Archive for the ‘Child & Family Policy Context’ Category

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Reforming long-term care starts with Revera

Monday, October 11th, 2021

… the federal government owns 100 per cent of Revera, the second largest long-term-care and retirement home group in Canada… Revera as a for-profit chain has one of the worst records in Canada, with so far over 800 deaths in its LTC and retirement homes… The newly elected federal government should move on turning Revera over to the provinces as a not-for-profit public company in LTC… If the federal government wants to make Revera a real public not-for-profit, this is easily doable and the process could start tomorrow.

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Affordable child care will help women re-enter workforce, stimulating the economy

Monday, September 13th, 2021

By subsidizing child care to women who intend to return to work, the government provides adequate social support to those who need the help the most. Such a policy will eventually help the economy to grow naturally, and will embolden consumers’ confidence to increase spending. As women return to the workforce, their increased income yields greater spending power, boosting demand for normal goods and further stimulating the economy.

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Payments To Parents For Childcare Can Spur Supply Of New Spaces

Wednesday, September 8th, 2021

… non-subsidized spaces can be created quickly in response to an increase in demand (driven by generous childcare-related payments to parents). The Quebec experience shows that subsidized licensed care can coexist with a refundable tax credit system for non-subsidized care, and that increasing the supply of childcare can also originate from direct payments to parents.

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Canadian election 2021: Will the national child-care plan survive?

Tuesday, August 24th, 2021

In the event of a Liberal loss, a new government in Ottawa may not prioritize signing Liberal deals.  Regardless, any child-care relief will be delayed and recovery in the country’s biggest economic centres will stall. Families will watch their provincial neighbours enjoy the benefits of more affordable child care knowing they were used as political pawns. It’s a strategy with serious potential to backfire in the months and years to come as those three Conservative premiers face their own electorates. The holdouts could find themselves booted out of office.

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Liberals and NDP both have solid plans for child care. The Conservatives do not

Saturday, August 21st, 2021

O’Toole says his plan provides “flexibility” so parents can choose whatever child care they want and offers “extra support to those who need it most.” … A tax credit helps with affordability, certainly — if a family can find a child-care space in their area and if they can afford to pay the rest of the cost.  It will not help create the hundreds of thousands of new spaces that are needed across the country to expand access to everyone who wants it. It will not bring down the high costs. And it will not boost wages for child-care workers, key to attracting the workforce to expand and stabilize the system.

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Ontario should sign on to Ottawa’s $10-a-day child care plan

Thursday, August 12th, 2021

When Ford’s PC government came to power in 2018 it killed the Wynne Liberals’ plan to provide free licensed care for preschool children in Ontario. When Stephen Harper’s Conservatives came to power in 2006 they killed a national child-care program proposed by Paul Martin’s Liberal government — even though all provinces had signed on. So it’s very concerning to hear O’Toole talk about wanting to kill the Trudeau program and replace it with more “flexible” options. In other words, not an actual child-care system at all. 

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Bill 251 puts everyone in Ontario at risk of being unduly policed. This is not just a privacy and profiling issue for some — it is a human rights issue for all

Saturday, May 22nd, 2021

Bill 251 empowers police to continue their problematic legacy of conflating sex work and human trafficking… Bill 251 would insidiously enshrine a bloated law enforcement model that — true to this Ontario government — deflects attention and resources away from real, sustainable solutions that tackle poverty, precarious immigration status and lack of access to affordable housing, health and social services and labour protections.

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‘It’s time’: Local moms laud area senator’s drug-decriminalization bill

Saturday, May 1st, 2021

Former OPP commissioner leading the charge for a national strategy; ‘These are people with health issues who need treatment, not jail time’… the opioid crisis continues to devastate people and families from all walks of life. Boniface noted there were 1,517 apparent opioid toxicity deaths in Ontario in 2019… In 2019, about 75 per cent of all opioid-poisoning deaths involved fentanyl. “If that’s not enough to start a conversation, I don’t know what is”

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How the Canada Child Benefit is Performing

Friday, April 9th, 2021

The CCB had a larger effect than the enhanced UCCB, primarily because the amounts available to lower income families are greater, but both reduced poverty. Interestingly, neither had visible labour supply effects for our sample population, despite concerns that enhancing benefits would discourage work. Our work provides further evidence of the efficacy of these types of targeted cash transfers as an effective tool for redistribution and poverty reduction.

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Childcare Reform Key to Post-Covid Economic Recovery

Sunday, April 4th, 2021

Among a suite of reforms at the federal and provincial levels, the authors recommend: The existing Child Care Expense Deduction (CCED), a regressive tax deduction that reinforces patriarchal gender roles for parents, be replaced with a more generous, progressive and more frequently paid refundable tax credit… Provinces… increase childcare spaces… a single, dedicated and permanent [federal] transfer to provinces.

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