• ‘As permanent as you can get’: Ford addresses funding cut for post-secondary campuses

    The funding cuts for three university satellite campuses announced by the province last week are “as permanent as you can get,” according to Premier Doug Ford, who spoke about the projects for the first time since they were cancelled… The premier, however, seemed to leave the door open to future funding, once the government has grappled with its deficit and debt.

  • Statement on government-mandated free speech policies from the Ontario Universities and Colleges Coalition

    There is no free speech crisis on Ontario campuses. This is an ideological fiction advanced by the government to justify interference in the academic governance and autonomy of Ontario’s universities and colleges. It is telling that the government did not consult with any sector stakeholders before announcing the new requirement for campus “free speech” policies and disciplinary measures tied to possible cuts to university and college funding.

  • Ottawa working hard on child care and early learning, minister says

    … last June’s agreement represented an important re-engagement by the federal government. It demonstrated that we understood the need for all Canadian families to have access to early learning and child care that is affordable, flexible and inclusive, as well as the important leadership role the federal government must play in helping Canadian children get the best possible start in life… the multilateral framework represents an aspirational goal, and is part of a long-term vision for early learning and child care that is coherent with universality.

  • Why Canadian medical students should be offered free tuition

    The move has three principal goals: Free future doctors of the crushing debt load many are saddled with; Give graduates the freedom to pursue lower-paying careers in family medicine and pediatrics rather than high-paying specialties such as cardiology (which some do to deal with debt); Attract the best and brightest students rather than just those who can afford medical school and, in the process, a student body that better reflects the society, in terms of race, gender, ethnicity and socio-economic status.

  • Think education in Ontario doesn’t need to be protected as a human right? Think again

    If you have access to education, you are more likely to know your rights, and know how to advocate for yourself and for others… By framing education as a fundamental human right, we place the emphasis on education for all without discrimination; the obligation of states to protect, respect and fulfil this right; and the need for accountability mechanisms when people cannot realize their right.

  • It’s time to merge Ontario’s two school systems

    Consolidation of school systems will save money by eliminating service duplication, and it will eradicate enrolment competition between the two systems. And contrary to a widely held perception, denominational schools are not necessarily protected by Canada’s Constitution, as previously demonstrated in the provinces of Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Québec.

  • Ontario cancels curriculum rewrite that would boost Indigenous content

    Although the new government of Premier Doug Ford says it did not order the cancellation, a statement from Education Minister Lisa Thompson suggests the move was made by the bureaucracy to cut costs… the ministry cancelled three curriculum writing sessions, including those on: TRC curriculum revisions, American Sign Language, and Indigenous languages in kindergarten… The ministry “will continue to move ahead with” the curriculum revisions related to the TRC… but did not indicate when that would happen.

  • Education reform must be on the table in Ontario

    In 2018-19, Ontario will spend $29.1 billion on K-12 education, representing one-fifth of all program spending in the province… That places Ontario third in per student spending among the provinces, behind only Alberta and Saskatchewan, and more than 20% higher than neighbouring Quebec… Many Ontarians are likely unaware of how unique Ontario’s K-12 education system is compared to the other provinces. Ontario is one of only three provinces that deliver religious education

  • Students in poorer neighbourhoods may miss out on ‘vital programs,’ report says

    The findings, based on a survey of 1,244 principals from across the province found that elementary schools where parents are better educated and have more money are twice as likely to have a music teacher as schools where parental education is considered low. It found similar trends for specialist teachers in visual arts and drama… Research shows high quality child care boosts children’s social, emotional and literacy development as well as long term learning and success

  • What the 2018 election results mean for Ontario’s professors and academic librarians

    The Ontario PC platform was silent on almost all postsecondary issues, and did not provide a plan for postsecondary education in Ontario. It did not include any reference to addressing underfunding for postsecondary education or the need for a faculty renewal strategy in the province. However, the platform statement did emphasize the PC party’s belief that Ontario has a “spending problem”. Such a statement should be of grave concern when it comes to public funding for all public services, including postsecondary education.