Posts Tagged ‘privatization’

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How a Massive Expansion of Public Housing Can Pay for Itself

Tuesday, May 31st, 2022

… public or non-profit housing could be built and run at break-even rents about a third lower than those of private rental housing… the provincial government could invest in creating new rental homes at a scale that would fundamentally transform our broken housing system. But there’s no reason in principle that this type of self-financed public housing couldn’t be built by any willing level of government. The federal government could certainly do it and so could large municipalities

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Ontario election gives voters the chance to choose people over profits in long-term care

Friday, May 27th, 2022

If… government replicates past decisions, more than 65,000 Ontarians a year will live in a for-profit facility — many run by corporations focused on their real estate investments — in the next decade. If we follow a different path, these subsidies could fund operators that are primarily care organizations and where real estate holdings support the care, not the other way around.

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Ontario election: 4 ways Doug Ford has changed the province’s politics

Wednesday, May 18th, 2022

The Ford government’s agenda seems driven by instinct more than ideology… fundamentally reactive, and grounded in relatively short-term perspectives… [Its] most recent legislative moves have sought to further marginalize the roles of local governments in planning matters and to eliminate public consultation requirements as red tape… The overall decision-making model… is based on access, connections and political whim… The focus… on short-term savings for consumers.

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A closer look at the federal budget’s housing plan

Friday, April 29th, 2022

To improve its approach to housing, we suggest that the federal government: 1. Reaffirm its recognition of the right to adequate housing as a fundamental human right and use this principle to guide policy-making. 2. Establish a cohesive housing policy narrative… 3. Examine demand-side solutions… 4. Consider other factors that can affect the implementation of more housing supply.

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Too many dangers in promised privatization of care economy

Tuesday, April 26th, 2022

People with complications are too costly… They’ll end up in an underfunded public not-for-profit system.  More access to care through for-profit providers does nothing to address the shortage of health care and eldercare workers and early childhood educators. Cheaper, more equitable, high-quality care that creates good jobs won’t happen by expanding for-profit care. Here are 10 advantages of investing more in public and not-for-profit care. 

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Doug Ford’s troubling push for more private health care

Thursday, March 31st, 2022

… Health Minister Christine Elliott said the Ford government was “opening up pediatric surgeries, cancer screenings, making sure that we can let independent health facilities operate private hospitals…” … For supporters of public health care, the June 2 Ontario election may be the most important in a generation.  Indeed, Ford’s drive to further privatize health care while continuing to underfund the public system and underpay health-care workers should be the top campaign issue.

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Doug Ford’s government is quietly privatizing health care

Wednesday, March 16th, 2022

Recently, Health Minister Christine Elliott announced the expansion of private hospitals in Ontario… “we can let independent health facilities operate private hospitals.”… [which] sounds a whole lot better than this: “We will award public funds to private, for-profit hospitals and clinics, knowing that these private facilities are associated with worse care, higher costs and more deaths.”

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Tuition should be free. Anything else imposes a regressive barrier to accessing higher education

Friday, March 11th, 2022

In 1990, just before Mike Harris unleashed his “common sense revolution,” roughly 20 per cent of Ontario universities’ operating income came from tuition. That figure is now more than 50 per cent, which means Ontario is well on its way to privatizing higher education… the federal government also contributes to inequitable access… An RESP is essentially a federal handout to the upper-middle classes — and the banks and markets that end up receiving those monies.

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Long banned in Ontario, private hospitals could soon reappear

Thursday, March 10th, 2022

… with the chaos created by COVID as a cover, the Ford government seems poised to allow a considerable expansion of private health care in the province… a dramatic development, allowing hospitals — the centrepieces of our health-care system — to be governed by corporate boards that prioritize profits, as in the U.S… private hospitals would undermine medicare by enabling well-to-do patients to gain faster access to treatment.

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Why Canada hasn’t been getting the new antibiotics we need to fight drug-resistant ‘superbugs’

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2022

… due to the cost of developing these drugs and their susceptibility to eventual resistance, many pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic development… newer antibiotics are used only as a last resort, reducing the volume of sales and return on investment for companies that are still willing to bear the costs of development… [and] manufacturers still producing antibiotics tend to shy away from the Canadian market due to Canada’s small population, financial barriers in our publicly funded system and burdensome regulatory processes.

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