Archive for the ‘Education’ Category

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Every child left behind: How education cuts fuel inequality

Friday, June 14th, 2019

… good fiscal sense includes eliminating inequalities that cost economies and challenge political stability. Stiglitz cites the OECD, which estimates that “in countries like the U.S., the U.K. and Italy, overall economic growth would have been six to nine percentage points higher in the past two decades had income inequality not risen.” And in a 2018 Gallup study, countries with greater income inequality, the Economist found, also report higher incidences of assault, theft and concerns about personal safety.

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No, professors shouldn’t collect a six-figure pension – on top of a six-figure salary

Friday, May 17th, 2019

Nearly one in 10 Ontario university professors is over the age of 65. As of 2016, these professors were earning, on average, $184,947 a year. Moreover, because federal legislation requires all taxpayers to start drawing down their retirement savings at the age of 71, septuagenarian professors can collect a six-figure pension on top of a six-figure salary… No one is stopping senior scholars from writing academic papers, or teaching ECON 101. The debate is over how much they should be paid for doing so.

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CAUT condemns Heritage report on copyright

Friday, May 17th, 2019

The Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT) is alarmed by recommendations released this week by the Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage regarding copyright law in Canada. The report, though produced by a committee mandated to take into consideration the broad range of stakeholder interests — including creators, the public, educators and students — focuses entirely on the interests of big publishers and their lobby groups.

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Students will suffer the real impact of Ford’s education cuts

Wednesday, May 15th, 2019

These cuts will hurt struggling students, gifted students and generally make school a lot less interesting for all students. That’s because fewer teachers doesn’t just mean fewer classes. It also means fewer coaches for sports teams and fewer people to run everything from chess club to the school yearbook… Cutting teachers and increasing class sizes means fewer options and positive experiences for high school students across the province.

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New proposal from Doug Ford government would force senior professors to work for no salary

Wednesday, May 15th, 2019

Under regulations proposed in the budget bill, the Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities would be given unprecedented power to unilaterally cut the salary of anyone employed at a postsecondary institution who is also drawing a pension. But in order to do so, the ministry would likely have to override collective agreements and essentially force professors who are still working past 71 to do so for no pay, except for the pension to which they’re already entitled. .

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Ford’s plan to eliminate teaching jobs gets a failing grade in new poll

Tuesday, May 7th, 2019

Even though the question echoed Ford’s insistence that no current teachers will lose their jobs, 62 per cent still opposed the change, with 23 per cent in favour and 15 per cent neither supporting or opposing or unsure… Similarly, those polled were not enthusiastic about the government’s plan to have high school students take four online classes over four years, with 57 per cent opposed…

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Universities shine a light on Ontario’s failing schools

Thursday, May 2nd, 2019

… pedagogues K-12 are often in denial of the problem, because they are themselves in thrall to the “self-esteem” zeitgeist… They are giving good grades to work that does not merit it, because of the prevailing “all must have prizes” culture they operate within… two-thirds of university students believe that if they’re “trying hard,” their grades should reflect their effort, not their actual achievement… One-third… felt they deserved a B grade just for attending most of a course’s classes.

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The Progressive Conservatives’ first budget targets Ontario’s universities

Monday, April 29th, 2019

… this budget delivered what OCUFA expected: a continued attack on workers’ rights, university autonomy and public services including postsecondary education, and needless cuts to public services, especially those aimed at low-income Ontarians… projected to be cut by $700 million, which mainly reflects a deep cut (over $670 million) to the Student Financial Assistance (OSAP) budget… The budget included several postsecondary-related announcements.

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Ontario faculty alarmed by proposal to overhaul university funding in provincial budget

Monday, April 15th, 2019

The government’s proposal is especially alarming as it promises to tie university funding to 10 unannounced metrics and ignores the reality that Ontario’s universities already receive the lowest per-student funding in Canada… “The government should be helping to create good jobs for faculty forced to work short-term precarious contracts and support students by reversing their decision to cut OSAP grants and attack student democracy.”

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“Revolutionary” new funding to shake up Ontario’s colleges and universities

Saturday, April 13th, 2019

Performance funding is popular in the United States, where about 29 states used it last year… The primary motivation was to increase graduation rates, the report said. “Colleges would readily accept state funding based on ‘seats in the classroom,’ but faced no consequences if students failed or withdrew from the class or dropped out completely.” … while research is mixed, performance funding generally has not improved graduation rates… performance funding can also have unintended consequences.

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