• Treaty of 1850 makes First Nations full economic partners

    It is believed that the rights outlined in RHT precede the Constitution Act of Canada, which treaty the Anishinabek leadership signed with the Crown nearly 170 years ago. First Nations have been living up to our part in this treaty relationship. All we ask is for our treaty partners to remember their past, renew the treaty relationship and uphold their end of the agreement. There is no doubt that as treaty partners, together, we need to once again repair and renew our relationship.

  • How We All Can Help Improve Indigenous Child Welfare Today

    … while we’re doing the hard work of implementing a new way of doing Indigenous child welfare, what could be done right now to help Indigenous families and kids in the current system? … offer Indigenous control, seek prevention, stop taking kids into care altogether… But other actions, some big and some small, don’t just need government to move forward. They need the buy-in, co-operation and good faith effort from everyone in Canada.

  • Nearly half of youth incarcerated nationwide are Indigenous: Statistics Canada

    Policy decisions, such as mandatory minimum sentences, have had a disproportionate impact on Indigenous communities… [despite] bail reform, restorative justice efforts and culturally appropriate initiatives. The justice system cannot stand alone in curbing the trend of incarcerating Indigenous youth, he suggested. Tackling poverty, unemployment or underemployment, poor housing, addictions and mental illness would make a large difference

  • Quebec shows the way to fight child poverty

    Last year a Statistics Canada study found that though Quebec has the second-lowest household income in the the country, it also has the second-lowest rate of child poverty. Why should that be? According to Statistics Canada it’s because the province has chosen to invest generously in two proven poverty busters: universal day care and the most generous provincial child benefits in the country.

  • Good Intentions, Not Enough Action in Indigenous Child Welfare Plan, Says Advocate

    … many of the prevention programs the government is now pledging to fund don’t currently exist. Additional funding will be needed for capital and start-up costs for new programming to keep kids with their families… “It’s taken us literally generations to get into the circumstances that have led to a severe overrepresentation of Indigenous children in child welfare… So it’s not going to happen overnight, but we’re seeing really positive movement…”

  • Ottawa must learn from failures on Indigenous programs

    On education, he found a significant gap in high school graduation rates between Indigenous students living on reserves and other Canadian students… On employment, Ferguson found that Employment and Social Development Canada did not collect the data it needed to assess whether programs aimed at helping Indigenous people find work were actually increasing the number of people finding sustainable jobs.

  • As universities ‘Indigenize,’ some see a threat to open inquiry

    Universities poach relatively scarce Indigenous professors from rival institutions, and some set quotas for hiring Indigenous professors and enrolling Indigenous students. They are rethinking curricula, a few schools introducing mandatory Indigenous-themed courses and others incorporating Indigenous knowledge in existing courses. And questions are getting louder about who is entitled to teach about Indigenous people.

  • MMIWG inquiry gets six-month deadline extension to finish its work

    … the extension will ensure more people can share their experiences with the inquiry, while still “underscoring the urgency” of its final report… extra money will depend on staffing and other costs that the inquiry will identify… The due date for the inquiry’s final report — meant to probe the “systemic causes” of violence against Indigenous women and girls and make recommendations to the government to address them — is now April 30, 2019.

  • Federal judge approves $875 million settlement for Indigenous ’60s scoop survivors

    The settlement includes $750 million for the survivors, $50 million for an Indigenous healing foundation and $75 million for legal fees. Last October, the federal government said the proposed settlement was for about 20,000 survivors who were moved between 1951 and 1991… [Justice Michel] Shore noted during his opening remarks that the hearing was not the place to share stories, but rather an opportunity for victims to weigh in on the proposed settlement.

  • How Canada Created a Crisis in Indigenous Child Welfare

    The outcomes for kids in the child welfare system, Indigenous or not, are not good… For Indigenous youth, the issues are worse… Every province and territory makes its own decisions on child welfare, including for reserve communities. So how did they all end up with an overwhelming number of Indigenous children in care? Like every social issue facing Indigenous people in Canada, the origins date back to colonization.