Posts Tagged ‘Seniors’

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On a mission to save seniors from nursing home horrors

Friday, June 17th, 2022

… there “is no magic bullet” or “a one-size-fits-all solution,” she sees the potential benefits of PSW-owned co-ops. “This is one among multiple solutions we’ll be able to put in place,” she says. “I’m a fan of aging in place, providing options for seniors to avoid going into long-term care, but let’s not forget that it is still required. At some point, people will need long-term care facilities. But we need to provide other options to delay the time where they have to go into an LTC.”

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Ontario election gives voters the chance to choose people over profits in long-term care

Friday, May 27th, 2022

If… government replicates past decisions, more than 65,000 Ontarians a year will live in a for-profit facility — many run by corporations focused on their real estate investments — in the next decade. If we follow a different path, these subsidies could fund operators that are primarily care organizations and where real estate holdings support the care, not the other way around.

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Canada Underinvests In Community Care

Tuesday, May 24th, 2022

Canada’s per capita spending on homecare and other outpatient and day program services falls below the international average. In general, countries that direct higher proportions of health spending to seniors care than Canada also spend more per capita on home care, outpatient care and day programs for seniors.

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Antiquated thinking about old age hinders Canada’s economic and social development

Tuesday, May 24th, 2022

A revised conception of old age would significantly decrease the number of people classified as old and would more accurately reflect the total number of people in Canada’s working age population. A modern definition would also mitigate stereotypes of older workers and ageism while prodding governments to reform outdated laws and provide a boost to an economy often facing worker shortages. 

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What COVID-19 has taught us about caring for our elders

Wednesday, January 5th, 2022

A recent survey by the National Institute on Aging found that almost 100 per cent of Canadians aged 65 and older planned to live in their own home for as long as possible. Yet Canada spends 87 per cent of long-term care dollars on institutionalizing people in nursing homes rather than at-home assistance.

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Labour shortage? The answer is to bring older adults back into the workforce

Monday, November 15th, 2021

Bringing older adults back into the workforce is one answer to the current talent shortage. Extended working lives create benefits for everyone. Individuals experience improved physical and mental well-being. Employers profit from loyal, engaged employees who bring guidance, expertise and balance. The economy enjoys increased spending, income tax and charitable contributions.

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Canadians want home care, not long-term care facilities, after COVID-19

Monday, November 15th, 2021

… home care is expensive, even when governmental subsidies exist — it has a much heftier price tag than public nursing home care. And for those who don’t have family members who can provide informal care, public long-term care homes are often their only choice… Governments must make home care a viable option for their aging citizens by making it more affordable via a variety of means, including subsidies and tax exemptions.

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The Care Economy Data Room: Eldercare

Friday, November 12th, 2021

Canada spends roughly 1.2% of GDP on eldercare. The OECD average is 1.7% of GDP… Nine out of ten older Canadians live at home. While care needs increase with age, even among those aged 85 and older, only 32 per cent live in residential care… There are currently 38,500 people in Ontario on waiting lists for long term care, with waits as long as 5 years… 3 million Canadians rely on unpaid, informal care – 39% rely exclusively on informal care – most of which is provided by women.

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Labour shortage? The answer is to bring older adults back into the workforce

Tuesday, November 9th, 2021

Canada is due for a rethink when it comes to age. None of life’s traditional milestones hold true today… Extended working lives create benefits for everyone. Individuals experience improved physical and mental well-being. Employers profit from loyal, engaged employees who bring guidance, expertise and balance. The economy enjoys increased spending, income tax and charitable contributions.

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Reforming long-term care starts with Revera

Monday, October 11th, 2021

… the federal government owns 100 per cent of Revera, the second largest long-term-care and retirement home group in Canada… Revera as a for-profit chain has one of the worst records in Canada, with so far over 800 deaths in its LTC and retirement homes… The newly elected federal government should move on turning Revera over to the provinces as a not-for-profit public company in LTC… If the federal government wants to make Revera a real public not-for-profit, this is easily doable and the process could start tomorrow.

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