Archive for the ‘Economy/Employment’ Category

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What if the long-expected boomer retirement boom never happens? The trend is in that direction

Wednesday, July 10th, 2019

… with lifespans now much longer than was the norm a few decades ago, both working and earning incomes for an eventual retirement are no doubt looked at differently than used to be the case. As well, workers with higher levels of education are more apt to be in the labour market as they age, as compared with those with lower levels of education… older workers may find themselves working, but on contracts or in part-time jobs, which may not be their first choice.

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Jim Stanford on Uber and the future of precarious work: ‘It isn’t inevitable’

Monday, July 8th, 2019

… we should be continuing to invest in skills and the knowledge infrastructure… But we also need to be actively nurturing the jobs that people with those skills can most productively do… They only came to Canada because smart policy interventions brought them to Canada. We hustled for them, and we put in place rules. We said to a company like Boeing, for example, ‘you want to sell a bunch of extremely expensive aircraft to Air Canada? Well, you’re going to have to produce something in Canada.’

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Employment Insurance isn’t working for everyone

Sunday, July 7th, 2019

… working-age adults don’t need income support for as long as they can remain active in the labour force. If that was ever true, it is increasingly not the case… Recognizing the changing nature of the labour market, and ensuring systems are in place to support those who do that work is key to building a more inclusive and resilient economy where all workers and their families are protected against hardship. We can’t predict the future of work, but we can prepare for it.

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Beware gurus with plans to reinvent conservatism

Thursday, July 4th, 2019

Protectionism, then, does not protect our workers against other countries’, nor even workers against consumers, though that is nearer the truth. In reality, it protects some Canadian workers against other Canadian workers. Which workers fall into which group is decided not by how hard either works or the quality or price of what they produce, but by which can most successfully lobby politicians… The conflict… between the interests of consumers and producers, is ultimately illusory.

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The world needs more Greta Thunbergs

Friday, June 28th, 2019

Ms. Thunberg began by offering some sobering perspectives on the greatest plague facing mankind, such as the fact that roughly 100 companies are responsible for emitting just over 70 per cent of our total carbon-dioxide emissions. And the fact that the richest 10 per cent of the world’s population emit about half of the planet’s total emissions and the wealthiest 1 per cent emit more than the poorest 50 per cent… “People who have a lot of power. People who consume enormous amounts of stuff, who often fly around the world, sometimes in private jets.”

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What is the problem to which creating a wealth tax is a solution?

Tuesday, June 25th, 2019

The stock of wealth in a country is typically many multiples of the flow of income; its concentration in a few hands is likewise greater. The top one per cent earn roughly 20 per cent of America’s income, but control 40 per cent of its wealth. They also pay 40 per cent of the income tax, but never mind: by taxing their wealth as well, vast sums of money could ostensibly be raised from relatively few people, and at relatively low rates.

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Canadian corporations may have avoided $25-billion or more in taxes in 2018: PBO

Friday, June 21st, 2019

Canadian companies transferred more than $1.6-trillion in 2018 to low-tax countries known as offshore financial centres and conduits to these nations, according to a new report by the Parliamentary Budget Officer… if just 10 per cent of that amount was transferred to avoid taxes, that would mean Ottawa lost out on $25-billion in federal revenue. Billions more would have been lost in provincial corporate taxes.

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The Ford government’s proposed wage-cap legislation: Debunking the myths, outlining the facts

Tuesday, June 18th, 2019

The Ford government has introduced sweeping wage legislation that will undermine free and fair collective bargaining under the pretense of a fiscal crisis. The reality is that Ontario faces a revenue problem and not a spending problem, as Ford continues to falsely claim… the Ontario government has the lowest per capita program spending in the country. This includes spending on essential public services such as long-term care, childcare, education, transit, water, and infrastructure.

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Canadian companies failed to pay billions of taxes owed, new CRA report reveals

Tuesday, June 18th, 2019

Canadian corporations failed to pay between $9.4 billion and $11.4 billion in taxes in 2014, according to the first comprehensive analysis of the country’s corporate “tax gap” — the difference between taxes legally owed and those collected — being released today by the Canada Revenue Agency. That means 24 to 29 per cent of all the corporate income tax legally due in Canada didn’t get paid that year.

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Austerity and the Decline Of The Collective

Monday, June 10th, 2019

1. Austerity is toxic. 2. It is built on a lie, and on a withered idea of freedom and a hollowed out notion of citizenship. 3. Austerity is self-perpetuating, trapping us, stunting our political imagination. 4. We nevertheless do have alternatives… big change is urgent, and bold is exactly what’s needed if we are to meet our challenges and break out of the austerity trap. 5. A new generation of leaders is giving us reason for hope, though clearly there’s no reason for complacency.

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