Archive for the ‘Social Security Debates’ Category

« Older Entries |

Basic income project improved lives, but ‘now it’s back to the food bank’

Monday, March 4th, 2019

Participants reported less stress and depression, fewer health problems and a greater ability to work, buy healthy food, upgrade their education and secure stable housing… Participants receive their last payment at the end of March — barely 18 months after most began receiving the extra money — and before the government was able to do any followup studies. The project’s goal was to determine whether regular, unconditional payments improve housing, health, education, employment and social outcomes for people living on social assistance or low-wage jobs in an efficient and non-stigmatizing way.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Maybe now we can finally say it out loud — poverty is in decline

Wednesday, February 27th, 2019

… poverty tends to fall, and incomes to rise, in periods of economic growth… If the overall rate has dropped appreciably, it has fallen even more among children — especially welcome, given the lasting effects poverty can have on life chances. At nine per cent, it is down a third from just two years ago… That’s almost certainly due, at least in part, to the Liberals’ first and most significant policy reform: the rationalization of several existing child benefits and credits into a single income-tested Canada Child Benefit, with increased amounts going to low-income families.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Ontario welfare changes far from being reforms

Sunday, January 27th, 2019

The government wants recipients of Ontario Works and ODSP to work. Curiously, it proposes substantially better financial incentives for people who are certified as disabled. On Ontario Works, the plan is to exempt the first $300 a month of earned income before any clawback, compared to the current $200. Beyond the basic exemption, the current clawback is 50 per cent. The proposal is to make it 75 per cent. That is an incentive to work?

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Ford fails to connect dots between the personal and the political

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2019

A million dollars of provincial funding that makes after-school activities possible in Toronto’s disadvantaged neighbourhoods has been cut… His government also cut a $3-million program to help young people with a developmental disability transition to adulthood… It’s a false economy… Doug Ford… can’t make the leap from wanting to help on a personal level to seeing the necessary role of government in assisting groups of people dealing with social problems.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


‘Humans are suffering’: Axing of basic income pilot project leaves trail of broken dreams

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2019

The Star and other media organizations have documented how participants have been able to eat healthier food, buy warm clothing, move into stable housing and enrol in college… In addition to the court challenge, mayors of the pilot communities, international researchers, the Hamilton and Thunder Bay Chambers of Commerce, 900 medical professionals and the CEOs of 120 Canadian companies have called on both Queen’s Park and Ottawa to continue the research project the remaining two years.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Meet the Economist Advising BC on Whether to Go Ahead with a Basic Income

Monday, January 21st, 2019

Throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s, much of the growth in income inequality in Canada was tempered with taxes on higher-income people and generous social programs… “Somewhere around the mid-1990s, the bargain broke down,” Green said. Governments at all levels rolled back social spending and made tax cuts, allowing inequality to grow unchecked… “In a society this rich we should not have people living on the street.”

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Dealing with deadly donation bins only scratches poverty’s surface

Monday, January 14th, 2019

An estimated 30,000 Canadians remain homeless on any given night. The federal government’s ambitious 10-year, $40-billion Reaching Home strategy – a plan to cut chronic homelessness in half while building 100,000 units and repairing 300,000 more – won’t be launched until late spring. And we’re yet to learn how provinces, cities and community organizations will partner in its wake to produce meaningful change.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Re-instating basic income in Ontario would help raise children out of poverty

Friday, January 4th, 2019

Premier Doug Ford and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau need to reinstate the basic income pilot. It’s inconsequential whether the provincial or federal government takes the initiative; quite simply it needs to be done… The cost of the Ontario basic income model would be about $30 billion a year. Costs could be recovered by eliminating Ontario Disability Support Programs (ODSP) and Ontario Works Programs (OW) and by adjusting tax incentives granted to high-income earners.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Hamilton couple with newborn prepares for wind-down of basic income

Friday, December 28th, 2018

Weiss never had the chance to go back to school before the province announced it was scrapping the project. They’re worried about losing their home without the extra income, which was up to $17,000 a year for individuals and $24,000 for couples, less 50 per cent for money earned. “Now we’re going to have to try juggling a newborn and finding the first things that come along,” Weiss said. “It’s increasingly looking like we just kind of have to give up on all the work that we were trying to put in.”

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Liberals say they are looking at ways to provide guaranteed minimum income to all Canadians

Friday, December 21st, 2018

A guaranteed minimum income means different things to different people, but at its core is a no-strings-attached payment governments provide instead of an assortment of targeted benefits. What it costs in additional spending, the thinking goes, it makes up in reduced bureaucracy for both the government and recipients… Federal officials have considered the idea as one of a wide range of possibilities to reshape social-safety-net programs for a modern labour market marked by automation, more short-term “gig economy” jobs and a need for people to retrain several times in their working lives.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


« Older Entries |