Posts Tagged ‘standard of living’

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Moving from theory to implementation on human rights and poverty

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2022

Where and how do we advocate for changes in the way our public systems operate so that people experience their human rights in their everyday lives? What can we learn from the way our community partners serve individuals and families? … the people who live with the consequences of our systems that are built to put and keep people in poverty, must be active participants in shaping the solutions that will impact their lives the most.

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Posted in Inclusion Delivery System | No Comments »


Doug Ford’s math on social assistance doesn’t add up — and doesn’t solve the problem of legislated poverty for people on ODSP

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2022

… none of the increases noted above come anywhere close enough to lift people on ODSP to a livable income, especially in the face of rampant inflation, years of stagnated rates and various “clawback” rules that reduce other sources of income… Doubling ODSP rates wouldn’t just mean more money in the pockets of clients — it would mean more money spent in local communities. It would mean reduced reliance on food banks and other public supports.

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Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


A catalyst to mend child welfare

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2022

… youth transitioned out of Ontario’s child protection system… experience low academic achievement, unemployment or underemployment, homelessness or housing insecurity, criminal justice system involvement, early parenthood, poor health and deep loneliness… The inquest presented the opportunity to change that approach, as it focused on the flaws in the system… and suggested how they could be fixed.

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Why voting for municipal action on affordable housing is in everyone’s interest

Monday, October 24th, 2022

Many people with mental illness and addictions, older adults, people with disabilities and victims of violence can only maintain housing with help. Encampments are a symptom of inadequate supportive housing. And demonstration projects have shown that supportive housing for high-need clients is cost effective, reducing service use in other sectors like hospitals, emergency services, policing and the criminal justice system. But this type of supported housing is woefully undersupplied.

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Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


What a new food-bank reports tells us about deep poverty

Thursday, October 20th, 2022

“We are failing people every step of the way”… Policy-makers have a selection of choices before them to slow or halt that cascade… but they boil down to this: either give people access to more money to buy food or help the charitable sector, like food banks, with more resources to bridge the gap. Right now, Yalnizyan adds, “the governments are doing none of the above.” 

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Strengthening the social safety net for people in greatest need

Saturday, October 15th, 2022

Maytree recommends that the federal government: 1. Transform part of the Canada Workers Benefit (CWB) into the proposed Canada Working-Age Supplement (CWAS)… 2. Enhance the Canada Housing Benefit so that it provides more consistent support to renters with lower incomes… 3. Work with provincial and territorial governments to ensure alignment with federal initiatives…

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Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


BICN Pre-Budget Submission to the Federal Finance Committee

Thursday, October 13th, 2022

A basic income is the kind of simpler, more automatic, counter-cyclic stabilizer we need, adjusting to ups and downs, maintaining a more even keel, making us more resilient… We can learn from CERB and from evidence amassed that a basic income is a far better option than what we have now. Statistical modelling shows it is affordable… We now urgently need a permanent basic income system that leaves no one behind

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More than 2%: A vision for feminist philanthropy

Wednesday, October 12th, 2022

This is where feminist philanthropy has a fresh opportunity to shine. It can fill gendered investment gaps and serve as a key part of the solution we activate today. Imagine what would happen if that 2% of charitable giving toward domestic gender equality and justice transformed to 10%. Imagine if it rose to parity, up to 50%.

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Posted in Equality Debates | No Comments »


Tackling the opioid crisis

Tuesday, October 11th, 2022

… statistics point us to two solutions: First, we need to regulate, rather than criminalize, all psychoactive drugs, and second, we ought to provide a safe supply of drugs to users. Those two solutions were, respectively, the “core” and “urgent” priorities identified by an expert task force last year, but so far, Ottawa has done relatively little toward making them a reality.

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Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


Correcting Course: Employment Insurance Needs a Redesign to Counter Recessions and Achieve Equity

Tuesday, October 11th, 2022

As a primary pillar of Canada’s social safety net, Employment Insurance (EI)… has also gone off track from its original main goal: to provide insurance against unpredictable job losses… The authors make three main policy recommendations: (i) Implement uniform or more universal entrance requirements. (ii) Sharply reduce the number of EI regions. (iii) Improve the responsiveness of the benefit duration formula to labour market downturns and recoveries.

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