Posts Tagged ‘disabilities’

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Provincial cuts leave adults with disabilities ‘hanging on a ledge’

Saturday, January 19th, 2019

Parents unable to manage or co-ordinate their adult son or daughter’s daily life believe the only options are day programs, which cost as much as $35,000 a year, or residential care, that typically runs at $140,000 annually, McGill says. Independent facilitators, however, work with individuals to discover their dreams, interests and goals and connect them with much less costly community resources.

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You can’t say inclusive education doesn’t work. We haven’t even begun to try

Friday, January 11th, 2019

Education is not a privilege. It is a human right. That means no child has more of a right to walk into a classroom than any other child. We all know that is not how the system currently works. Our education model was created to support “typically developing” children. When segregated classrooms were abolished, we invited children with disabilities and children who were neurodiverse into a space that was essentially designed to guarantee their failure.

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As parents of complex special-needs kids, we know inclusive education doesn’t work

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

… inclusion – a system which seeks to include special-needs students in regular classrooms – does not work for complex special-needs students (those, for example, with low functioning autism, Down syndrome, a physical disability and/or who are medically fragile.) However, it can work for mid and moderate special-needs students. (Those with dyslexia for example, or high-functioning Down syndrome or autism.)… The truth is that both camps have their place in education.

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Advocates for students with disabilities call on Ontario to stop school exclusions

Monday, January 7th, 2019

Autism advocates in Ontario are calling on the province to remove a principal’s power to exclude students from school for an indefinite period, saying it is being misused as a disciplinary measure that disproportionately targets children with special needs… families with children who have intellectual and developmental disabilities are increasingly being asked to pick up kids early, start the school day later or simply keep them home for days.

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Educating Grayson: Are inclusive classrooms failing students?

Saturday, January 5th, 2019

Paul Bennett, an education consultant based in Halifax, says a movement to make the classroom the be-all and end-all of inclusion is shortsighted. “The system is not built to accommodate the range of diversity we now have in our school system,” he says. In the case of children… who have the most complex and acute needs, Mr. Bennett says the public education system should provide one-on-one intensive supports and only provide alternative school settings if integration doesn’t work.

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WSIB staffers decry chaos caused by ‘broken’ system that’s putting injured workers at risk

Monday, December 10th, 2018

Chronic understaffing, long wait times and chaotic case management at Ontario’s workers compensation board are putting vulnerable accident victims at risk, compromising the integrity of the provincial compensation system, and jeopardizing financial accountability, according to the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board’s own employees.

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Advocates urge Senate to improve national accessibility law

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

Currently, the legislation sets no timetable for Ottawa to meet its goal of a “barrier-free” Canada and nothing in the legislation compels the government to act… Federally regulated entities are required to develop accessibility plans, but the law does not require those plans to be good or even implemented… And the law wrongly splinters the power to make and enforce accessibility standards across numerous federal agencies, [which] will make it less effective and more confusing, complicated and costly.

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Making sense of Ontario’s social assistance reforms

Sunday, December 2nd, 2018

Under 2018 budget measures, since scrapped by the Ford government, those on OW would have been able to work themselves well out of poverty before losing their benefits. But under the changes, a person on OW will still be almost $6,000 below the poverty line when their earnings make them ineligible for welfare… Currently, a single person on ODSP can work himself out of poverty while still receiving social assistance, but under the changes would be almost $4,000 short when becoming ineligible.

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Welfare in Canada 2017

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

The Welfare in Canada reports look at the total incomes available to those relying on social assistance (often called “welfare”), taking into account tax credits and other benefits along with social assistance itself. The reports look at four different household types for each province and territory. The reports are a continuation of the Welfare Incomes series originally published by the National Council of Welfare

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Ontario’s social assistance reforms hint at direction, offer few specifics, and have problematic implications

Thursday, November 29th, 2018

What was entirely missing from the government’s announcement was any rationale for this change in incentive structure. We’re left to wonder whether there is any good reason to change the pattern of incentives so those working fewer hours are better off, but those working more hours are worse off… Only the tiniest fraction of ODSP recipients could possibly ever work under the proposed new definition, so the higher exemption levels will likely apply to almost no one.

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