Posts Tagged ‘child care’

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How many Torontonians does it take to open a daycare?

Thursday, December 13th, 2018

The most precious quailed at the thought of hearing children at play. “The idea of tolerating (it) is frankly ludicrous, and completely incongruent with this, or any other, residential corner in this city,” one couple wrote to the city. More reasonable folks claim daycare in Cabbagetown is a fine idea, just “not on this particular street,” because it is “too narrow,” with “too many cars on it.” That describes all streets in Cabbagetown, though.

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Ontario government loosens child-care rules, raising safety concerns

Friday, December 7th, 2018

The government is easing daycare age ratios for the province’s youngest children — loosening restrictions that were introduced five years ago after a number of baby deaths… Under the Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act, the province plans to allow a home child-care operator to supervise three children under age 2 — up from the current two. It also will allow two providers to look after six infants or toddlers at a time, up from the current maximum of four, with the rules applying to both licensed and unlicensed caregivers.

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Ottawa promises Indigenous child welfare changes to end ‘humanitarian crisis’

Saturday, December 1st, 2018

… the coming legislation is intended to reform federally-delivered services so that children aren’t taken from Indigenous families into private foster care solely on the basis of economic poverty or health issues that go untreated. It will also ensure Indigenous groups have the right to determine their own laws, policies and practices for child and family services… the new child welfare bill is another part of the effort to scrap the 19th-century Indian Act and reconstitute the federal government’s relationship with First Nations, Inuit and Métis to recognize the Indigenous right to self-determination.

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Child care called key to ending child poverty

Tuesday, November 20th, 2018

In Ontario, 545,000 children — or 19.5 per cent — are living in poverty… poverty among First Nations children in Canada is a staggering 40 per cent, while those in visible minority families experience poverty rates of 25.5 per cent… the coalition is calling on Ottawa to invest $6 billion in the 2019 budget and commit to cutting poverty by 50 per cent in five years instead of waiting until 2030, as set out in proposed poverty-reduction legislation introduced earlier this month.

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PCs take Ontario back to bad old days of political fundraising

Tuesday, November 20th, 2018

… buried within the… Restoring Trust, Transparency and Accountability Act… are a set of changes that would at the least loosen, and potentially eviscerate, the province’s new campaign finance regime… What urgent public imperative requires that corporations and unions be allowed to donate to political parties — and not openly but surreptitiously?… there’s no reason parties need to spend anything like as much as they do, and lots of reasons to prefer they should spend less…

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Unpaid caregivers do a lot of heavy lifting – and they deserve more support

Tuesday, November 20th, 2018

Stats Can also reports that 8.1 million Canadians are providing some level of care to a loved one, suggesting that the majority of care, especially of seniors, is being done on an informal basis… A large number of caregivers, 44 per cent, said their loved ones have “aging issues” that require help, but a significant number, 17 per cent, care for someone with dementia, and as many care for someone with a significant physical disability… if caregivers were paid the equivalent of Ontario’s minimum wage ($14 an hour), their economic contributions would range from $26-billion to $72-billion a year.

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Child advocate is a cruel target for Tory cuts

Monday, November 19th, 2018

… t an advocate isn’t the same thing as an ombudsman. “It outrages me that we’ve removed somebody who (people) can call who will stand beside them,” says Elman — “not an ombudsman, who’s going to look at both sides and decide whether the policy was adhered to properly, but somebody is going to stand beside that parent and be with them, or beside that child in the group home and say, ‘We’ve got you.’”

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B.C. advances on child care while Ontario takes a step back

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

In 2016 the Ontario government began its plan to help create 100,000 new child care spaces. Then in early 2018… there was finally movement on making these spaces more affordable for Ontario families — who current pay the country’s highest child care fees… But oh, the difference an election makes… the prevailing Ford PCs have promised only a small tax credit that will do almost nothing to alleviate the financial pressure faced by families…

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Axing Ontario’s child advocate puts our most vulnerable kids at even greater risk

Saturday, November 17th, 2018

Ontario had the first child advocacy office in Canada, created in 1978, the International Year of the Child. It received its first legislated mandate in 1984… The child advocate now has powers of investigation… [with] an impressive advocacy office, trusted by children and youth and the people working in the sector. Now this government wants to tear it down, buried in a budget bill.

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Why Canada needs a ‘Children’s Charter’

Friday, September 21st, 2018

… infant mortality rates are approximately five times higher in Nunavut than they are in British Columbia. Childhood poverty rates are 50 per cent higher in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick than they are in Alberta. As health, education and social programs generally fall under provincial jurisdiction, without federal standards geographic disparities are likely to persist. Children First Canada has called for the implementation of a Canadian Children’s Charter. It has also called for the establishment of an independent national commission for children and youth to advocate for children’s rights within the federal government.

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