Posts Tagged ‘child care’

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Some key details in the “confidence and supply” deal between the Liberals, NDP

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2022

The NDP will not move a vote of non-confidence, nor vote for a non-confidence motion during the term of the arrangement; Parties agree on the importance of parliamentary scrutiny and the work done by MPs at committees; Meetings of party leaders at least once per quarter, as well as regular meetings of House leaders and whips… to identify priority bills to expedite through the House of Commons… Parties agree to prioritize [the following]…

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With deadline looming, why hasn’t Ontario signed a child-care deal yet?

Monday, March 7th, 2022

Morna Ballantyne, executive director of Child Care Now, said Ontario’s funding of full-day junior kindergarten is irrelevant. “The idea is to use this federal money to build on what already exists,” she said. “If Ontario wants to argue that the federal government should pay a share of public education, then they should make that proposal.”… Parliamentary Budget Officer Yves Giroux said the $27.2 billion the Liberals have budgeted for the Canada-wide program would not be enough to meet expected demand.

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No good reason for Ontario to delay signing child-care agreement

Friday, February 11th, 2022

… a small minority is trying to weaken the pan-Canadian policy. They are trying to undermine the national approach, for reasons that include skepticism, financial self-interest and old-fashioned nostalgia for the 1950s family… There is no reason to cave to those who seek to weaken child-care policy. For more than 838,000 children five and under years – and for everyone who relies on someone who relies on child care – a solid Ontario child-care agreement can’t come soon enough.

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Could a $10-a-day deal hurt Ontario’s thousands of child-care businesses?

Wednesday, February 9th, 2022

… nobody is worse off, and more are better off. The new federal funding expands and improves the quality of care, helping licensed businesses stay afloat and focus on the business of care. It creates more better-paid job opportunities… And it reduces uncertainty for parents and providers in tandem, instead of waiting for markets to deliver what they haven’t — quality care where and when it is needed. 

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Doug Ford is the only premier who has yet to sign Ottawa’s $10-a-day child-care deal. He’s right to push back

Wednesday, January 26th, 2022

Ontario wants the feds to either give it more money, or acknowledge the care it already provides in full-day kindergarten, which costs the province $3.6 billion annually… It makes no sense that Ontario’s success in providing early learning and child care to the vast majority of four-year-olds through full-day kindergarten isn’t included, because excluding it makes meeting federal access targets unachievable. 

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After decades of delay, national child-care plan proves an ambitious social agenda is possible

Thursday, January 13th, 2022

… now that it’s clear a national child-care system is politically viable, it will be up to the Trudeau government to ensure that the one it’s started to build is strong — and public. The success of Scandinavian-style child care stems from the fact that it is a truly public system — like our school system — with no place for private profit-making, which leads to cutting corners on staff and resources.

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Canadians with disabilities fell through the cracks in the pandemic response. Here’s what needs to change as Omicron surges

Tuesday, January 11th, 2022

… living with a disability is one minority group that anyone can join.  Disability Without Poverty is led by people with disabilities and came about around the end of 2020 in response to gaps in how the government served their communities during the pandemic and to push for a national disability benefit, which has been slowly moving through Parliament and would provide support besides existing provincial programs. 

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… here’s what you need to know about the $40B child welfare agreements

Thursday, January 6th, 2022

After the graves of children who died in Indian Residential Schools were found, countless Canadians stood in solidarity with Indigenous communities and demanded the government not repeat mistakes of the past…  public support will be needed more than ever to ensure that the spirit of the agreement is respected and translated into meaningful change for First Nations children.

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Ottawa releases early details of landmark $40B First Nations child welfare agreement

Wednesday, January 5th, 2022

The non-binding agreement sets aside $20 billion for compensation and $20 billion for long-term reform of the on-reserve child welfare system…  The parties have until March 31 to finalize the agreement… The $20 billion dedicated to long-term reform of the child welfare system will be distributed over a period of five years… “Today is about a plan for the future, with First Nations defining and determining a path forward grounded in our rights and the common goal to have our children succeed,”

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Is there a made-in-Canada solution to high inflation?

Saturday, January 1st, 2022

Inflation and the pandemic have a lot in common: both attack household incomes, both hit low-income households hardest, and both demand government action to support incomes. Social assistance rates must rise, as they should have years ago. Minimum wages must rise. Federal transfers to low-income Canadians should increase. Painful 20th century policy prescriptions to cut inflation by squeezing the life out of the economy, through increasing interest rates and reducing government supports, are no answer to our 21st century problems. They will only make our problems worse.

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