Posts Tagged ‘pharmaceutical’

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Universal, Single-Payer Public Pharmacare in Canada: An Overview of the Proposed Model

Wednesday, July 17th, 2019

This bulletin summarizes the key recommendations, which include implementation beginning in 2020; an ability for provinces and territories to opt in; new federal legislation and fiscal transfers to the provinces and territories; a $100 cap on annual household out of pocket spending; a national formulary covering essential medicine by 2022 and comprehensive coverage by 2027; and a dedicated process for assessment and coverage for expensive drugs for rare diseases.

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If ‘pharmacare’ means ‘give us billions,’ the provinces are interested

Wednesday, July 17th, 2019

… while they agree it would be great if Canada had a national drug plan, they want it to be under their control, designed according to standards developed in each individual province, with only the money coming from Ottawa… They also want to be able to opt out, while keeping the money as if they’d remained within the plan. They didn’t say what they’d do with the money: that would be up to each province.

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Ontario wants to expand midwives’ ability to prescribe medications

Tuesday, July 9th, 2019

Ontario wants to give midwives across the province the ability to prescribe a wider variety medications, a move those in the profession say could help improve patient care. Health Minister Christine Elliott said Monday that consultations are underway to expand midwives’ scope of practice with the body that regulates the profession. She said the province wants to enable midwives to use their education and training more effectively.

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Make pharmacare a priority in the federal election

Tuesday, July 9th, 2019

The upcoming election debate on this issue should address key implementation issues including: Identifying the goalposts and the mechanism for achieving the desired outcome. The role of the federal government, subnational governments and the private sector. Who pays for the incremental costs and how will it be financed. The mechanism to get buy-ins from all subnational governments. A universal system only works if all subnational governments participate in it.

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Big hurdles remain in pharmacare implementation plan

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019

The national pharmacare advisory council’s ambitious report presents a staged, eight-year plan to reduce drug costs and make public drug coverage universal with the participation of the provinces. But there are major stumbling blocks ahead. The report is silent on how the initiative would be paid for; it proposes a convoluted and unequal federal funding transfer to encourage provincial and territorial participation; and, it makes potentially naïve assumptions about how private insurers will react to the expansion of public drug insurance.

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Time for Ontario to make drug company payments public

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2019

When pharmaceutical companies dole out millions of dollars to doctors, hospitals, universities and others working in the public health care system, it should be done in a public way to maintain trust that it’s all above board. And not just for 10 big drug companies, but all of them. Ontario has already passed legislation to make that happen — if only the Doug Ford government would enact the regulations to bring it into force…

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Prioritizing fundamental human rights can help us find the clarity we need for good public policy

Thursday, June 27th, 2019

Ultimately, good public policy requires balancing social, economic, fiscal and political considerations. We can get clarity on the best path to pursue if we decide that future public policies prioritize and articulate the dignities and rights that we think all Canadians should be afforded by virtue of being a human being, and not because of where we work.

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To bolster health, would basic income — not pharmacare — make more sense?

Tuesday, June 25th, 2019

… shouldn’t the priority of policy-makers be to ensure that all Canadians can afford necessities such as food and housing, not just prescription drugs? … Affordable sickness care is important, especially if you’re sick. But the way to keep people healthier longer is to ensure that they have a decent income, a roof over their heads, healthy food, a good education, a sound physical environment and sense of belonging.

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Yes, to national pharmacare – because we already paid for it

Tuesday, June 25th, 2019

We are paying, in effect, three times: through federal research grants, through disease-focused charities, and then at the pharmacy. A national pharmacare program could change this if… the cost of a drug over the life of its patent was calculated to recognize the public support its development received. Manufacturers would submit a funding history with a tentative pricing. A fair rate of return would be permitted for the life of a patent based on that information.

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Why universal pharmacare will help get Canada’s drug costs under control — and why Big Pharma hates it

Saturday, June 22nd, 2019

It might be more accurate to say we can’t afford to go without it… The Hoskins report estimates an annual savings of about $5 billion in total drug spending once universal pharmacare is fully implemented… And it would strengthen employers’ ability to hire and properly compensate employees. Employer contributions to drug plans generally reduce worker pay.

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