Posts Tagged ‘economy’

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Lessons from Ontario’s Basic Income Pilot

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

Michael Mendelson looks at Ontario’s experience to offer lessons on how to – and how not to – set up future Basic Income trials. The report focuses in particular on three aspects of the pilot in which the experimental design fell short: lack of a “saturation” site, problems of enrollment, and use of the income tax system to test recipients’ income… The author also suggests a five-step process for governments considering another Basic Income experiment…

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Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


Liberals are the best choice for Canada

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

… despite the failings of the Liberals, this is the time to focus on what’s truly important in the long run… to make sure the wealth is more evenly shared. It cut taxes on the middle class, raised them on the wealthy and directed a lot more support to families with the new Canada Child Benefit… A re-elected Liberal government would also add to the child benefit that has been so vital to reducing poverty. It would finally put a tax on Big Tech companies that haven’t been paying their share. And, very importantly, it would stick to its plan to reduce carbon emissions

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Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


The tax cuts you might vote for, but might not notice

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

Would someone earning over $60,000 notice that they got another $420 a year by 2023 through the Conservative Party’s Universal Tax Cut? … if someone handed you $420 in 2023, you’d notice. But that’s not how this tax cut is going to be delivered. It’ll be incremental… Surely there must be a better way to spend over $5.5 billion a year. Couldn’t this money be better spent on healthcare, housing, infrastructure, and/or paying down the deficit?

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The (Conservative) platform that dare not speak its name

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

Scaling back infrastructure spending could have consequences, but they won’t be immediate, and they may be hard for voters to spot… the Conservatives are raising taxes. Yes, really. They’re promising a 3-per-cent tax on foreign social-media platforms, search engines and online marketplaces, inspired by similar levies in Europe… The Conservatives would also give the Canada Revenue Agency $750-million a year to figure out who isn’t paying as much tax as they should.

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It’s time for federal leaders to focus on inequality

Monday, October 14th, 2019

… there’s a real problem when the benefits of wealth and opportunity are not shared by everyone…. while unemployment is the lowest it’s been in decades, the jobs are increasingly not very good ones… When the federal parties talk about jobs on the campaign trail, it needs to be a conversation about good jobs. When they talk about making life more affordable, they should be clear about who they’re talking about and how they’ll deliver. The Vital Signs report is a depressing but timely reminder that income and wealth are highly co-related with race, where people were born, and where they live now.

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Posted in Equality Debates | No Comments »


First and foremost, the homeless need housing

Monday, October 14th, 2019

Despite some notable success stories, most people don’t magically get better when housing is available… people with severe mental-health issues, substance-use disorders and the other illnesses and social challenges that come along with them need a lot of support… Housing first is a way of saying we haven’t given up on people and on the belief that homelessness can be, if not eliminated, at least managed more effectively and humanely.

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Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


It’s a No-Brainer — Tax the Billionaires!

Monday, October 14th, 2019

TheTyee.ca – Opinion 9 Oct 2019.   Michal Rozworski , TheTyee.ca Michal Rozworski is an economist, writer and author (with Leigh Phillips) of The People’s Republic of Walmart. He is a research associate with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. A wealth tax wouldn’t just bring in revenue. It would curb the out-of-control political power of the […]

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To close the wage gap, focus on child care

Saturday, October 12th, 2019

Canada could add $150 billion to its economy over the next eight years if more women entered and advanced in the workplace. That’s exactly what research shows universal, affordable child care helps women do. Child care is the most effective way to close the wage gap, but it’s about more than that. It’s also about reducing poverty, increasing employment, helping families and growing the economy.

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The Affordability Crisis and the 2019 Election

Friday, October 11th, 2019

Canadians have a general feeling of ‘affordability anxiety’ leading into the federal election. For this reason, the Broadbent Institute has created a series of fact sheets that look into three major issues effecting affordability — housing, healthcare and taxes, during the federal election… each fact sheet will include information on a topic as it relates to affordability and the commitments and/or solutions each party has put forward.

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Indigenous group leader says it is planning to buy majority stake in Trans Mountain pipeline project

Friday, October 11th, 2019

The leader of an Indigenous group seeking to buy a 51-per-cent stake in the Trans Mountain oil pipeline project says he is well-positioned to negotiate with the political party that wins the Oct. 21 federal election… Mr. LeBourdais said he plans to line up two banks as key lenders and also hopes to obtain federal loan guarantees, noting that… the expansion could cost at least $7.4-billion.

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Posted in Inclusion Debates | No Comments »


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