Posts Tagged ‘featured’

« Older Entries |

Why not let the women and children in the Tijuana camp resettle in Canada?

Wednesday, December 12th, 2018

Canada has set out that the treatment of women and girls is a priority of our international policy. One of the key findings of the World Refugee Council Report to be released in the new year is the extent of discrimination against women in refugee situations. Here is a clear opportunity to act against such bias… Canadian leadership in meeting this tragedy on our doorstep would be a welcome, tangible demonstration of how the compacts can be a springboard for direct action and lead to improved collaboration on migration and refugees issues.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Inclusion Debates | No Comments »


Ontario government loosens child-care rules, raising safety concerns

Friday, December 7th, 2018

The government is easing daycare age ratios for the province’s youngest children — loosening restrictions that were introduced five years ago after a number of baby deaths… Under the Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act, the province plans to allow a home child-care operator to supervise three children under age 2 — up from the current two. It also will allow two providers to look after six infants or toddlers at a time, up from the current maximum of four, with the rules applying to both licensed and unlicensed caregivers.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


Not all Ontarians are being asked to sacrifice

Friday, December 7th, 2018

So far I have not seen business sacrifice. I have seen them given tax breaks, offered less red tape, offered payment not to pollute, and given lucrative opportunities to sell cannabis — and I expect private companies will be given more access to health care. In the fall economic statement the most vulnerable have been asked to sacrifice.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Equality Debates | No Comments »


Making sense of Ontario’s social assistance reforms

Sunday, December 2nd, 2018

Under 2018 budget measures, since scrapped by the Ford government, those on OW would have been able to work themselves well out of poverty before losing their benefits. But under the changes, a person on OW will still be almost $6,000 below the poverty line when their earnings make them ineligible for welfare… Currently, a single person on ODSP can work himself out of poverty while still receiving social assistance, but under the changes would be almost $4,000 short when becoming ineligible.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


PC bait and switch on climate change punishes Ontario taxpayers to pay off polluters

Sunday, December 2nd, 2018

Rather than imposing a price on carbon pollution as a cost of doing business, the Tories are shifting the burden to taxpayers by making them subsidize big business. Instead of polluters paying up, polluters are being paid off with $400 million in corporate carbon welfare that comes at taxpayers’ expense. Turns out that the premier’s famous “axe the tax” slogan served to disguise a bait-and-switch ploy that lets big business escape unscathed — taking the hatchet to taxpayer’s pocketbooks while slashing environmental protection.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Policy Context | No Comments »


Ottawa promises Indigenous child welfare changes to end ‘humanitarian crisis’

Saturday, December 1st, 2018

… the coming legislation is intended to reform federally-delivered services so that children aren’t taken from Indigenous families into private foster care solely on the basis of economic poverty or health issues that go untreated. It will also ensure Indigenous groups have the right to determine their own laws, policies and practices for child and family services… the new child welfare bill is another part of the effort to scrap the 19th-century Indian Act and reconstitute the federal government’s relationship with First Nations, Inuit and Métis to recognize the Indigenous right to self-determination.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Equality Policy Context | No Comments »


Ottawa just quietly launched a new kind of capitalism

Wednesday, November 28th, 2018

Buried deep in his speech, Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced the Social Finance Fund, a $755-million investment to kickstart Canada’s social-finance market… Social finance fills the wide-open space between business and philanthropy. It challenges the notion that financial profit and social purpose are mutually exclusive by creating new business models and investment vehicles that aim to create a measurable social or environmental benefit while also making a financial return.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Debates | No Comments »


How Non-Profit Housing Developers Could Ease Toronto’s Affordability Crisis

Monday, November 26th, 2018

… investing in permanent housing solutions, like those provided by non-profit developers, would produce long-term savings. “If something financially makes sense, which is to invest in housing for homeless populations, why wouldn’t you do it? The only answer to that is ideology,” Adams says. “And it’s this belief that ideology, the private sector, the for-profit sector… is going to be a partner in the solution,” says Adams. “We have been beating that drum for 20 years now. Guess what, it didn’t work.”

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Delivery System | No Comments »


We deserve tax fairness from the Canadian Revenue Agency

Saturday, November 24th, 2018

Tax evasion is not a victimless crime. Indeed, the Conference Board of Canada estimated last year that the federal government is missing out on $16 billion a year of uncollected taxes — and possibly as much as $47.8 billion. Ideally, everyone should want to pay their fair share of the taxes that provide the services and programs that make Canada a great place to live. But when they don’t, Canadians should be able to feel confident that the revenue agency will try to run everyone to ground fairly and equally.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Equality Policy Context | No Comments »


The lessons of Harry Leslie Smith: The fight never ends

Saturday, November 24th, 2018

Harry lays out in pungent and unsparing detail what exactly it was like to be poor and hopeless when those things were considered ineradicable conditions or moral faults, not social failures that could be improved… he’s in a province, Ontario, that has just frozen the minimum wage and is skewering workers’ rights… Many people have heard Harry’s message. Acting on it, and honouring those memories – that’s something else.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security History | No Comments »


« Older Entries |