Archive for the ‘Inclusion Debates’ Category

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It’s time to unify the disability movement

Wednesday, August 5th, 2020

A decision to issue one-time, $600 federal payments to Canadians with disabilities, in order to cover the extraordinary expenses they have incurred because of COVID-19, has finally received royal assent. But it’s too little, too late, and reaches too few… To move forward on disability rights in Canada, we must first unify the disability movement.

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Universal basic income is a means of liberation and dignity for all

Friday, July 3rd, 2020

It would be wrong to cast this universal basic income as an act of charity. Or worse, if it were seen as a vehicle to encourage indolence. Rather, a GIS should be an act of dignity. Citizens would earn the basic income by working two to three days a week in a community service of their choice. In doing so, we would pursue an economy that serves the people by advancing the common good.

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Let’s have dignity in life as well as death

Saturday, April 18th, 2020

Working together we can push governments and businesses to build a more inclusive economy that offers full-time jobs with decent wages and benefits. We can repair the frayed social safety net. This crisis has already demonstrated that governments — provincial and federal — can quickly alter policies and programs to better suit the needs of Canadians when they are highly motivated to do so.

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COVID-19 has shown Canada that it’s possible to be more inclusive

Thursday, April 16th, 2020

With remote work, online classes and virtual conferences becoming the new normal, we see employers, educational institutions and communities quickly adapting to accommodate an unexpected situation. The measures we might have once dismissed as too costly or cumbersome to accommodate for a person with a disability, an immune-compromised individual or someone with anxiety are now simply the way we all do business. In this new normal, we see what’s entirely possible, and that this flexibility benefits everyone.

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The forgotten sector in the COVID-19 fight

Friday, April 3rd, 2020

Across Ontario, there are more than 100 Community Living organizations serving 12,000 people with intellectual disabilities… Unlike workers in hospitals and health clinics, though, Community Living staff are not considered health-care workers. That means they have to scramble for protective gloves, masks and extra help for their clients.

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The Moral Imperative for Policy Advocacy

Tuesday, March 31st, 2020

… if charities do not make governments uncomfortable, they are not delivering on their charitable mission…. charitable status conveys a moral responsibility to be an active agent within civil society, that charities must be more than the sum of their government contracts and charitable receipts. At a fundamental level, charitable status implies not only the power to row but also the obligation to steer, to be thought leaders in the arena of ideas.

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Giving Ontario Communities a Greater Voice in Government Decision Making

Thursday, December 12th, 2019

Included in Mr. Jivani’s mandate is increasing community safety by combating issues such as guns and gangs, human trafficking and racism, and making real and tangible progress to improve outcomes in areas such as: education, community services, income support, and access to housing. This work will help to inform the design or redesign of programs and services and identify actions the government can take to improve people’s lives.

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Why the Western emphasis on individuals is the ultimate in intersectionality

Tuesday, November 26th, 2019

The fact of the endless multiplication of categories of victimization, let’s say (or at least difference) was actually solved long ago by the Western emphasis on the individual… meritocratic selection, where the only difference that was to be considered was the suitability of the person for the specific and well-designed tasks that constituted a given job… works — not perfectly, but less imperfectly than anything else that has been contemplated

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Marginalized people need social connections, too

Tuesday, November 12th, 2019

… we almost never talk about the lack of opportunities for something pro-social and meaningful for the homeless and marginalized to do… Funding for programming, for actual engagement with others — especially those who are not easy to engage with — is the last to be offered and first to be cut.

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Charities Now Welcome in The Political Arena: What This Means for the Charitable Sector of Today and Tomorrow

Tuesday, October 29th, 2019

… education is very important, as is stepping into the political space that has opened for charities. In other words, this reform, rather than ending the debate, has merely turned the page on a new chapter. In it, we are collectively called upon to rethink and redefine the role of “political charities” in our society. Further legislation on the subject is likely to come.

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