Archive for the ‘Inclusion’ Category

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Ontario Ministry of Health reverses course on guardianship requirement for disabled woman

Wednesday, September 14th, 2022

Ontario will stop requiring disabled people who are unable to manage their own finances to have a court-appointed guardian to receive home-care funding as adults. The policy change comes just weeks after the Star reported on the case of Maggie Hickey, a 19-year-old Kingston woman whose parents were told they would lose funding for Maggie’s personal support workers unless they imposed formal guardianship on their daughter.

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Supporting dementia patients and caregivers is a moral imperative

Tuesday, September 13th, 2022

On average, caregivers provided 26 care hours a week… The toll this takes on caregivers is profound… 45 per cent of caregivers exhibit symptoms of distress. And 21 per cent say they’re unable to continue their care duties due to stress.  And we have only seen the tip of the iceberg… all levels of government must help to make delaying dementia a reality.

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Rebuilding from Canada’s Senior Care Disaster

Monday, August 1st, 2022

Elder-care policy must include a focus on wellness, education, adopting healthy lifestyles, literacy with new technologies that can support health and fostering a sense of community. To achieve this, it will be necessary to… engage organizations that have the ability to impact the social determinants of health, such as not-for-profit groups, seniors’ advocacy groups, community service organizations and other human services ministries within government.

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Moving from theory to implementation on human rights and poverty

Wednesday, July 13th, 2022

When we think of “human rights,” many tend to think of large-scale, national-level issues. Cities, though, are where people experience their lives, where their ability to access their rights (or not) becomes a lived reality. Municipal governments are responsible for many of the systems that we need daily, such as zoning for housing, parks and recreation, and public health services… we have been working on articulating what the principles of a human rights approach mean in practice… so that people experience their human rights in their everyday lives

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Canadians support accepting more newcomers but we need a more equitable, rights-based approach

Monday, July 4th, 2022

To ensure a more equitable, rights-based approach, the Canadian government should draw on lessons learned from decades of refugee policy, practice and programs… Canada has a history of being a welcoming country to newcomers… Despite this, we need a more equitable, rights-based approach so we can continue to lead with the head and the heart.

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How a Massive Expansion of Public Housing Can Pay for Itself

Tuesday, May 31st, 2022

… public or non-profit housing could be built and run at break-even rents about a third lower than those of private rental housing… the provincial government could invest in creating new rental homes at a scale that would fundamentally transform our broken housing system. But there’s no reason in principle that this type of self-financed public housing couldn’t be built by any willing level of government. The federal government could certainly do it and so could large municipalities

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It’s election time and Ontario still chooses not to eliminate poverty

Tuesday, May 10th, 2022

During the campaign, Ontarians will hear a lot of about affordability, except those conversations will not focus on those who can afford the least… no matter who wins this election, people who need social assistance will find themselves in the same place they were in before the election, and the election before that. They will still be in deep, deep poverty. 

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We can’t simply build our way out of our housing crisis

Friday, April 29th, 2022

More new housing will help if it’s the kind of housing that is currently lacking, built for the people who need it most. Various studies indicate that 40 to 50 per cent of people in Canada are living paycheque-to-paycheque. That is, nearly half the population of this prosperous country are income insecure. Plans for new housing must prioritize these people.

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Housing co-ops could solve Canada’s housing affordability crisis

Wednesday, April 20th, 2022

TheConversation.com April 19, 2022.   Margaret Kohn The housing affordability crisis seems impossible to solve. Policies intended to help people priced out of the market often serve to fan the flames and increase costs. An example is tax-free down payment plans like the one just announced in the federal 2022 budget, which can drive up prices by […]

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A short history of voluntary sector–government relations in Canada (revisited)

Wednesday, April 13th, 2022

History provides an important contextual analysis for understanding current voluntary sector–government issues… This revisited historical overview will cover five dominant themes in the evolution of voluntary sector–government relations in Canada: 1) the federal state and moral charity, 2) Indigenous–settler relations, 3) a political and social reformation, 4) the rise of the welfare state, and 5) three waves, concluding with some lessons from history.

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