Archive for the ‘Governance Debates’ Category

« Older Entries | Newer Entries »

Countering political disinformation campaigns requires transparency

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

… if the purpose is to catch foreign efforts to sway the campaign with disinformation and divisive message, the definition of political ads is too narrow. Those Russian-paid ads didn’t always mention a candidate or a party. A real effort to try to counter disinformation campaigns would require some broadly open-source transparency for a larger class of paid messages. The big social-media companies seem to believe that clashes with their business model.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Canada must set a higher bar on data protection in an era of ‘surveillance capitalism’

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

Companies should protect the data they manage, not exploit it. Every individual should own their own data. It should be yours, and yours only. Data protection and security should be paramount. Privacy should be embedded by design in the development of products and services… Now is the time for a robust discussion between policy-makers and the tech sector about how much regulatory oversight is needed, both to protect privacy and to spur innovation and competition.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Freedom and democracy cannot exist without privacy

Monday, January 28th, 2019

In December, AI ethics researchers released the Montreal Declaration for the Responsible Development of Artificial Intelligence — a set of 10 principles for developers and organizations that implement AI, as well as the individuals subject to it… public authorities now need to act. Governments and legislators in particular have an important role to play in drawing on ethical principles to create an enforceable legal framework for AI that formally requires relevant actors to act fairly and responsibly.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Why democracy is in trouble, and what Canadians can do about it

Wednesday, January 16th, 2019

The less attention communities pay to how they are governed, the easier it is to intrude on the rule of law, the rights of minorities, or threaten the values that we do share… So what can Canadians do to shift these trends? It starts with recognizing democracy is about more than elections… “democracy is a verb”… it can be cultivated, grown and improved upon… start conversations, build networks, invest in skills development, mobilize communities and get people to take notice.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Ford flirts with private health care at his peril

Monday, January 14th, 2019

Ford’s election pledges to axe cap-and-trade and implement tax giveaways that overwhelmingly benefit high income earners and corporations will cost approximately $22 billion. That’s $22 billion less for health, education, roads, transit, housing, parks and so on: among the most severe cuts in our history. We anticipate these cuts to start in earnest after the federal election. They will almost certainly result in privatization, if we do not stop them.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Big Tech’s net loss: How governments can turn anger into action

Saturday, December 29th, 2018

Democratic governments will need to wrestle with how their speech laws apply to the digital world. This is going to require bringing together the private sector and civil society in a hard discussion about the nature and limits of free speech, about who is censored online and how, about responsibilities for moderating speech at scale, and about universal versus national speech norms… the sheer breadth of the economic and social services now provided by platforms might demand a more nuanced approach to how they are governed.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Do you want a carbon tax, or do you want to be lied to?

Thursday, December 27th, 2018

… effective regulations to bring down emissions are not free. They cost people serious money, whether as taxpayers, ratepayers or consumers… One emerging conservative alternative to carbon pricing is working with business to spur the development of green technology. What that usually means is taxpayers giving subsidies to business… With emissions, you can have expensive and effective, or cheap and toothless… At least carbon taxes are transparently expensive.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Premier Doug Ford and the politics of spite

Sunday, November 18th, 2018

… his most attractive quality for many very vocal supporters is not what he will do for them, but what he will do to the people they hate. That’s why his political rhetoric is so laser-focused on “downtown elites” and other imagined enemies: who he is standing up for is less important than who he is taking down… If suspicions of petty vindictiveness as a guiding principle of government could be waved away in the early going, this week has made it all the more obvious that it is true.

Tags: ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


The culture war has been won, so now we fight about words

Sunday, November 11th, 2018

The long-running fight over language – in which the words and phrases of the ideologically earnest are rejected as “politically correct” – is being mistaken for some larger and more irreconcilable battle over underlying ideas and beliefs. Those who are truly intolerant and opposed to pluralism – those who think social justice is not just an awkward phrase but a bad idea – are a small and declining group. But that group is manipulating language conflicts to their political advantage.

Tags: ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Ontario city rushes in where first-past-the-post adherents fear to tread [Ranked Ballots]

Friday, October 19th, 2018

London, Ont., will be the first Canadian city in recent history to elect representatives using ranked ballots, in which voters mark their top three choices rather than just one, allowing an instant runoff in which losing candidates are eliminated and votes redistributed until someone has a majority. And once it’s over, the spin battle will begin – about whether that system deserves to be adopted elsewhere, or whether it’s enough of a bust that it shouldn’t even be used again here.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


« Older Entries | Newer Entries »