Archive for the ‘Inclusion’ Category

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Ontario’s ‘affordable housing’ task force report does not address the real problems

Friday, February 11th, 2022

… the report reads like a blueprint for how to build more market-rate housing. Unfortunately, there is little empirical evidence to indicate that on its own, market-driven upzoning, laneway housing or mixed-use zoning produces the kind of housing that is accessible to households on low and moderate incomes… We talk a lot about housing today… because it has now become a middle-class problem.

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As Toronto’s homeless freeze, modular housing for them sits empty in a city parking lot. Blame Doug Ford’s government

Thursday, February 10th, 2022

The city asked for a special minister’s order to fast track modular housing for the homeless in Willowdale. The province has refused… The modular housing units sit empty near Finch Station, a five-minute drive from their intended destination… the… government’s new report on housing affordability recommends limiting exactly that: the seemingly endless community consultations that stall new housing in cities. 

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Warehousing disabled people in long-termcare homes needs to stop. Instead, nationalize home care.

Thursday, January 13th, 2022

It is clear that regardless of ownership — by private corporations or public agencies — the warehousing, caging and incarcerating of older and younger disabled people is an act of violence… We must support disabled people’s call to abolish LTC and develop a national home care, palliative care and pharmacare system that robustly funds and prioritizes disabled older and younger people’s desire to live in community.

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Canadians with disabilities fell through the cracks in the pandemic response. Here’s what needs to change as Omicron surges

Tuesday, January 11th, 2022

… living with a disability is one minority group that anyone can join.  Disability Without Poverty is led by people with disabilities and came about around the end of 2020 in response to gaps in how the government served their communities during the pandemic and to push for a national disability benefit, which has been slowly moving through Parliament and would provide support besides existing provincial programs. 

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Its critics call it ‘birth tourism.’ But is the practice real? COVID-19 is providing clues

Friday, December 17th, 2021

Griffith estimates that the percentage of “tourism births” has now reached one per cent of all births in Canada in an average year. “This is really a question of the integrity of the citizenship program… This is legal but it’s still a loophole that allows basically fairly affluent women and families to shortcut the process, find a backdoor entry and without going through the standard process of becoming a Canadian citizen.”

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CERB helped Canadians during COVID-19 — but not the most vulnerable

Friday, December 10th, 2021

CERB is an example of a liberal welfare policy that distinguishes between the deserving and undeserving. Benefits were limited to $2,000 per month and taxable. Benefits were only available to people who earned a minimum of $5,000 in the previous year and whose work was directly affected by COVID-19… Like many limited means-tested programs that emphasize work above all else, CERB left out the most vulnerable in our society.

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Let’s not conflate advocacy and political activities

Wednesday, December 1st, 2021

We are not advocating for policies for our own bottom line. Rather, we are advocating for the public benefit… Non-profit sector advocacy builds awareness and provides vital information to governments about our work… Applying the word “lobbying” to a sector that puts the “public” in public policy is simply wrong. Civil society – another term for the non-profit sector – upholds democracy.

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How to repair long-term care in Canada

Wednesday, September 15th, 2021

… the earliest victims of the pandemic were residents of LTC, our most fragile and vulnerable elders. Surely one key lesson from the pandemic is the urgent task to improve LTC so residents can live, and die, with dignity… [Charitable] foundation funding is best directed at supporting knowledge and advocacy rather than subsidizing the operation of LTC homes, a government responsibility… support for research and advocacy would be a more effective avenue for foundations to support… [or] “venture philanthropy” – specifically to demonstrate and evaluate new models of LTC care.

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Decolonising is about adding, not cancelling, knowledge

Monday, September 13th, 2021

UniversityWorldNews.com – story 11 September 2021.   Ali Meghji The past few months in Britain have seen a growing ridiculing of calls to decolonise the curriculum. However, these criticisms have failed to understand what decolonising the curriculum is about. From the prime minister claiming that Britain needed to move on from the “cringing embarrassment” it […]

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Worried about your charity? Why WE Charity’s practice is atypical

Monday, August 30th, 2021

The WE controversy… offers a number of lessons. There is some urgency to update the regulations and oversight of charities that conduct business activities, particularly those using social enterprise arms rather than doing this work within the charity… Finally, it warns charities to be cautious where their conduct may trigger conflict-of-interest legislation or bring to light their practices under lobbying legislation. Being ethical is a broader concept than being legal…

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