Posts Tagged ‘crime prevention’

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It’s time for Canada to ban handguns

Monday, April 22nd, 2019

… semi-automatic rifles that can accommodate large magazines ought to be banned in Canada. The same can be said of handguns. They have no place in a peaceful society. Handguns are designed to be concealable and deadly. They are semi-automatics; shooters can fire a round with each pull of the trigger without having to manually recock their weapon. They can be legally purchased in Canada with a nine-round magazine, which means they can do a lot of damage quickly, just like a semi-automatic rifle, although without the same accuracy and firepower.

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Did Jody Wilson-Raybould understand her role as attorney-general?

Wednesday, April 17th, 2019

Politically accountable oversight in ensuring that the public interest is properly taken into account isn’t anathema to the rule of law. The attorney-general’s power to superintend prosecutions is an integral part of our justice system… The DPP is expressly mandated to notify the attorney-general if a case “raises important questions of general interest.” … the attorney-general appears to have reflexively deferred to the DPP and abdicated her responsibility for vigorous and independent oversight.

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A forensic accountant’s take on the Ontario budget

Saturday, April 13th, 2019

Ontario taxes more and spends more, per capita, than Ottawa… Before annual debt costs, both Ontario and Ottawa are just treading water… Ontario has a $4.1 billion operating surplus ($280 per person). Ottawa’s operating surplus is $9.4 billion ($252 per Canadian)… Ontario — spending cuts for many, more money for a few… Among the 19 losing ministries are: … Children and Community Services… Environment… Indigenous Affairs… Training, Colleges and Universities

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The legal advice Wilson-Raybould should have taken

Saturday, April 13th, 2019

… the prime minister tried to persuade her to hire a lawyer to give her further legal advice in an attempt to find a solution to the standoff between them. He proposed the most distinguished lawyer in Canada, the former chief justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, the Honourable Beverley McLachlin. Not a bad offer. She refused… I think I know what advice she might have gotten from McLachlin. And that explains why she didn’t want, and never accepted, that offer of legal advice.

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Canada ignored its gigantic money laundering problem for years — and lawyers fanned the flames

Monday, April 8th, 2019

In 2015, the Supreme Court of Canada made a huge mistake when it constitutionally exempted lawyers from a newly minted Proceeds of Crime and Terrorist Financing Act and Regulation (the ‘Proceeds of Crime Regime’). This followed arguments by the Federation of Law Societies of Canada that laws violated solicitor-client privilege and that the legal profession alone had the responsibility for policing itself. This puts lawyers above the law compared to other self-regulating professionals… This is foolishness.

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What people are getting wrong about this entire silly affair [SNC-Lavalin]

Friday, April 5th, 2019

… the option to Canadian prosecutors to impose a fine rather than lay a criminal charge is legitimate and sensible and the media and opposition should stop referring to it as a sleazy, partisan escape hatch for the naughty corporate friends of the Liberal Party… The argument that Trudeau had no right to review the case is spurious: he has an absolute obligation to discharge the duties of his office.

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IN THE NATIONAL INTEREST(S)

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019

“The national economic interest” is not to be considered by the prosecution in deciding whether a prosecutor may negotiate a remediation (deferred prosecution) agreement… the purposes of the remediation sections added to our Criminal Code? There are six, one being: “to reduce the negative consequences of the wrongdoing for persons – employees, customers, pensioners and others – who did not engage in the wrongdoing while holding responsible those who did …”

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New Zealand’s gun ban shows the way. Will Canada be as bold?

Saturday, March 23rd, 2019

Will Canada be as brave as New Zealand, and ban the types of guns that facilitate mass killing of humans? It would take an enormous act of political will. It would take a critical mass of people of to advocate against the weapons. It would involve standing up to the country’s vocal gun lobby… before the next tragedy has people sending their thoughts and prayers. It can be done. New Zealand has shown the way.

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What Canadians need to know about the SNC-Lavalin affair

Friday, March 22nd, 2019

It is important to remind Canadians that the justice committee is not a court. We are neither a tryer of fact or a jury… We need to formulate clear rules as to appropriate interactions with the attorney-general as relates to prosecutions and remediation agreement considerations.

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End solitary confinement, says Ontario human rights commissioner in wake of Adam Capay case

Wednesday, February 27th, 2019

Solitary confinement continues to be overused in Ontario correctional facilities and should be phased out entirely, says one of the central figures responsible for drawing attention to the plight of Adam Capay, the 26-year-old Indigenous man who spent more than four years in isolation… [The (OHRC) Commissioner found]… details emerging from the Capay case “extremely troubling” and urging the government to end the practice of isolating prisoners for 22 or more hours a day.

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