« Older Entries | Newer Entries »

Canada set to ban assault-style weapons, including AR-15 and the gun used in Polytechnique massacre

Thursday, April 30th, 2020

Ottawa is set to ban a number of assault-style firearms and weapons involved in mass shootings in Canada and abroad, including the Ruger Mini-14 that was used during the 1989 École Polytechnique massacre, federal officials say… The banning of firearms can be done by a decision of cabinet called an order-in-council and does not require the adoption of new legislation. There is no exact definition of a military-style firearm, which means the government’s decision is based on science as well as political choices.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


How is Ottawa going to pay off its COVID-19 debt? With any luck, it won’t have to

Tuesday, April 28th, 2020

… the country’s long-term fiscal game plan is likely to look like the one that financed the Second World War… In the 30 years after the war, Canada did not pay off the national debt. It even added to it… The reason was economic growth. The debt was large and growing, but the economy grew slightly faster. That’s how Canada got rid of its war debt without literally paying it off… borrowing costs, low then, are at record lows now.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Debates | No Comments »


Our civil justice system needs to be brought into the 21st century

Sunday, April 26th, 2020

We can’t keep telling the public that this increasingly incomprehensible complicated process is in their interests and for their benefit, because they’re not buying it any more… It’s time to think about designing a whole new way to deliver justice to ordinary people with ordinary disputes and ordinary bank accounts. That’s what real access to justice needs and that’s what the public is entitled to get.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Delivery System | No Comments »


The COVID-19 pandemic shines a light on our failing: We need paid, respected community health workers

Tuesday, April 21st, 2020

The virus has exposed the need for a public-health system that more strongly integrates community-level responsiveness with the needs of vulnerable populations as part of its daily practice, as well as in times of crisis… we have no excuse not to invest in the human capital and community supports that would allow core public-health activities to be fully effective year-round.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


We can see the way out of the coronavirus pandemic, but the steps to get there will be slow

Monday, April 20th, 2020

There is no easy option… We can tough it out at home, or we can tough it out at work. We can live a little less free, or a lot. We can lose thousands of lives, or tens of thousands; endure slow growth, or a depression. Those are the real choices before us. Either way, it will take months, at least, before we can declare victory.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


CERB is an unintended experiment in basic income

Monday, April 20th, 2020

… we have a historic opportunity for Ottawa, the provinces and territories to reshape cash transfers for Canadians who have low incomes, regardless of the reason why. COVID-19 could create a legacy: an income-support system that is efficient, non-stigmatizing, encourages work and is sufficient to provide better health outcomes and liquidity for people and communities. This would be a streamlined national reform vital to the economics of rebuilding and recovery.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Social Security Debates | No Comments »


Canada’s senior-care crisis has been long in the works

Thursday, April 16th, 2020

As a country, we need to rethink how we approach long-term care from top to bottom. And we don’t have a lot of time to do it. A 2017 Conference Board study estimated that, to meet demand, Canada needs to nearly double the number of long-term care beds available to about 450,000 by 2035. We can’t afford to do it on the cheap.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


COVID-19 has shown Canada that it’s possible to be more inclusive

Thursday, April 16th, 2020

With remote work, online classes and virtual conferences becoming the new normal, we see employers, educational institutions and communities quickly adapting to accommodate an unexpected situation. The measures we might have once dismissed as too costly or cumbersome to accommodate for a person with a disability, an immune-compromised individual or someone with anxiety are now simply the way we all do business. In this new normal, we see what’s entirely possible, and that this flexibility benefits everyone.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Inclusion Debates | No Comments »


Seniors’ care shouldn’t be a horror show, even when the pandemic is over

Sunday, April 12th, 2020

Both B.C. and Alberta have banned health care staff from working at multiple institutions, a common practice that allows the coronavirus to spread quickly. This should be a permanent policy, not a temporary one. There is no lack of work in nursing homes and long-term care. In fact, there are dire personnel shortages. But many employers refuse to offer full-time work so they can avoid paying benefits… who wants to put their life on the line for fifteen bucks an hour, no benefits – and no PPE?

Tags: , ,
Posted in Child & Family Debates | No Comments »


Let’s think big about what a post-pandemic Canada looks like – and let’s do it now

Friday, April 10th, 2020

How do we prepare our health-care system for the next epidemic? How do we make social welfare more comprehensive and compassionate? Do we do this by revisiting the idea of a guaranteed annual income? … Yes, it will cost money. We will incur huge deficits. But as Bob Rae and Mel Cappe wrote, “We are all Keynesians now.” … National commissions are not new to us… who should lead this national commission on recovery? Why, Mark Carney, of course.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Debates | No Comments »


« Older Entries | Newer Entries »