• We can no longer afford to whitewash our history

    The headlines about the residential schools was the catalyst that made the government admit that the history we’ve been taught has been whitewashed. All Canadian children need to know that their culture has made contributions to Canadian society… Writing workshops were scheduled this summer to update the curriculum…. But one month after the Ontario election, just before the legislature resumed, these workshops, years in the making, were suddenly cancelled.

  • Ontario families to launch human-rights challenge against sex-ed curriculum rollback

    Six families plan to file a case with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario in the next week, noting that the old version of the curriculum makes no mention of issues such as gender diversity or the rights of LGBTQ students… The government’s decision to repeal the modernized curriculum violates the province’s human rights code and should be declared unlawful, their lawyers said… a parent from Guelph, Ont., credits the 2015 curriculum for making his daughter’s gender transition almost “seamless.”

  • Health-care professionals speak out against changing Ontario’s sex-ed curriculum

    Nearly 1,800 health-care professionals are adding their voices to those urging the provincial government to keep the updated sex-ed curriculum… saying the old curriculum — which was used starting in 1998 — is unsafe for kids… many educators are worried that by teaching the outdated lessons they will actually be violating “their professional obligation to protect the health and well-being of students,” and that the Canadian Civil Liberties Association says schools boards are required to be inclusive.

  • Think education in Ontario doesn’t need to be protected as a human right? Think again

    If you have access to education, you are more likely to know your rights, and know how to advocate for yourself and for others… By framing education as a fundamental human right, we place the emphasis on education for all without discrimination; the obligation of states to protect, respect and fulfil this right; and the need for accountability mechanisms when people cannot realize their right.

  • Addressing poverty, not policing, is solution to gun violence

    Providing opportunities, programs and social supports for daycare aged children as young as two, all the way through to assisting youth to pursue post-secondary education, it is resources rather than enforcement that go a long way to address poverty… Decades of research… all highlight the need to support and not punish our communities.

  • ‘No Jab, No Pay’. In Australia, no excuse accepted for unvaccinated kids

    The financial penalty for non-vaccination is imposed principally on the poor – those who receive income-tested benefits – while it is wealthier parents who are most likely to eschew vaccination… But the majority of parents of unvaccinated and under-vaccinated kids are not dogmatic; they are overwhelmed, usually by monetary and logistical issues. What they need are not financial penalties, but practical help – carrots, not sticks.

  • Education reform must be on the table in Ontario

    In 2018-19, Ontario will spend $29.1 billion on K-12 education, representing one-fifth of all program spending in the province… That places Ontario third in per student spending among the provinces, behind only Alberta and Saskatchewan, and more than 20% higher than neighbouring Quebec… Many Ontarians are likely unaware of how unique Ontario’s K-12 education system is compared to the other provinces. Ontario is one of only three provinces that deliver religious education

  • As gun violence spikes, Toronto faces a reckoning on the root causes of tragedy

    “The feeling of disadvantage and unfairness leads the poor to seek compensation and satisfaction by all means, including committing crimes… These kids feel a sense of social isolation. They don’t feel part of anything,” … There’s growing consensus that gun and gang violence is not a problem the city can arrest its way out of.

  • New Report Shows Child Poverty in Canada Knows no Boundaries

    … over 1.2 million children, or 17.4%, are living in poverty with their families. That’s the finding from Campaign 2000’s riding by riding analysis of child poverty in Canada, released June 18th, 2018… Significant child poverty exists in every one of Canada’s 338 ridings. It brings to light the disparities that exist in ridings home to both extreme wealth and deep poverty. One such example is the riding of Toronto Centre [where]… Four out of ten (40%) children live in poverty…

  • How We All Can Help Improve Indigenous Child Welfare Today

    … while we’re doing the hard work of implementing a new way of doing Indigenous child welfare, what could be done right now to help Indigenous families and kids in the current system? … offer Indigenous control, seek prevention, stop taking kids into care altogether… But other actions, some big and some small, don’t just need government to move forward. They need the buy-in, co-operation and good faith effort from everyone in Canada.