Archive for the ‘Economy/Employment’ Category

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Canada ignored its gigantic money laundering problem for years — and lawyers fanned the flames

Monday, April 8th, 2019

In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada made a huge mistake when it constitutionally exempted lawyers from a newly minted Proceeds of Crime and Terrorist Financing Act and Regulation (the ‘Proceeds of Crime Regime’). This followed arguments by the Federation of Law Societies of Canada that laws violated solicitor-client privilege and that the legal profession alone had the responsibility for policing itself. This puts lawyers above the law compared to other self-regulating professionals… This is foolishness.

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Don’t believe a carbon tax can effect huge change? Just ask British Columbia

Friday, April 5th, 2019

B.C. strengthened its carbon tax on April 1, raising the rate by $5 per tonne to $40 per tonne… Since introducing pollution pricing in 2008, per capita emissions in B.C. are down by 14 per cent, while the economy has grown by 26 per cent… B.C.’s booming clean-tech industry is a prime example of the benefits of pricing pollution…

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Premiers who fight carbon tax ignore climate change at their peril

Friday, April 5th, 2019

Scientists and economists have been telling us for years that climate change is an issue for our health and our planet and an opportunity for our economy. Yet some Conservative politicians deny this… When farmers lose their crops like they did this summer, when your neighbours’ basements are flooded because of quicker snowmelts and more rain, when jobs start to leave because our economies haven’t kept up with the clean demand — will you have a plan then?

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New Ontario law allows less pay for overtime

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019

Time-and-a-half pay in Ontario is usually mandatory when employees work more than 44 hours a week, unless an overtime-averaging agreement in place. Under Bill 66, employers will have expanded use of these agreements and will be able to average workers’ hours over the course of a month rather than two weeks, resulting in less overtime pay… the new measures will encourage employers to assign erratic schedules to workers in order to minimize overtime payments.

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Ontario’s low-income tax credit gives fewer benefits than minimum-wage hike, watchdog says

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019

The Ontario government’s new low-income tax credit provides fewer benefits than the cancelled minimum-wage increase, and will add $1.9-billion to the deficit, according to a new report from the province’s fiscal watchdog… On average, minimum-wage workers will receive about $400 less per year under the new plan… Under the proposed minimum-wage increase, 1.3 million people would have benefited, and received a net after-tax benefit of $810, the report said.

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Canada sees 300,000 new immigrants — the largest influx in a century

Saturday, March 23rd, 2019

The increase in international migration has helped fuel a surge in employment — even amid sluggish indicators in other parts of the economy…It’s been a welcome tailwind for an economy coping with aging demographics and other drags like record household debt… The strong immigration numbers also make up for slower natural population growth.

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Employment changes would mean working more and earning less overtime pay

Sunday, March 17th, 2019

The key changes proposed by the PCs concern ministry of labour oversight of excess hours of work and overtime averaging agreements, and could result in many Ontarians working more hours and earning less overtime pay… An inevitable result will be the proliferation of overtime averaging agreements in workplaces where no justifying circumstances are present, and employers are simply seeking to cut costs at their employees’ expense. Employees are typically told to sign these agreements at their time of hire, and overwhelmingly do so for fear of being passed up for a candidate who will.

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Taxing the rich and finding the sweet spot in the tax debate

Sunday, March 17th, 2019

… soaking the top 1 per cent with higher income taxes does not lead to a massive change in government revenues because there simply are not that many of them… Rather than getting caught up in simple fixes to tax rates, Canadians would do well to get behind a review of our tax system to ensure that all its parts – from taxation of small businesses and corporations, to the treatment of capital gains and dividends – helps Canada grow faster.

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Time for Canada to tax foreign digital corporations

Saturday, March 16th, 2019

… other countries are coming up with alternatives that apply taxes to the revenues of large digital corporations that won’t necessarily be applied to consumers… In addition to a sales tax, Canada can even the playing field by getting rid of the current deductibility companies receive for foreign internet advertising… A digital tax would go a long way in balancing the playing field for our companies and protecting the thousands of Canadian jobs that contribute to our democracy.

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What to do about housing?

Friday, March 15th, 2019

A policy that increases supply will lower prices and increase quantities, improving both household debt and affordability… The reality is that plenty of land is earmarked for development, but we often lack the necessary infrastructure. Without water, sewage, and highways, why would a developer build? Getting these infrastructure projects going, in tandem with other levels of government, should be job Number 1.

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