Posts Tagged ‘pharmaceutical’

« Older Entries |

The Government of Canada announces the creation of the Canadian Drug Agency

Wednesday, December 20th, 2023

The CDA will build on CADTH’s existing mandate… to include new work streams including: Improving the appropriate prescribing and use of medications… Increasing pan-Canadian data collection and expanding access to drug and treatment data… and, Reducing drug system duplication and lack of coordination that causes expensive inefficiencies and pressures… Once the CDA is operational, it will take on a greater role in the drug system to ensure Canadians can have better health outcomes and access the medications…

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


Financed by Canada, medical breakthrough helps Big Pharma, not global poor

Thursday, December 14th, 2023

Canadian taxpayers played a key role in funding the technology that made mRNA vaccines possible. Yet Canadian authorities took no steps to ensure that the resulting vaccines would be made accessible to people who needed them rather than simply becoming enormous profit-generators for Big Pharma… Today’s system, which prioritizes private profits and intellectual property rights, is in sharp contrast with the system in place for six decades when Canada had publicly-owned Connaught Labs.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Debates | No Comments »


National pharmacare dream dying as Trudeau appears ready to cave to Big Pharma

Thursday, November 16th, 2023

… pharmacare would increase Canadian government spending by the equivalent of about one-third of one percentage point of GDP… Even so, politicians seem willing to conjure up the threat of a credit downgrade, scaring Canadians into falsely believing universal pharmacare is unaffordable. (Instead, the Liberals may propose a smaller means-tested program.) … don’t be fooled into believing it’s because we can’t afford it.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


National Pharmacare – Time to Get on With It

Wednesday, November 15th, 2023

National pharmacare is overdue. In 21st century healthcare, drugs are not a luxury nor a discretionary add-on. They are an essential part of healthcare delivery that should be covered universally. Canadians have already waited too long, and far too many of them don’t get the medication they need to stay healthy and manage chronic disease. The federal government can act as a catalyst by making a credible and responsible financial commitment… to improve public plan coverage.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


Ontario’s registered nurses are getting new prescribing powers — and some doctors aren’t happy about it

Tuesday, November 7th, 2023

Registered nurses will be able to independently prescribe and administer some medications — such as those for smoking cessation, immunizations and topical anesthetics for pain relief and wound care… Nurses who wish to participate must complete additional specialized education, for which registration is expected to begin in January… the change… will help make it easier for patients to get care while also reducing wait times at community clinics and hospitals.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


National Pharmacare – Time to Get on With It

Friday, November 3rd, 2023

The federal government can act as a catalyst by making a credible and responsible financial commitment that opens the door to joint work with provinces and territories to improve public plan coverage. The PEI agreement is a good model and federal legislation can help to create a positive foundation for collaboration. The political window to move things forward is open, but not for long.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


The Liberals have a chance to make headway on pharmacare. They should seize the opportunity

Thursday, November 2nd, 2023

Hoskins had recommended that a universal program begin with essential medicines, which would initially cost the government $3.5 billion to $4.5 billion. The NDP insists on a single-payer universal system but acknowledges it can’t be done in one fell swoop. It has demanded that timelines for progress be enshrined in legislation. If all this leads to a “foundational” piece of legislation and a firm road map going forward, that will be welcome and significant progress in a time of economic uncertainty.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Ontario plans to expand midwives’ prescribing power

Tuesday, October 31st, 2023

Ontario is planning to expand the list of drugs that midwives can prescribe and administer, including allowing them to prescribe birth control… A spokesperson for Health Minister Sylvia Jones said the ministry is reviewing further scope-of-practice changes and is rolling them out based on advice from health-care partners.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


Budget officer estimates cost and savings of single-payer pharmacare

Thursday, October 19th, 2023

The PBO says, “Upon the implementation of a single-payer universal drug plan… we estimate the incremental cost to the public sector (that is, federal and provincial governments) combined to be $11.2 billion in 2024-25, increasing to $14.4 billion in 2027.” In terms of the economy as a whole, the PBO estimates cost savings on drug expenditures of $1.4 billion in 2024-25, rising to $2.2 billion in 2027-28.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Politicians come and go, but the clock is now ticking on long-promised pharmacare

Thursday, October 12th, 2023

Federal funding of essential medicines will, of course, cost the federal government, since it would foot the bill for all of those essential medicines instead of the provinces paying much of the costs. But the $7.6 billion price tag is a bargain. All told, a program of this kind could save provinces, employers and families $12 billion in reduced prescription drug costs. The $4 billion in direct savings for provinces alone is enough to entice even the most recalcitrant of provincial governments.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


« Older Entries |