Archive for the ‘Governance Debates’ Category

« Older Entries |

Doug Ford has bungled affordable housing and now Ottawa is rubbing his nose in it

Tuesday, May 14th, 2024

The federal government now says it will send funding directly to municipalities, cutting Ontario out of the equation entirely… Why can the two levels of government come together to build subsidized factories, but not subsidized housing? … Ultimately, the friction over funding may have less to do with personalities than priorities. In Ford’s Ontario, unaffordable factories count for more than affordable housing.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Trudeau would be wise to raise the GST to 7 per cent instead of reforming the capital gains tax

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2024

… the GST has underwritten Canada’s social safety net for more than 30 years. In 2006… the GST accounted for 30.6 per cent of all federal tax revenue… Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and finance minister Chrystia Freeland have sought refuge in progressive populism with their plan to expand the capital gains tax. But the sustainable policy choice would be to put those two points back on the GST.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Democracy Is Under Siege Globally. Canada Is Being Tested

Monday, April 8th, 2024

Finkelstein preached that you didn’t need a vision to win in politics, just good polling that revealed what people were against. Once that was established, the goal became tying the unpopular thing — immigration, carbon tax, inflation — to a flesh and blood political “enemy.” … The idea was to avoid talking about your own positions and policies, the better to demonize your opponent. The objective was not to sell yourself but rather to destroy your opponent…  repeating simplistic slogans… “Axe the tax.” “Not worth the price.” “Everything is broken.” 

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


With its 2024 budget, the Ford government is asking you to trust it. You shouldn’t

Thursday, March 28th, 2024

… it’s one thing to announce billions in new health-care spending… It’s another to admit that 1.3 per cent growth is below inflation and nowhere near enough to sustain public health care in the province, let alone sufficiently expand it. It’s another still to admit that all this program spending amounts, on balance, to real-dollar cuts… The government is going all-in on highways and roads — with a few nods to the poor suckers stuck taking inadequate, crumbling public transportation. 

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Ford government’s budget shortfall soars to $9.8 billion as tax revenues plunge

Wednesday, March 27th, 2024

“… We are going to follow through on a plan that is working — knowing that the higher deficits, compared to what we projected last year, will be time-limited while the return on investment will be felt for decades.” … settlements with public servants after the government’s Bill 124 wage-cap legislation was found to be unconstitutional have added billions in additional costs to the treasury. Under Ford, the provincial debt has soared by $116 billion to $462.9 billion, the largest debt of any subnational jurisdiction in the world.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Is starving Ontario’s hospitals and schools really something to brag about?

Tuesday, March 26th, 2024

In the last five years, the Ministry of Finance has brought in close to 30 measures to reduce its own revenues. All told, those changes drained no less than $7.7 billion from the provincial treasury in 2023-24… The overarching goal is not to use public dollars efficiently, it’s to drive economic activity into the private sector so investors can turn a profit. This is why the current Ontario government has no qualms about privatizing surgeries and diagnostic procedures — even though private procedures can cost more than double what they cost in a public hospital.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


So, what expenditures should Canada cut to meet its NATO obligations?

Thursday, March 21st, 2024

About a quarter of all spending is transferred directly to Canadians, either through elderly benefits (Old Age Security and Guaranteed Income Supplement), Employment Insurance benefits and the Canada Child Benefit… Another 20 per cent of Ottawa’s spending is transferred directly to the provincial governments… Equalization payments account for about $24-billion… Interest payments on the debt account for another $47-billion… while Ottawa’s total spending is $500-billion, only $96-billion in operating spending is discretionary

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Canadians could have a balanced budget and better tax system: C.D. Howe Institute Shadow Budget

Tuesday, February 27th, 2024

Beyond reducing the debt burden to a level that is prudent and more fair to younger Canadians, the authors advocate tax changes to reward work and investment… The Shadow Budget proposes restoring the GST to 7 percent over time, lowering the rate for the middle personal income tax bracket to 15 percent in 2027, and lowering the general corporate income tax rate by one percentage point in 2025 and another in 2026.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


The crisis hitting small-town Ontario

Saturday, February 24th, 2024

Communities across the province are grappling with overdoses and appealing for more resources to deal with the crisis… According to the Ontario Drug Policy Research Network, the opioid death rate is three times higher in northern than southern Ontario… While we often hear complaints about the lack of sufficient treatment and harm reduction facilities in large cities like Toronto, smaller communities are lucky if they have any at all.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Surrendering to the provinces doesn’t bring peace to the federation. It only emboldens them

Wednesday, January 10th, 2024

The thesis… that peace with the provinces is the highest aim of federal policy, and that the way to achieve it is to give them everything they want – or at least to never give them any offence – is a recipe for national paralysis. There are issues on which federal leadership is essential… how we got here [is] not because the federal government has been too hard on the provinces, but because it has been altogether too indulgent of them.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


« Older Entries |