Posts Tagged ‘mental Health’

« Older Entries |

Ontario’s mental-health crisis, Part 3: Solving the problem will mean more beds — and more political will

Friday, December 13th, 2019

… on any given day, there are approximately 2,300 patients who are awaiting transfer to a more appropriate bed… Of these 2,300 patients, 9 per cent, or approximately 200 people, are awaiting transfer to a more appropriate care setting for a mental-health issue… The provincial government has pledged to do more for mental health and to expand the long-term-care system generally. But that will take years and sustained political will.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Ontario’s mental-health crisis, Part 2: The good, the bad, and the ugly of OHIP-covered care

Thursday, December 12th, 2019

Roughly 2 million Ontarians seek mental-health care each year… And the system is massively skewed by geographical constraints. A study in 2009, for example, found that, while there were 63 psychiatrists per 100,000 residents in the Toronto region, some remote parts of the province had barely four per 100,000 — a whopping fifteenfold difference… And timeliness matters.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Equality Debates | No Comments »


A tricky operation: Finding a place for private health insurance in a public system

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2019

Every health insurance program in the developed world, public and private, is struggling with a daunting triple challenge: An aging population, the soaring cost of new technologies and rising consumer expectations… private sector efficiency is a myth. Private hospitals keep patients longer, order more tests, prescribe more drugs and provide a lot of low-value or no-value care. They overtreat and overcharge… private hospitals are not going to solve the woes of Canadian medicare

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context | 1 Comment »


Violence against Ontario elementary teachers shouldn’t be a contract issue — it’s too important

Sunday, December 1st, 2019

Over the last decade, it has become the norm to integrate students with complex special needs into regular classrooms. Some boards still offer small, separate classes with more individual help, but that’s not what most parents demand… Students who can’t manage in a regular classroom even with a full-time educational assistant should be given a different type of help…

Tags: , ,
Posted in Education Delivery System | No Comments »


New Study Shows Canada Child Benefit Provides Additional Benefit for Food Security

Friday, November 22nd, 2019

CCB has supported a 1/3 reduction in severe food insecurity for low-income families; Modest changes to income can impact food security; If Individuals with low-income receive more money, they spend it on basic necessities like food; Income transfers help people meet their basic needs… If we address food insecurity for children and families, we will give individuals a path out of poverty and reduce costs in other areas.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


How academics can improve their quality of life

Friday, November 22nd, 2019

In this ever-widening climate of financial scarcity and job insecurity, it’s no wonder that early and mid-career researchers are working themselves to the bone just to have a fighting chance of staying in the game. Many scholars are giving up and walking away entirely – and that should worry us. Impoverishing research and education damages our societies and weakens our democracies.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Education Delivery System | No Comments »


Rape crisis centres call on attorney general to reverse cuts

Wednesday, November 20th, 2019

… the province phased out the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board, which helped assault victims access services including psychotherapy… Under this program, brought in Oct. 1, an applicant must have visited a “victim service agency” within six months of the crime against them, or within six months of disclosing that crime to authorities.  The new system, called the Victim Quick Response Program + (VQRP+), isn’t available to victims of historical crimes.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


OPP have saved more than 100 lives with naloxone

Monday, November 18th, 2019

The OPP say calls regarding overdoses rose 121 per cent between 2016 and 2018. Further, OPP data collected between September 2017 to November 2019 shows: The majority (66 per cent) of naloxone recipients were male and 34 per cent were female; The average age of naloxone recipients was 31.5 for females and 32 for males; Most incidences occurred inside a residence

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Health Delivery System | No Comments »


Video visits with doctors are a smart idea

Friday, November 15th, 2019

There are three much bigger issues the government needs to tackle to reduce the average wait time to be admitted to hospital from an emergency department. It now tops a sickening 16 hours. Those are a lack of nursing home and long-term health care beds and a shortage of home-care services. And they won’t be solved by the $3 million the province plans to spend on video visits and other digital innovations.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Health Delivery System | No Comments »


Some harsh lessons on the failings of eldercare from Down Under

Wednesday, November 13th, 2019

The 272-page Australian report, in striking contrast, uses blunt language to reflect the frustrations and fears of patients and family members. It also demands immediate action, including an injection of funding for long-term home care services as a way to keep people out of institutional care.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Delivery System | No Comments »


« Older Entries |