Archive for the ‘Child & Family Policy Context’ Category

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With a looming aging crisis, who is helping the caregivers?

Sunday, April 14th, 2019

“The cost and consequences of caring for an aging family member are high, and higher for women than they are for men, and higher still if there are no workplace, community or family supports to assist them”… the problem with women’s eldercare is that it is ultimately a problem of unpaid work that persists throughout women’s lives, from child care to household chores to emotional labour to end-of-life care… “We will all be caregivers and care receivers at some point in time. We need to figure out how to do this well.”

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New parental-leave benefit inches us ever closer toward gender equality

Monday, April 1st, 2019

… women who take a longer maternity leave are seen as less committed to their jobs by co-workers and managers. This is a foundational fact in the chronic underrepresentation of women in upper management. Reducing mothers’ time away from work by shifting more child-care responsibilities on to fathers could play a major role in correcting this problem.

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After the latest court ruling, solitary confinement’s days are numbered

Monday, April 1st, 2019

Finally, a Canadian court has reached a conclusion that long seemed inevitable: putting a prison inmate in solitary confinement for more than 15 days constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, in violation of Section 12 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. Not only did the Ontario Court of Appeal make this landmark ruling last week, it also gave Correctional Service Canada an April 13 deadline to bring the new limit into effect.

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Changes to Ontario’s (still) flawed autism program show Ford government can be pushed back

Sunday, March 24th, 2019

… these announced “enhancements,”… don’t truly fix this flawed program. This still amounts to a $331-million plan that does not meet the needs, especially for those on the high-needs end of the spectrum and girls who are who are often diagnosed later than boys so doubly suffer under the government’s age discrimination, which provides far less funding for kids over the age of six. But the changes are a sign that the Ford government is movable and open, albeit belatedly, to listening to experts.

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New Zealand’s gun ban shows the way. Will Canada be as bold?

Saturday, March 23rd, 2019

Will Canada be as brave as New Zealand, and ban the types of guns that facilitate mass killing of humans? It would take an enormous act of political will. It would take a critical mass of people of to advocate against the weapons. It would involve standing up to the country’s vocal gun lobby… before the next tragedy has people sending their thoughts and prayers. It can be done. New Zealand has shown the way.

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Parents rally against Ford government’s autism changes

Friday, March 8th, 2019

the government is boosting spending to clear a wait list of 23,000 children and giving families limited budgets to choose the services they want. Depending on their income, parents will be eligible for up to $20,000 a year for children under 6, with a lifetime maximum of $140,000. Children older than that can access up to $5,000 a year up to age 18, to a lifetime maximum of $55,000. Critics have said those amounts fall far short, as children with severe needs can require up to $80,000 a year in therapy.

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Children’s agency slams Ford government’s autism funding changes

Wednesday, March 6th, 2019

Kinark is the only regional service provider — so far — to publicly oppose the changes announced by Lisa MacLeod, minister of children, community and social services last month… Under the overhaul, provincial funding will no longer be administered by nine regional service providers and instead flow directly to families who will use the money to buy therapy from private therapists or publicly funded agencies… A new independent agency to be established in the next year will administer “childhood budgets” to families based on household income and a child’s age.

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End solitary confinement, says Ontario human rights commissioner in wake of Adam Capay case

Wednesday, February 27th, 2019

Solitary confinement continues to be overused in Ontario correctional facilities and should be phased out entirely, says one of the central figures responsible for drawing attention to the plight of Adam Capay, the 26-year-old Indigenous man who spent more than four years in isolation… [The (OHRC) Commissioner found]… details emerging from the Capay case “extremely troubling” and urging the government to end the practice of isolating prisoners for 22 or more hours a day.

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Ontario autism program changes ‘best for all children,’ says social services minister

Wednesday, February 20th, 2019

… the government has promised to clear the wait lists for diagnosis and therapy, and will introduce a childhood budget allowing families to choose the services they want. Families will be eligible for up to $20,000 a year for children under 6 — up to a lifetime maximum of $140,000. Children older than that can access up to $5,000 a year up to age 18, to a lifetime maximum of $55,000. However, only families earning less than $55,000 in net income will qualify for the full funding amounts.

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The Ford government should invest properly in child care

Monday, February 11th, 2019

The Ford government could invest wisely in child care, as so many other provinces do. It’s not only the right thing to do for families; it’s the right thing for businesses and the economy as well. Study after study shows that affordable, accessible, quality child care does the most to help women get back into the workforce, boost family incomes, improve early childhood skills for poor kids, add to government tax coffers, reduce child poverty, and shrink the wage gap.

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