Archive for the ‘Child & Family Policy Context’ Category

« Older Entries | Newer Entries »

Canada set to ban assault-style weapons, including AR-15 and the gun used in Polytechnique massacre

Thursday, April 30th, 2020

Ottawa is set to ban a number of assault-style firearms and weapons involved in mass shootings in Canada and abroad, including the Ruger Mini-14 that was used during the 1989 École Polytechnique massacre, federal officials say… The banning of firearms can be done by a decision of cabinet called an order-in-council and does not require the adoption of new legislation. There is no exact definition of a military-style firearm, which means the government’s decision is based on science as well as political choices.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


Close your eyes and imagine what a best-in-class LTC system looks like… then build it

Saturday, April 25th, 2020

It has fewer and larger LTC facilities. We have too many now… a proper ratio of personal support workers (PSWs) to residents, as with regulated daycare centres… Each resident of the new LTC system has his or her own room, with a personal washroom… PSWs are prohibited from working in multiple locations. That widespread practice, rooted in PSWs’ low pay, is believed to have caused much of the COVID-19 spread.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


Canada’s senior-care crisis has been long in the works

Thursday, April 16th, 2020

As a country, we need to rethink how we approach long-term care from top to bottom. And we don’t have a lot of time to do it. A 2017 Conference Board study estimated that, to meet demand, Canada needs to nearly double the number of long-term care beds available to about 450,000 by 2035. We can’t afford to do it on the cheap.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


Doug Ford didn’t protect long-term-care facilities from COVID-19. Neither did the rest of us

Thursday, April 16th, 2020

We could and should hold the current government to account — for falling behind the rest of Canada on testing, for lagging on nursing-home care, for fobbing off responsibility on to public health officials. But there is enough blame to go around — for politicians past and present, public servants and the public… Our premier has put his best face forward in recent weeks, but he still has much to answer for.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


Ontarians need a bolder new approach to home care

Wednesday, February 19th, 2020

… here are four simple yet transformative ways to make it work better for patients, families, and those providing care: Return nurses to home care… Allow direct referrals… Focus on patient needs, not patient time… Create a “long-term care at home” option… It means changing the way our organizations are paid… and holding providers accountable for costs as well as results for those receiving care.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | 1 Comment »


Governments have been under investing in youth for decades

Wednesday, February 19th, 2020

Since 1976… Had public investments in younger Canadians kept pace with investments in retirees, governments would invest over $19 billion more per year on younger residents. That’s enough to pay for a national child-care program twice; or increase post-secondary spending by 50 per cent; or rapidly accelerate the national housing strategy in response to the growing gap between rents, home prices and young people’s earnings.

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | 1 Comment »


Cuts to legal aid continue to harm vulnerable families and youth

Tuesday, February 11th, 2020

Last spring’s devastating cuts to legal aid impacted a wide swathe of programming, including efforts to support families challenging school suspensions and expulsions far too often meted out to racialized youth. The repercussions continue to reverberate… fewer people are eligible for support… That makes it harder for vulnerable families to find help addressing poor housing conditions, unjust treatment at work or school, or other legal issues.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


On gangs and guns, politicians are missing the point

Sunday, February 9th, 2020

History has taught us that this is not just a policing issue, or just a gun issue, or just a crime issue. It’s all of these, and a lot more. It’s not something that can be fixed by spending more money on a narrow set of priorities, or by talking tough at a news conference… They need long-term, considered help, not grandiose political posturing

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


Why does the Indigenous rate of incarceration only grow?

Friday, January 24th, 2020

Conservative policies stripped sentencing judges and parole boards of discretion, adding mandatory minimums and other limits on their ability to consider specific facts and risks of individual cases. While the Liberals opposed many of these reforms during campaign season, they have done little to address the harmful legacy… we have not learned enough from community-based and Indigenous legal traditions that offer more promising methods of responding to wrongdoing.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


Minister says change won’t come ‘overnight’ as Indigenous child-welfare law takes effect

Friday, January 3rd, 2020

“Each community has different capacities and preparedness… Until Indigenous communities pass their own child-services laws, Miller said, services currently provided to Indigenous children will continue as before… Some Indigenous communities have expressed concerns that no stable funding to help them take over child-welfare services

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


« Older Entries | Newer Entries »