Posts Tagged ‘disabilities’

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Canadians with disabilities fell through the cracks in the pandemic response. Here’s what needs to change as Omicron surges

Tuesday, January 11th, 2022

… living with a disability is one minority group that anyone can join.  Disability Without Poverty is led by people with disabilities and came about around the end of 2020 in response to gaps in how the government served their communities during the pandemic and to push for a national disability benefit, which has been slowly moving through Parliament and would provide support besides existing provincial programs. 

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What COVID-19 has taught us about caring for our elders

Wednesday, January 5th, 2022

A recent survey by the National Institute on Aging found that almost 100 per cent of Canadians aged 65 and older planned to live in their own home for as long as possible. Yet Canada spends 87 per cent of long-term care dollars on institutionalizing people in nursing homes rather than at-home assistance.

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Canada Underinvests In Community Care

Friday, December 17th, 2021

Canada’s per capita spending on homecare and other outpatient and day program services falls below the international average. In general, countries that direct higher proportions of health spending to seniors care than Canada also spend more per capita on home care, outpatient care and day programs for seniors.

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Welfare in Canada, 2020

Sunday, December 12th, 2021

For each province and territory, this report provides data and analysis on the total welfare income that households receiving social assistance would have qualified for in 2020, including COVID-19 pandemic-related supports… The reports look at four different household types for each province and territory.

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CERB helped Canadians during COVID-19 — but not the most vulnerable

Friday, December 10th, 2021

CERB is an example of a liberal welfare policy that distinguishes between the deserving and undeserving. Benefits were limited to $2,000 per month and taxable. Benefits were only available to people who earned a minimum of $5,000 in the previous year and whose work was directly affected by COVID-19… Like many limited means-tested programs that emphasize work above all else, CERB left out the most vulnerable in our society.

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Canadians want home care, not long-term care facilities, after COVID-19

Monday, November 15th, 2021

… home care is expensive, even when governmental subsidies exist — it has a much heftier price tag than public nursing home care. And for those who don’t have family members who can provide informal care, public long-term care homes are often their only choice… Governments must make home care a viable option for their aging citizens by making it more affordable via a variety of means, including subsidies and tax exemptions.

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The cost of living is rising. So why aren’t social-assistance rates?

Tuesday, November 2nd, 2021

Year-over-year, Canada’s Consumer Price Index, a measure of inflation, rose 4.4 per cent — the highest rate since 2003 — in September… Shelter is up 4.8 per cent, and food is up 3.9 per cent. But ODSP benefits haven’t increased since the Doug Ford government halved a planned 3 per cent bump three years ago, saying the previous government had committed to spending money the province didn’t have… ODSP payments now are worth less than they were 17 years ago.

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Reforming long-term care starts with Revera

Monday, October 11th, 2021

… the federal government owns 100 per cent of Revera, the second largest long-term-care and retirement home group in Canada… Revera as a for-profit chain has one of the worst records in Canada, with so far over 800 deaths in its LTC and retirement homes… The newly elected federal government should move on turning Revera over to the provinces as a not-for-profit public company in LTC… If the federal government wants to make Revera a real public not-for-profit, this is easily doable and the process could start tomorrow.

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How a national disability benefit would improve my life — and the lives of so many others

Saturday, October 9th, 2021

I’m one of more than six million Canadians with a disability. More than 40 per cent of people who live below the poverty line in Canada have a disability…  Poverty makes my life challenging. COVID-19 made it worse. A national disability benefit would improve my life in many ways. A national disability benefit would help people like me improve our living conditions and be less isolated. It would have a positive impact on our health and wellness. It would raise us out of poverty and allow us to live with dignity. 

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Mental health must be part of curriculum as students cope with COVID-19, say experts

Saturday, August 21st, 2021

Mental health literacy must be at the top of the agenda as students return to school, say experts, calling for emotional skills to be taught as a core part of curricula… Emerging research suggests rates of anxiety and depression among Canadian youth climbed during the pandemic, prompting some advocates to warn of a mounting mental health crisis… mental health literacy is inconsistent across the country, and programs that are didactic or siloed off from normal coursework can do more harm than good. The Mental Health Literacy Project is striving to fill in these gaps with an evidence-backed curriculum

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