« Older Entries |

Doug Ford surprises – by not gutting police oversight

Thursday, February 21st, 2019

confidence in the police, according to the Ford government, was undermined by a stillborn law that never got to impose steep fines on officers who refused to co-operate with the SIU, and never made it slightly easier to fire them for misconduct or incompetence. And so, the Ford government has now tabled the Comprehensive Ontario Police Services Act – yes, the COPS Act. The government is pitching it as a radical overhaul of Liberal police oversight, to make it more fair to police. Spoiler alert: It’s mostly not.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Let us now give thanks for Michael Wilson’s GST

Wednesday, February 13th, 2019

The GST was designed to be revenue-neutral; its goal was not increasing government revenue but instead raising it in a smarter, more progressive and more economically efficient way… Value-added taxes tax spending and encourage saving. Traditional sales taxes are regressive, falling hardest on low-income people, but credits for low-income Canadians make the GST progressive. The revenue is fairly stable. The system of input credits makes tax evasion far less likely than under a sales tax.

Tags: , ,
Posted in Governance History | No Comments »


The deterioration of data is robbing marginalized communities of their voice

Friday, February 8th, 2019

Even as policing agencies across the country tout the value of street checks as a tool for preventing and solving crime, data on their efficacy have typically not been studied nor reviewed by independently operated and funded oversight agencies… Canada’s data deficiencies are not merely problems of public policy: They reflect an unacceptable level of neglect that’s become an obstacle to our ability to advocate for ourselves.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Equality Policy Context | No Comments »


How Canada’s racial data gaps can be hazardous to your health

Thursday, February 7th, 2019

Little of this potentially life-saving information is available in Canada, which leads to a dearth of knowledge about who is most at risk. From health care to education to the justice system and the work force, Canada has long been reluctant to collect or publish data based on race and ethnicity… the United Nations has repeatedly rebuked Canada for its lack of data on the ethnic composition of its population. And an increasing number of people − from academics to community organizations – are pushing to close the gap.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Equality Policy Context | No Comments »


Full-day kindergarten keeps women in the work force. Let’s not mess with it

Thursday, February 7th, 2019

… since its full deployment, study after study has demonstrated the benefits for children and families. According to the University of Manitoba’s 2014 research, FDK “is especially beneficial for children of low socioeconomic status or educationally disadvantaged backgrounds.” For a government that purports to put Ontarians back to work to even consider changes to full-day kindergarten invites pause…

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Debates | No Comments »


America’s rich are facing a reckoning. It’s about time

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

A new Politico/Morning Consult poll released this week, as well as a recent Fox News poll, showed overwhelming support for more taxes on the wealthy. Even among Republicans, a majority are in favour of making the rich pay a greater share… They want to replace the neo-liberalism of the post-1980s with an economic paradigm which redistributes downward instead of up. It’s a tall order. Making the coddled class pay a larger share is necessary start.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Equality Debates | No Comments »


Tilting at windmills won’t solve our health-care woes

Monday, February 4th, 2019

Almost all health services are contracted out to private providers – doctors (most of whom are corporations), hospitals (which are not-for-profit corporations), pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies, device manufacturers (for-profit corporations), home care and long-term care facilities (a mix of non-profit and for-profit corporations) and so on…. we have the least-universal universal health-insurance system in the world. More than 30 per cent of care is paid for privately.

Tags: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Mental health is health care’s orphan

Saturday, February 2nd, 2019

The recent Health Accord between Canada and the provinces will invest $5-billion in mental-health services over 10 years, but spending will still be short of the annualized $3.1-billion investment that is required to reach the Mental Health Commission target of 9 per cent of health spending. 

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Countering political disinformation campaigns requires transparency

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

… if the purpose is to catch foreign efforts to sway the campaign with disinformation and divisive message, the definition of political ads is too narrow. Those Russian-paid ads didn’t always mention a candidate or a party. A real effort to try to counter disinformation campaigns would require some broadly open-source transparency for a larger class of paid messages. The big social-media companies seem to believe that clashes with their business model.

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Canada must set a higher bar on data protection in an era of ‘surveillance capitalism’

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

Companies should protect the data they manage, not exploit it. Every individual should own their own data. It should be yours, and yours only. Data protection and security should be paramount. Privacy should be embedded by design in the development of products and services… Now is the time for a robust discussion between policy-makers and the tech sector about how much regulatory oversight is needed, both to protect privacy and to spur innovation and competition.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


« Older Entries |