Posts Tagged ‘globalization’

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Money has never been cheaper. Should Ottawa be borrowing more?

Wednesday, July 31st, 2019

Ultralow interest rates are a problem, but also an opportunity. Borrowing has never been cheaper. If the federal government were to increase borrowing, only for a short period and only to fund one-off items such as new education facilities or transit infrastructure, it could finance that at very low costs, locked in for decades.

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Why you shouldn’t expect to see populism take root in Canada

Friday, July 26th, 2019

Middle class incomes aren’t stagnating in Canada: they’re up a third after inflation from where they were 20 years ago. The share of income going to the “top 1 per cent” is falling, not rising, here, and has been for more than a decade; at 7.3 per cent, after-tax, it is at its lowest level since 1996. Poverty levels are the lowest on record.

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Much is at stake in the contest between pluralism and populism

Sunday, July 21st, 2019

Our history records some serious failures. They serve as tough reminders that our pluralism is far from perfect. It cannot be taken for granted. Indeed, it is fragile and demands our constant vigilance and hard work… We must practice the art of inclusion and accommodation — to make room for one another. To reach out. To listen to each other. To bridge differences. To try very hard to understand one another… Canada is now and ever will be a precious work-in-progress.

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Why Canadians need to wake up about populism

Thursday, July 11th, 2019

Ordered populism… has four key conditions: A declining middle class, wage stagnation and hyper-concentration of wealth at the very top of the system; Major shifts in social values which see more progressive values displacing traditional social conservative values which… produce a cultural backlash by those seeing themselves falling victim to loss of identity and privilege; A growing sense of external threat…; Declining trust in public institutions plus a rise in ideological polarization. All those conditions are present in Canada. They predominate among less-educated males

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Jim Stanford on Uber and the future of precarious work: ‘It isn’t inevitable’

Monday, July 8th, 2019

… we should be continuing to invest in skills and the knowledge infrastructure… But we also need to be actively nurturing the jobs that people with those skills can most productively do… They only came to Canada because smart policy interventions brought them to Canada. We hustled for them, and we put in place rules. We said to a company like Boeing, for example, ‘you want to sell a bunch of extremely expensive aircraft to Air Canada? Well, you’re going to have to produce something in Canada.’

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How Canadians can strike a better balance between the environment and the economy

Sunday, July 7th, 2019

… here are six suggestions for restoring balance to the environment-economy debate, which feel particularly necessary in a federal election year when many participants will be surely tempted to succumb to the short-term benefits of simplistic polarization.

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Employment Insurance isn’t working for everyone

Sunday, July 7th, 2019

… working-age adults don’t need income support for as long as they can remain active in the labour force. If that was ever true, it is increasingly not the case… Recognizing the changing nature of the labour market, and ensuring systems are in place to support those who do that work is key to building a more inclusive and resilient economy where all workers and their families are protected against hardship. We can’t predict the future of work, but we can prepare for it.

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Beware gurus with plans to reinvent conservatism

Thursday, July 4th, 2019

Protectionism, then, does not protect our workers against other countries’, nor even workers against consumers, though that is nearer the truth. In reality, it protects some Canadian workers against other Canadian workers. Which workers fall into which group is decided not by how hard either works or the quality or price of what they produce, but by which can most successfully lobby politicians… The conflict… between the interests of consumers and producers, is ultimately illusory.

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The real carbon tax is the money provinces are spending on lawyers

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019

… the Ontario court also said carbon pricing is not a tax because the money collected by Ottawa will be sent back to the provinces, with nearly all of it going to individual taxpayers, and the remainder to schools, hospitals, municipalities and small and medium-sized businesses in the five provinces on which it is or will be imposed… The Ontario ruling also makes the case for why a federal regime is necessary.

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Andrew Scheer’s Real Bad Climate Plan

Saturday, June 29th, 2019

‘Sixty pages! 11,000 words!’ And designed to show voters he really doesn’t care. Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer’s climate policy sets a new benchmark for dishonest political posturing. Scheer’s “A Real Plan to Protect Our Environment” was served up to counter criticism that the party had no climate plan.
Instead, it proved the critics right… only eight per cent of Conservative voters identified it as an important issue; it ranked ninth among their concerns. (Only income inequality was rated a lesser concern.) So doing anything real on climate change would irk the Conservatives’ base.

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