Archive for the ‘Social Security’ Category

« Older Entries |

Five good ideas for income supports in a post-CERB Canada

Friday, July 31st, 2020

… the notion that you can only have… a strong income support system or a thriving economy… is a false dichotomy, and our post-pandemic recovery requires us to move past this narrative… we need to fundamentally ensure that people with lived and living experience of poverty and income insecurity are at the centre of policy-making… Failing to put human rights at the centre of our efforts would be an abdication of our collective responsibility.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Policy Context, Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


Ontario Should Streamline Path Off Welfare With More Carrot, Less Stick

Thursday, July 30th, 2020

… the province of Ontario has the worst dependency rate on social assistance programs in Canada… Ontario Works (OW) and the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP) – have been characterized by high costs and poor recipient outcomes. With about one million Ontarians receiving social assistance benefits… the average dependency duration on OW has substantially increased from 19 months in 2009 to 35 months in 2018.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


Lasting programs needed to cure our social wounds

Thursday, July 9th, 2020

COVID-19 is laying bare the consequences of four decades of neoliberal social policy choices… The poverty, homelessness and precarious work we tolerate and try to bury under inadequate social supports. The entrenched historical structural inequities like racism and sexism we sweep under the carpet but are the driving determinants of who is most negatively impacted by COVID-19 and most other illnesses.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context, Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


Now is the time to bring a basic income program to Canada, says B.C. senator. But the pilot project could cost $100 billion

Thursday, July 9th, 2020

Woo’s proposal would put the basic income project in place for six months from October of this year until March 2021. A basic income could replace income support programs like welfare with money everyone would receive, but the support would gradually be reduced as a person’s income rose. Woo said the COVID-19 pandemic is the ideal time to do a broad test of the idea.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Defining disability for social assistance in Ontario: Options for moving forward

Tuesday, June 30th, 2020

A stable and well-functioning social support system for people with disabilities in financial need will be crucial during and after the crisis. This report explores the role of ODSP, the risks of narrowing the definition of disability, models of disability assessment from other jurisdictions, and alternative ways that the government could reform the program… A simplified assessment system would save time and money for applicants, medical professionals, legal clinics, adjudicators, and the Social Benefits Tribunal.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


New report shows why a basic income makes sense during COVID-19 recovery

Monday, June 29th, 2020

… Canada should adapt a progressive version of basic income, similar to how the country’s Old Age Security and child benefit programs are calculated. Essentially, your basic income cheque increases and decreases depending on how much other income you make… the country can pay for basic income — either through existing tax programs, or with a new wealth tax, or by increasing sales tax slightly… “It gives people both the security and the flexibility to manoeuvre through transitions”

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Why the CERB had to be extended – and why it has to be fixed

Wednesday, June 17th, 2020

… incentives matter. If someone can receive as much money for working as not working, that’s an incentive to not work. The CERB payment is $500 a week; assuming a 35-hour week, that’s more than the minimum wage in eight provinces… If someone declines work under those conditions, it isn’t because they’re lazy or irresponsible. It just shows that they’ve got a grasp on their own financial arithmetic.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


New report shows how Canada could fund $22,000 basic income for adults

Friday, June 5th, 2020

All options are based on BICN’s principles and goals—to reduce inequality, including inequality between women and men; prevent poverty; provide everyone with greater income security, including middle-income earners; and ensure the wealthiest individuals and corporations contribute their fair share. Each option in the report, Basic Income: Some Policy Options for Canada, meets these overall goals.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Ontario Should Streamline Path Off Welfare With More Carrot, Less Stick

Friday, June 5th, 2020

The report recommends: Reducing the cost of working through less punitive benefit claw-back rates; and higher exemptions for earned employment income while on the program… Ensuring appropriate work requirements and support… Placing supplemental benefits outside social assistance… Shifting the focus in disability support programs from the inability to work to the ability to work.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


Why do provinces often confiscate federal benefits from people who clearly need them?

Saturday, May 23rd, 2020

Taken together, as many as 52,000 people on social assistance receive federal and provincial benefits that are subject to complete clawbacks… Those clawbacks poured about $34 million into provincial coffers in April… Ontario isn’t ready to give any of that money back to people such as Demerse by treating EI the same as CERB during the pandemic… it may be time to consider uploading social assistance to the federal level and leave provinces to continue offering supports such as employment training, prescription drugs, dental and vision care for low-income residents

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


« Older Entries |