Archive for the ‘Child & Family Policy Context’ Category

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The cost of inaction for youth ‘aging out’ of Ontario foster care is estimated at $2 billion

Tuesday, January 4th, 2022

One key recommendation is to rethink the norm of independence at 18. From interviews with youth, all describe profound isolation, loneliness and few caring relationships underpinning the challenges they face. We must shift to a model of interdependence — fostering non-professional caring relationships for youth under state guardianship that extend long after 18.

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Federal Liberals slash criminal pardon application fee to $50 as of new year

Tuesday, December 21st, 2021

The Fresh Start coalition, comprising over 60 groups, said the reforms would help people with records reintegrate into society, promote workforce participation and improve community safety… the minister’s office said that by reducing the fee and shortening the wait periods to apply for a record suspension, “we will significantly reduce barriers to reintegration and rehabilitation.”

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Canada Underinvests In Community Care

Friday, December 17th, 2021

Canada’s per capita spending on homecare and other outpatient and day program services falls below the international average. In general, countries that direct higher proportions of health spending to seniors care than Canada also spend more per capita on home care, outpatient care and day programs for seniors.

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New Brunswick gets a $10-a-day daycare deal, leaving Ontario as the lone holdout

Friday, December 10th, 2021

… licensed child care in Ontario remains “startlingly unaffordable” for many families, despite the existence of parental fee subsidies and a refundable tax credit…. economists… recommend… that special care be taken even after a deal is reached to ensure lower-income families are not at a disadvantage when it comes to getting the benefits of the new program… policymakers will need some kind of sliding scale… [and] dramatic expansion of non-profit child care

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The Care Economy Data Room: Eldercare

Friday, November 12th, 2021

Canada spends roughly 1.2% of GDP on eldercare. The OECD average is 1.7% of GDP… Nine out of ten older Canadians live at home. While care needs increase with age, even among those aged 85 and older, only 32 per cent live in residential care… There are currently 38,500 people in Ontario on waiting lists for long term care, with waits as long as 5 years… 3 million Canadians rely on unpaid, informal care – 39% rely exclusively on informal care – most of which is provided by women.

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The Care Economy Data Room: Early Learning & Childcare

Saturday, November 6th, 2021

… facts that will shape the future of early learning and childcare… Canada was dead last among 14 peer nations’ public spending on early learning and childcare in 2006, at 0.25% of GDP… Half the workers in the sector were paid less than $19.20 per hour.

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Reforming long-term care starts with Revera

Monday, October 11th, 2021

… the federal government owns 100 per cent of Revera, the second largest long-term-care and retirement home group in Canada… Revera as a for-profit chain has one of the worst records in Canada, with so far over 800 deaths in its LTC and retirement homes… The newly elected federal government should move on turning Revera over to the provinces as a not-for-profit public company in LTC… If the federal government wants to make Revera a real public not-for-profit, this is easily doable and the process could start tomorrow.

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Affordable child care will help women re-enter workforce, stimulating the economy

Monday, September 13th, 2021

By subsidizing child care to women who intend to return to work, the government provides adequate social support to those who need the help the most. Such a policy will eventually help the economy to grow naturally, and will embolden consumers’ confidence to increase spending. As women return to the workforce, their increased income yields greater spending power, boosting demand for normal goods and further stimulating the economy.

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Payments To Parents For Childcare Can Spur Supply Of New Spaces

Wednesday, September 8th, 2021

… non-subsidized spaces can be created quickly in response to an increase in demand (driven by generous childcare-related payments to parents). The Quebec experience shows that subsidized licensed care can coexist with a refundable tax credit system for non-subsidized care, and that increasing the supply of childcare can also originate from direct payments to parents.

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Canadian election 2021: Will the national child-care plan survive?

Tuesday, August 24th, 2021

In the event of a Liberal loss, a new government in Ottawa may not prioritize signing Liberal deals.  Regardless, any child-care relief will be delayed and recovery in the country’s biggest economic centres will stall. Families will watch their provincial neighbours enjoy the benefits of more affordable child care knowing they were used as political pawns. It’s a strategy with serious potential to backfire in the months and years to come as those three Conservative premiers face their own electorates. The holdouts could find themselves booted out of office.

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