Posts Tagged ‘poverty’

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COVID-19 could change the way we feed Canadians

Monday, July 6th, 2020

In responding to the challenges brought on by COVID-19, government, food producers, and the charities that support Canadians with food came together with unprecedented urgency ­–­ and now is not the time to lose the progress we’ve made… The most effective interventions during this crisis have been the boldest ones – the system-wide changes that strike at the heart of the problem, instead of efforts that tinker around the margins.

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Posted in Inclusion Delivery System | No Comments »


Ontario Provides Additional Funding to Support Municipalities and Urban Indigenous Community Partners

Friday, July 3rd, 2020

Municipalities and urban Indigenous community partners will be able to use this funding for long-term, innovative housing solutions resulting from the COVID-19 outbreak. They can renovate shelters or purchase new facilities that will help with physical distancing in the short term and support longer-term, more sustainable solutions to homelessness… to provide vulnerable people with food, shelter and supplies.

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Defining disability for social assistance in Ontario: Options for moving forward

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020

A stable and well-functioning social support system for people with disabilities in financial need will be crucial during and after the crisis. This report explores the role of ODSP, the risks of narrowing the definition of disability, models of disability assessment from other jurisdictions, and alternative ways that the government could reform the program… A simplified assessment system would save time and money for applicants, medical professionals, legal clinics, adjudicators, and the Social Benefits Tribunal.

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Argue against the CERB all you want — this is why you’re wrong

Thursday, June 18th, 2020

If the government’s experts are able to repair EI’s weaknesses and blend that system with pandemic income supports to nurse a full recovery, they’ll be providing a crucial backstop for the middle class for years to come. But for now, the focus on emergency help for the pandemic’s most vulnerable victims is a necessary priority.

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It’s time to expand Canadian medicare, and make it truly universal

Saturday, June 6th, 2020

Canadians have cradle-to-grave insurance for services from a doctor or hospital. But dentistry? Drugs? No. Denticare and pharmacare aren’t part of medicare… Getting to truly universal health insurance, covering all required health services, doesn’t necessarily mean doing it on medicare’s government-runs-it-all model. A number of countries with more extensive and successful health systems rely on a regulated private sector to ensure that everyone is covered.

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New report shows how Canada could fund $22,000 basic income for adults

Friday, June 5th, 2020

All options are based on BICN’s principles and goals—to reduce inequality, including inequality between women and men; prevent poverty; provide everyone with greater income security, including middle-income earners; and ensure the wealthiest individuals and corporations contribute their fair share. Each option in the report, Basic Income: Some Policy Options for Canada, meets these overall goals.

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Ontario Should Streamline Path Off Welfare With More Carrot, Less Stick

Friday, June 5th, 2020

The report recommends: Reducing the cost of working through less punitive benefit claw-back rates; and higher exemptions for earned employment income while on the program… Ensuring appropriate work requirements and support… Placing supplemental benefits outside social assistance… Shifting the focus in disability support programs from the inability to work to the ability to work.

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Why do provinces often confiscate federal benefits from people who clearly need them?

Saturday, May 23rd, 2020

Taken together, as many as 52,000 people on social assistance receive federal and provincial benefits that are subject to complete clawbacks… Those clawbacks poured about $34 million into provincial coffers in April… Ontario isn’t ready to give any of that money back to people such as Demerse by treating EI the same as CERB during the pandemic… it may be time to consider uploading social assistance to the federal level and leave provinces to continue offering supports such as employment training, prescription drugs, dental and vision care for low-income residents

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Social Assistance Summaries: New numbers from across Canada

Friday, May 22nd, 2020

Social Assistance Summaries is an annual publication that reports on the number of people receiving social assistance (welfare payments) in each province and territory, and how those numbers have changed over time. It draws on data provided by provincial and territorial governments. The report also briefly describes social assistance programs in each province and territory.

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The CERB is nothing like a basic income, but it might be the platform we use to build one

Friday, May 22nd, 2020

the possibility that today’s pandemic-induced mass unemployment may continue for longer than anticipated makes reform of income support both more likely and more urgent. And the general idea of a basic income – a single, unconditional transfer, without the intrusive and bewildering eligibility requirements that demean its recipients and leave many others without – remains as valid as ever… The CERB, for all its limitations, has created the precedent for a federal benefit of this kind. Maybe there’s an opening here, after all.

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