontarians back to work to even consider changes to full-day kindergarten invites pause…

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Charting the Path to National Pharmacare in Canada

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

… a federally financed, regulated and administered pharmacare program… is constitutionally feasible because of the federal government’s current jurisdiction over drug safety, price regulation and patent protection. While it is generally assumed that federalism and provincial jurisdiction over health stand in the way of a federal government public single payer program, the provinces have supported this option in the past, with the caveat that special arrangements may have to be made for Quebec.

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Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


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