• He’s worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’

    The share of migrant workers in Canada’s agricultural workforce has doubled in the last decade as what was once seasonal need for harvesters has turned into a year-round labour market reality. The workers pay income tax and employment insurance, and contribute to the Canada Pension Plan. However, their precarious status in Canada makes it difficult for them to exercise their rights and protections under labour laws, making them easy prey for unscrupulous recruiters and bad employers.

  • What minimum-wage critics don’t want you to know

    The most that any of these studies can claim is that employment will grow more slowly under higher minimum wages than in their absence. None predict that employment will decline… I am going out on a limb to predict that employment in all three provinces will increase with higher minimum wages – not because of them, of course, but because of factors (such as economic growth, population and aggregate demand) that matter most to employment. This is the perfect time to redirect growth so more benefit reaches those who need it most.

  • Most small businesses go nowhere, why tilt the tax system in their favour?

    The best way to stimulate productivity isn’t by subsidizing the creation of a lot of tiny, uncompetitive firms with no hope of going anywhere. It’s by opening the economy to competition and market disruption. Only we’re not terribly keen on either. We don’t need a pro-small business tax policy in this country. We need a pro-growth policy. And the starting point is to get rid of the small business deduction.

  • Doubling the length of tweets won’t fix Twitter’s real problem

    Twitter has irreversibly altered our sense of public discourse by convincing us that any argument worth having – religion/politics/racism – can be successfully advanced or bested in a 140-character feat of witty genius… Part of our accommodation consisted in us confusing ideas with information… tweets aren’t meant to be interrogated or analyzed. They aren’t meant to spur long, nuanced discussion – which is the kind of discussion our world desperately needs.

  • Ontario must toughen law to protect temporary workers

    … as it stands now hiring through temp agencies limits companies’ liability for accidents on the job, reduces their responsibility for making sure that employees’ legal rights are respected, and cuts costs — all at the expense of workers’ safety and earnings. The legislation now before the Ontario legislature does not address these concerns. As a result, the growing trend toward hiring temp workers — creating an increase in precarious work — may continue unabated.

  • Canadian tech leaders warn new tax rules may hinder startups, innovation agenda

    A common concern is the risk that Canada will become less competitive with the United States in terms of overall taxation, influencing corporate decisions over which side of the border to locate or expand… “We have to push back and say, ‘No, we’re going to stay in Canada.’ But you know what? If I don’t have any opportunity of actually cashing out in Canada, I will move down to the States and I’ll take all the jobs with me,”

  • Is a 21st-century model of labour relations emerging in Canada?

    … Canadian workers confront a daunting array of challenges and pressures: the need to keep up with technological change, which threatens jobs in a number of sectors; the fragmenting of the traditional employment relationship; powerful demographic changes that will mean little or no work-force growth; an aging population that is increasingly dependent on social programs; and the prospect of having to work much longer in life… So what is a 21st-century option that may help employers, employees and governments adapt to the many changes identified above?

  • Ontario corporations can afford to pay decent wages

    Less than 25 per cent of Ontario workers paid less than $15/hour are employed by small businesses…. major employers… [have] all enjoyed rising profits and they’ve paid their CEOs ever larger multimillion-dollar annual compensation packets. Their owners have accumulated billions in wealth in part because of the low wages they pay many of their employees. They can afford to pay their workers a decent wage.

  • How much will Morneau’s proposed tax changes cost small business? We do the math

    … financial experts to provide before-and-after scenarios of three of Ottawa’s proposed changes, including using corporations for so-called “income sprinkling” among family members; reducing the lifetime capital-gains allowance for a family; and so-called “passive” investment income, where a business owner invests money they don’t need right away in their corporation, at a lower tax rate, instead of taking it out as personal income, at a higher tax rate, and investing it.

  • How Canada got addicted to fentanyl

    The supply chain for illicit fentanyl begins in China, but the problems Canada is experiencing start right here at home: No other country in the world consumes more prescription opioids on a per-capita basis, according to a recent United Nations report. The widespread use of prescription opioids is behind the rise of a new class of drug addicts, many of whom are turning to the black market to feed their habit… many of those deaths could have been avoided.