• Don’t ignore Steve Bannon, Trump’s political philosopher

    The moral capitalism that rebuilt the world after the Second World War has been replaced by new forms unlinked to the foundations of Judeo-Christian belief. These new forms include state capitalism, where rewards are siphoned off by a small elite. They also include a strain of brutal libertarian capitalism that treats people as mere commodities. The new right populism is a reaction to this. It is a revolt of the middle and working classes against what Bannon calls the “administrative state.”

  • How to pull voters back from the far-right brink? Look to Germany

    “We realized that people are turning toward extremist parties not because they believe their ideas, but because they feel that the government doesn’t have things under control,” Mr. Kretschmann said. “So we listened to them.”… Crime rates in his state, and across Germany, are at three-decade lows. But the Greens discovered that a lot of voters, in the wake of the 2015-16 migration crisis, were believing popular notions about immigrants and crime.

  • The health system in Canada’s North is failing — but not by accident. ‘It is designed to do what it is doing’

    During the 1920s, the government began to build segregated Indian hospitals. Many community and city hospitals refused to treat Indigenous patients or relegated them to separate wards, basements and poorly ventilated areas. Missionaries had established Indian tuberculosis sanitoriums, which were then taken over by the government and later converted to general hospitals for Indigenous people.

  • How poverty and precarious work killed a healthy Toronto man

    This man had been depending on odd jobs to meet his basic needs. His casual employers certainly didn’t offer sick days, and he simply couldn’t spare the money he’d lose by missing work to see a doctor. This man died from poverty. He died from precarious, unsafe work. He died from making just one of the many impossible choices that we saddle on people living in poverty: getting the health care that could have saved his life conflicted with a job that had so far allowed him to survive.

  • Non-profit workers offered chance to join Ontario public sector pension plan

    As many as one million Ontarians who work for registered charities and non-profit organizations will be eligible to join the provincial government pension plan under an agreement being announced Monday… Everything from non-profit arts and culture organizations, daycares, sports and recreation facilities to health and social service providers will be invited to participate. “Hardly anyone in the sector has benefits or pensions, and our research has found this has become a significant recruitment and retention issue,”

  • How Canada is recruiting more top talent than the U.S.

    … university enrollment of foreign nationals jumped 20 per cent, year over year, in 2017 helping Canada surpass its 2022 goal for foreign national enrollment… Toronto added 28,900 tech jobs last year – more than the Bay Area, Seattle, and Washington, D.C., combined.

  • Who’s playing identity politics? Everyone

    Diversity is not our strength. Unity is our strength. What makes Canada strong is our ability to unite people of diverse backgrounds with a shared set of goals and values. That is what we’re good at… there’s plenty of evidence that our highly selective immigration system – which shows no sign of changing – is quite good at identifying people who will integrate and do well. The real test of any immigration policy is: How will the kids do? And so far as I can see, most of the the kids are doing fine.

  • An Apology for Multiculturalism

    Not long ago we assumed globalization, with its intensity of interactions, would breed tolerance for others. Instead, we must fight for that ideal, even if flawed, now more than ever… We should fight for multiculturalism not because it’s easy but because it’s hard. Open societies are rare; they call to each other over the great nightmare of history, candles in windy darknesses. And yet openness to the other has always been an essential element of basic human decency.

  • We can no longer afford to whitewash our history

    The headlines about the residential schools was the catalyst that made the government admit that the history we’ve been taught has been whitewashed. All Canadian children need to know that their culture has made contributions to Canadian society… Writing workshops were scheduled this summer to update the curriculum…. But one month after the Ontario election, just before the legislature resumed, these workshops, years in the making, were suddenly cancelled.

  • Have Mayor Tory and Council Delivered on Poverty Reduction?

    In sum, thousands more residents do have access to jobs, housing, transit, child care, recreation programs and others services as a result of council decisions over the past four years. However, these modest service expansions have hardly put a dent in long waiting lists, or in Toronto’s high levels of poverty levels and inequality.