Archive for the ‘Child & Family’ Category

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Canadians want home care, not long-term care facilities, after COVID-19

Monday, November 15th, 2021

… home care is expensive, even when governmental subsidies exist — it has a much heftier price tag than public nursing home care. And for those who don’t have family members who can provide informal care, public long-term care homes are often their only choice… Governments must make home care a viable option for their aging citizens by making it more affordable via a variety of means, including subsidies and tax exemptions.

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The Care Economy Data Room: Eldercare

Friday, November 12th, 2021

Canada spends roughly 1.2% of GDP on eldercare. The OECD average is 1.7% of GDP… Nine out of ten older Canadians live at home. While care needs increase with age, even among those aged 85 and older, only 32 per cent live in residential care… There are currently 38,500 people in Ontario on waiting lists for long term care, with waits as long as 5 years… 3 million Canadians rely on unpaid, informal care – 39% rely exclusively on informal care – most of which is provided by women.

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The Care Economy Data Room: Early Learning & Childcare

Saturday, November 6th, 2021

… facts that will shape the future of early learning and childcare… Canada was dead last among 14 peer nations’ public spending on early learning and childcare in 2006, at 0.25% of GDP… Half the workers in the sector were paid less than $19.20 per hour.

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Home child care should be affordable, high-quality — and licensed

Monday, October 18th, 2021

… we propose a system under which every home child-care provider serving more than one unrelated child has to be individually licensed. A provincewide coalition of independent home child-care providers argued precisely for this path of individual licensing when Ontario modernized the legislation governing child care in 2014. In addition to oversight of every home child-care provider, our model involves substantial support for quality improvements for all home child care.

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Reforming long-term care starts with Revera

Monday, October 11th, 2021

… the federal government owns 100 per cent of Revera, the second largest long-term-care and retirement home group in Canada… Revera as a for-profit chain has one of the worst records in Canada, with so far over 800 deaths in its LTC and retirement homes… The newly elected federal government should move on turning Revera over to the provinces as a not-for-profit public company in LTC… If the federal government wants to make Revera a real public not-for-profit, this is easily doable and the process could start tomorrow.

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‘Don’t mess with moms. Get it done’: 50 prominent Canadian women urge party leaders to prioritize child care

Wednesday, September 15th, 2021

… investing in early childhood education shows that serious investment in high-quality child care will boost economic growth while reducing poverty and drastically improving education levels among young kids. The signatories of the letter say affordability is key… A report from the CCPA recently found that a Toronto family paying full fees for a child in licensed daycare could save $10,000 more per year under the Liberal child-care plan than with the Conservatives’ tax credit… We’re waiting to see how these parties will act in office…

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Affordable child care will help women re-enter workforce, stimulating the economy

Monday, September 13th, 2021

By subsidizing child care to women who intend to return to work, the government provides adequate social support to those who need the help the most. Such a policy will eventually help the economy to grow naturally, and will embolden consumers’ confidence to increase spending. As women return to the workforce, their increased income yields greater spending power, boosting demand for normal goods and further stimulating the economy.

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Payments To Parents For Childcare Can Spur Supply Of New Spaces

Wednesday, September 8th, 2021

… non-subsidized spaces can be created quickly in response to an increase in demand (driven by generous childcare-related payments to parents). The Quebec experience shows that subsidized licensed care can coexist with a refundable tax credit system for non-subsidized care, and that increasing the supply of childcare can also originate from direct payments to parents.

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Canadian election 2021: Will the national child-care plan survive?

Tuesday, August 24th, 2021

In the event of a Liberal loss, a new government in Ottawa may not prioritize signing Liberal deals.  Regardless, any child-care relief will be delayed and recovery in the country’s biggest economic centres will stall. Families will watch their provincial neighbours enjoy the benefits of more affordable child care knowing they were used as political pawns. It’s a strategy with serious potential to backfire in the months and years to come as those three Conservative premiers face their own electorates. The holdouts could find themselves booted out of office.

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Liberals and NDP both have solid plans for child care. The Conservatives do not

Saturday, August 21st, 2021

O’Toole says his plan provides “flexibility” so parents can choose whatever child care they want and offers “extra support to those who need it most.” … A tax credit helps with affordability, certainly — if a family can find a child-care space in their area and if they can afford to pay the rest of the cost.  It will not help create the hundreds of thousands of new spaces that are needed across the country to expand access to everyone who wants it. It will not bring down the high costs. And it will not boost wages for child-care workers, key to attracting the workforce to expand and stabilize the system.

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