Archive for the ‘Inclusion Debates’ Category

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Supporting dementia patients and caregivers is a moral imperative

Tuesday, September 13th, 2022

On average, caregivers provided 26 care hours a week… The toll this takes on caregivers is profound… 45 per cent of caregivers exhibit symptoms of distress. And 21 per cent say they’re unable to continue their care duties due to stress.  And we have only seen the tip of the iceberg… all levels of government must help to make delaying dementia a reality.

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How a Massive Expansion of Public Housing Can Pay for Itself

Tuesday, May 31st, 2022

… public or non-profit housing could be built and run at break-even rents about a third lower than those of private rental housing… the provincial government could invest in creating new rental homes at a scale that would fundamentally transform our broken housing system. But there’s no reason in principle that this type of self-financed public housing couldn’t be built by any willing level of government. The federal government could certainly do it and so could large municipalities

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It’s election time and Ontario still chooses not to eliminate poverty

Tuesday, May 10th, 2022

During the campaign, Ontarians will hear a lot of about affordability, except those conversations will not focus on those who can afford the least… no matter who wins this election, people who need social assistance will find themselves in the same place they were in before the election, and the election before that. They will still be in deep, deep poverty. 

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We can’t simply build our way out of our housing crisis

Friday, April 29th, 2022

More new housing will help if it’s the kind of housing that is currently lacking, built for the people who need it most. Various studies indicate that 40 to 50 per cent of people in Canada are living paycheque-to-paycheque. That is, nearly half the population of this prosperous country are income insecure. Plans for new housing must prioritize these people.

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Convoy protesters talked a lot about freedom. But here’s the real threat to Canadians being free

Tuesday, April 12th, 2022

On the left we need to hear people’s concerns on freedom of speech and individual autonomy. And on the right, there must be openness to talk about how true freedom is contingent on everyone having the basics needed to make a real go at life.  We can wave our flags and fight for our causes but let’s also step up to the moment and have real dialogue about what freedom truly means.

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How did Ontario’s disgraceful disability support program get so bad? 

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2022

The vast majority of Ontarians with a disability are not on the program. Of those who are, 57 per cent have either mental illnesses or developmental disabilities. Nevertheless, the PCs’ new “vision” for the disabled continues to push the optimistic goal of finding jobs for them… Instead, they are ignored by a provincial government that can afford to give wealthy people a break on their power rates, vacationers a tax break for renting a cottage, maybe even make licence plates free, a cheap political stunt that would cost $1 billion a year.

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Ontario’s ‘affordable housing’ task force report does not address the real problems

Friday, February 11th, 2022

… the report reads like a blueprint for how to build more market-rate housing. Unfortunately, there is little empirical evidence to indicate that on its own, market-driven upzoning, laneway housing or mixed-use zoning produces the kind of housing that is accessible to households on low and moderate incomes… We talk a lot about housing today… because it has now become a middle-class problem.

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Let’s not conflate advocacy and political activities

Wednesday, December 1st, 2021

We are not advocating for policies for our own bottom line. Rather, we are advocating for the public benefit… Non-profit sector advocacy builds awareness and provides vital information to governments about our work… Applying the word “lobbying” to a sector that puts the “public” in public policy is simply wrong. Civil society – another term for the non-profit sector – upholds democracy.

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Decolonising is about adding, not cancelling, knowledge

Monday, September 13th, 2021

UniversityWorldNews.com – story 11 September 2021.   Ali Meghji The past few months in Britain have seen a growing ridiculing of calls to decolonise the curriculum. However, these criticisms have failed to understand what decolonising the curriculum is about. From the prime minister claiming that Britain needed to move on from the “cringing embarrassment” it […]

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Releasing residential school records is a crucial step toward documenting Canada’s genocidal legacy — but the effort will face considerable challenges

Sunday, July 4th, 2021

Huronia housed children and youth with intellectual disability diagnoses, whose parents were pressured to give up custody. Like residential schools, Huronia was a site of poor living conditions and brutal mistreatment. Like Kamloops, St. Eugene’s and Marieval, Huronia’s on-site cemetery houses many unmarked graves. We have worked with institutional survivors to document Huronia’s legacy. Here are some lessons we learned along the way.

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