Posts Tagged ‘pharmaceutical’

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Charting the Path to National Pharmacare in Canada

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

… a federally financed, regulated and administered pharmacare program… is constitutionally feasible because of the federal government’s current jurisdiction over drug safety, price regulation and patent protection. While it is generally assumed that federalism and provincial jurisdiction over health stand in the way of a federal government public single payer program, the provinces have supported this option in the past, with the caveat that special arrangements may have to be made for Quebec.

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Tilting at windmills won’t solve our health-care woes

Monday, February 4th, 2019

Almost all health services are contracted out to private providers – doctors (most of whom are corporations), hospitals (which are not-for-profit corporations), pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies, device manufacturers (for-profit corporations), home care and long-term care facilities (a mix of non-profit and for-profit corporations) and so on…. we have the least-universal universal health-insurance system in the world. More than 30 per cent of care is paid for privately.

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40% of Ontario full-time post-secondary students granted free tuition, CBC analysis shows

Monday, February 4th, 2019

“How many of them were able to quit a part-time job and focus solely on their studies because of this grant? How many of them didn’t need to access mental health resources this year because they weren’t worried about making ends meet?” … although 24 per cent more university students and 27 per cent more college students were issued financial aid in the 2017-18 academic year, the total number of students accessing higher education for the first time stayed virtually the same.

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Improving OHIP+ for lower- and modest-income Ontarians

Wednesday, January 30th, 2019

The Ontario government’s proposed changes to OHIP+ indicate that families with private prescription drug coverage will be required to pay out-of-pocket for any costs not covered by their plans. This will have a burdensome impact on working families with low incomes.

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Pharmacare and Politics

Friday, January 25th, 2019

Rather than going for an expensive single-payer model, we think Ottawa would be far better off with a “gap-filling” model. Under that approach, each province and territory would create a public pharmacare plan that would automatically cover anyone who wasn’t already covered by an existing public plan, or by a government-approved private plan. As an inducement, the federal government could offer a modest enhancement of the Canada Health Transfer, or offer to pay part of the incremental cost that each province would incur by offering such a plan.

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Let’s make 2019 the year Canada finally gets pharmacare (2)

Saturday, January 12th, 2019

Canada’s dysfunctional non-system of non-universal drug insurance goes into the ring with one big advantage: It’s the status quo. It exists, through hundreds of government programs and thousands of workplace arrangements and collective agreements. Canadians will have to be persuaded that reform will improve their existing coverage, or at least leave it unchanged.

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Fate of Ontario Drug Benefit could define federal election

Friday, January 11th, 2019

Premier Doug Ford is… likely to gut the Ontario Drug Benefit seniors’ program. How the federal Liberals and NDP respond to this challenge will define their parties’ visions for the country and determine the election results… Ford inherited a $6-plus billion deficit and he’s blown that up with tax reductions and lost law suits… Cutting the ODB seniors’ program and implementing a Quebec or Manitoba-style plan could save $2 billion in one fell swoop.

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What many Canadians don’t know about the Canada Health Act

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

Public funding is still focused on hospital-based approaches to treating disabilities and chronic conditions, instead of home-care methods, which are much more cost-effective… Prescription drugs provided outside hospital settings are also not covered by the Canada Health Act and require out-of-pocket spending. In 2017, approximately 700,000 Canadians had no prescription drug coverage, while an estimated 3.6 million had inadequate coverage to afford necessary medications.

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Let’s make 2019 the year Canada finally gets pharmacare

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

If you’re hospitalized and you’re given prescription meds, it’s free. But once you walk out of the hospital with a prescription to fill, you may be on your own. Coverage is a mix of private insurance and out-of-pocket spending, with the provinces and territories filling some of the gaps with a grab bag of local programs, each unique to its jurisdiction, for groups such as seniors and the poor… Government programs are limited and selective, creating a safety net that’s filled with holes.

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Free prescriptions for many children and young adults in Ontario set to end in March

Saturday, January 5th, 2019

Under the new plan, children and young adults will continue to get free prescriptions if they or their parents do not have private health insurance coverage. Otherwise, private insurance plans become the “first payer” for prescription medicines… At issue is how pharmacists will be able to verify whether customers under 25 have private coverage, or deductibles or co-payments… At drug stores, pharmacists will ask customers if they have insurance and check their coverage online.

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