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Poverty costs Ontario up to $33B annually, new report says

Friday, October 4th, 2019

The study, entitled The Cost of Poverty in Ontario, examines the relationship between poverty, poor health, the justice system and lost productivity. It makes the economic case that investing in people by reducing poverty is not only socially responsible but financially sound. The loss of what’s known as “opportunity income” accounts for the largest chunk of the cost of poverty — $19.4 to $25 billion — followed by health care with $3.9 billion.

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Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


Critics call it ‘shortsighted’ and ‘wrong’, but Ontario government moving forward with municipal funding cuts

Wednesday, August 21st, 2019

Ford said some of this year’s planned cuts — to public health, child care and land ambulance funding — will take effect Jan. 1… The new plan will see all municipalities — including Toronto — pay 30 per cent of public health care costs… municipalities will also have to pay 20 per cent of the cost of creating new child-care spaces, which the province previously fully funded.

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Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Justin Trudeau’s carbon tax is revenue neutral… for now

Wednesday, April 24th, 2019

… higher-income Canadians will only be refunded a fraction of the carbon taxes they’ll pay, while low-income Canadians, in general, will get back more than the tax costs them… It punishes people who use more energy, usually those with higher incomes, who tend to have bigger houses and more luxurious cars, or boats, or cottages, and it rewards people who use less… In general, conservatives aren’t keen on wealth redistribution. Liberals are.

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Posted in Governance Policy Context | No Comments »


40% of Ontario full-time post-secondary students granted free tuition, CBC analysis shows

Monday, February 4th, 2019

“How many of them were able to quit a part-time job and focus solely on their studies because of this grant? How many of them didn’t need to access mental health resources this year because they weren’t worried about making ends meet?” … although 24 per cent more university students and 27 per cent more college students were issued financial aid in the 2017-18 academic year, the total number of students accessing higher education for the first time stayed virtually the same.

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Posted in Education Debates | No Comments »


‘Wealth equals health,’ Canadian doctors say

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

13 August 2012
Canadians earning less than $30,000 a year and have less than a high school education were more likely to describe their health as fair or poor, 16 per cent, compared with those earning $60,000 or more, six per cent, and those with a university degree or higher, seven per cent… 45 per cent, said there is too much to know about healthy eating… The same was true for physical activity levels and income… More than one in five Canadians… said they’d delayed or cancelled a dentist appointment because of financial concerns.

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Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Historic First Nations summit may not yield concrete outcomes

Saturday, January 21st, 2012

Jan 19, 2012
First Nations chiefs want to negotiate a cabinet-approved timeline with the federal government that would see concrete improvements for native communities…. Immediate challenges could include inadequate funding for housing, child welfare, education and water. Long-term issues include crafting a pathway to self-governance and recognition of treaty rights, creating a more reliable fiscal framework, economic development, financial transparency and speeding up talks on comprehensive land claims.

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Posted in Equality Debates | 1 Comment »


The Decline of Smoking in Canada

Wednesday, August 17th, 2011

Jul 29, 2011
The latest Statistics Canada figures show smoking rates are fairly stable. In 2010, 20.8 per cent of Canadians aged 12 and over — about six million people — were smokers. Five years ago, there were 5.9 million smokers or 22 per cent of the population. In 2003, 23 per cent of Canadians aged 12 or older, smoked… In 2001, 73 per cent of youth said they never smoked cigarettes. In 2005, the percentage rose to 82 per cent. This finding is key because most smokers start before age 18, and research shows that it is rare for adults to take up smoking.

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Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


More than 30 groups unite in $15.5m effort to prevent chronic disease

Thursday, February 4th, 2010

Wednesday, February 3, 2010.

About two-thirds of deaths in Canada are due to chronic diseases, many of which – like heart disease and many cancers – can be prevented through healthier lifestyles and healthier communities.

Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


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