Posts Tagged ‘disabilities’

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What are the key trends in Social Assistance Summaries, 2021?

Monday, July 25th, 2022

The analysis in this policy brief provides a first set of pathways for governments to improve the human right to an adequate standard of living of some of the most vulnerable people in Canada… federal, provincial, and territorial governments have long neglected [unattached singles], often preferring to focus on families with children and seniors. Because of this, welfare incomes of unattached singles have become highly inadequate, falling well below the deep poverty income threshold in almost every province.

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Posted in Social Security History | No Comments »


Social Assistance Summaries, 2021

Monday, July 25th, 2022

On average, there were over 595,000 cases (families and single adults) in Ontario’s social assistance programs during 2020-21. Over 36 per cent (217,234) were recipients of Ontario Works and 64 per cent (378,145) were recipients of the Ontario Disability Support Program… In 2020-21, on average, 7.6 per cent of people in Ontario under 65 received Ontario Works or the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), which is 1 in 13.

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Posted in Social Security Delivery System | No Comments »


How do we ‘fix’ Canadian health care? Not by forcing patients to pay

Thursday, July 7th, 2022

While we undoubtedly need to invest more public funds in our health care system, we need to do it transparently and strategically… Those looking to hand our health care system to corporate investors see a lucrative opportunity in private pay health care. It’s a seemingly simple and neat solution — but it’s wrong. If the pandemic has taught us anything, it’s that we need our publicly funded health care system to be there for all of us.

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Why we need to care about single adults living in poverty

Friday, July 1st, 2022

… single adults made up more than 60 per cent of OW cases and nearly 80 per cent of ODSP cases in 2021. Together, they equal the population of Ontario’s fastest growing city… The social assistance system was intended to be an emergency system – a last resort when all else failed. Well, all else is failing. Our other social systems are not preventing single adults from living in poverty. Rather, these systems are pushing people into poverty and holding them there… our social safety net is a relic of another era, as is our notion of who needs it.

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Liberals leave disability benefit bill in limbo as Parliament breaks for summer

Sunday, June 26th, 2022

When the bill was reintroduced… consultations were ongoing even as it took months for the government to bring the same bill back to the table for debate. The regulations will outline who would be eligible, the amount of the benefit, how often it will be paid and how, and an appeals process if applications are denied. There is also a big concern that the benefit might interact negatively with provincial programs resulting in clawbacks on other programs…

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Inadequate disability supports make the message clear: Your government will help you die, but not live with dignity

Sunday, June 5th, 2022

The toxic combination of inadequate income supports and skyrocketing inflation means that people who rely on disability benefits can no longer afford to live. And some are choosing not to… Let’s ensure that Canadians with disabilities living in poverty are not forced to choose between paying the bills or applying for the right to die.

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Ontario needs a government that will legislate health, not poverty

Sunday, May 29th, 2022

Low social assistance rates are not just legislated poverty — they are legislated destitution, and legislated poor health. Research has shown poor health is a direct consequence of living in poverty. These policy choices do not save us money — in fact, they provide people like us — legal aid lawyers and doctors — with a steady stream of business, paid for out of other pockets of the public purse. This election, none of the three major parties are offering enough to people living in deep poverty. 

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Ontario election gives voters the chance to choose people over profits in long-term care

Friday, May 27th, 2022

If… government replicates past decisions, more than 65,000 Ontarians a year will live in a for-profit facility — many run by corporations focused on their real estate investments — in the next decade. If we follow a different path, these subsidies could fund operators that are primarily care organizations and where real estate holdings support the care, not the other way around.

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Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


Canada Underinvests In Community Care

Tuesday, May 24th, 2022

Canada’s per capita spending on homecare and other outpatient and day program services falls below the international average. In general, countries that direct higher proportions of health spending to seniors care than Canada also spend more per capita on home care, outpatient care and day programs for seniors.

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Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


It’s election time and Ontario still chooses not to eliminate poverty

Tuesday, May 10th, 2022

During the campaign, Ontarians will hear a lot of about affordability, except those conversations will not focus on those who can afford the least… no matter who wins this election, people who need social assistance will find themselves in the same place they were in before the election, and the election before that. They will still be in deep, deep poverty. 

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Posted in Inclusion Debates | No Comments »


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