Archive for the ‘Inclusion’ Category

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Next Steps for Non-Profits in Canada’s Evidence Ecosystem

Tuesday, March 5th, 2019

If a non-profit is interested in improving its use of evidence-based practices, one of the easiest and most cost-effective approaches is to dedicate staff resources (or hire an external researcher or partner with an academic institution) to consolidate existing evidence… lack of evidence capacity among frontline practitioners and policymakers remains a significant barrier for the adoption of evidence… service users have an important role in guiding evidence-based program design and policymaking.

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Toronto council falling behind on election pledges to reduce poverty, report finds

Tuesday, February 26th, 2019

“Rather than fully funding council-approved strategies and plans, the budget reveals the real priorities of Council — low property taxes that especially benefit the affluent, no new revenue tools (i.e. taxes from other sources), and expensive capital projects that don’t deliver on the critical needs of Toronto residents… The current budget is designed to serve the most affluent Torontonians at the expense of everyone else, especially the poorest residents of our city.”

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New study finds the developmentally disabled are vulnerable in Ontario

Thursday, February 21st, 2019

The research from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences found the developmentally disabled were significantly more likely to die young, languish in hospital without plans for appropriate aftercare, spend time in long-term care, or have repeat hospitalizations and emergency room visits than their non-disabled peers… the findings held true regardless of what disability was specifically at play. They also transcended a variety of boundaries that usually serve as strong predictors of poor health outcomes, such as age and socioeconomic status.

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Toronto may finally have found a better way to build affordable housing

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2019

The city’s “housing now” report outlines zoning the sites for more than 10,000 units of housing and requiring that at least two-thirds of them be purpose-built rentals. And at least half of those rentals (about 3,700) must meet a measure of affordability… Homeless shelters are bursting at the seams, the wait-list for social housing runs tens of thousands deep, and there are still more renters struggling to keep up with rents that rise faster than incomes…
But it does start to tackle part of the problem

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Provincial cuts leave adults with disabilities ‘hanging on a ledge’

Saturday, January 19th, 2019

Parents unable to manage or co-ordinate their adult son or daughter’s daily life believe the only options are day programs, which cost as much as $35,000 a year, or residential care, that typically runs at $140,000 annually, McGill says. Independent facilitators, however, work with individuals to discover their dreams, interests and goals and connect them with much less costly community resources.

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You can’t say inclusive education doesn’t work. We haven’t even begun to try

Friday, January 11th, 2019

Education is not a privilege. It is a human right. That means no child has more of a right to walk into a classroom than any other child. We all know that is not how the system currently works. Our education model was created to support “typically developing” children. When segregated classrooms were abolished, we invited children with disabilities and children who were neurodiverse into a space that was essentially designed to guarantee their failure.

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Ontario Government Is Fuelling Youth Homelessness Crisis, Say Critics

Wednesday, December 19th, 2018

The Conservative government announced the closure of the independent watchdog’s office last month. The office had a broad mandate to advocate for children, including those in government care, Indigenous children and youth, incarcerated youth and those with disabilities. Activists and advocates who work with youth saw the news as a major blow, with an increase in youth homelessness as one result… Youth homelessness is a big problem… but it’s one we can fix.

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Why not let the women and children in the Tijuana camp resettle in Canada?

Wednesday, December 12th, 2018

Canada has set out that the treatment of women and girls is a priority of our international policy. One of the key findings of the World Refugee Council Report to be released in the new year is the extent of discrimination against women in refugee situations. Here is a clear opportunity to act against such bias… Canadian leadership in meeting this tragedy on our doorstep would be a welcome, tangible demonstration of how the compacts can be a springboard for direct action and lead to improved collaboration on migration and refugees issues.

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The contradictions at the heart of Canada’s modern multiculturalism

Tuesday, December 11th, 2018

So why has the issue of immigration now become so emotional, and assumed such potency? … Part of the answer lies with high levels of inequality, part of the answer with tepid economic growth, and another part lying with a cooler-looking economic future… where jobs and wages have been lost to robotics, machine learning, artificial intelligence and automation, blue-collar workers, mainly males, have been driven toward racial resentment and ordered populist politics.

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Help the poor: Stop donating canned goods to food banks

Thursday, December 6th, 2018

If you hand your food bank a 30 pound office hamper filled with random food, you’re handing over a miniature logistical challenge that may or may not end up on the table of a hungry family. Hand over $20, and the food bank will be able to buy $100 worth of food, they’ll save on processing costs and Ottawa will kick you back up to $6.

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