• Housing to Health helps clients turn place to live into a home

    Housing to Health (H2H), the first housing initiative in York Region that aims to secure housing for the chronically homeless… succeeded in housing 30 of its hardest to house community members… H2H focuses mainly on ensuring participants remain housed. “We try to wrap supports around the individual” … given that many participants have a history of trauma, addiction, and mental health struggles, “we try to help maintain a good relationship,”

  • The road out of poverty starts with care

    The community benefit agreement has been established to help young people, a concept endorsed by all three levels of government, Zanotti said. “This partnership … is ensuring through policy at Queen’s Park that 10 per cent of apprentices hired through Crosstown are young people from our priority neighbourhoods who are facing multiple barriers, youth who might need that first job, or need to complete their education. This will be the new model of public investments.”

  • Universities should not smother uncomfortable debates

    Universities, at their best, have always provided space for those who would challenge conventional wisdom. In this way, the academy has played a vital role in our social and cultural evolution… In these polarized times, this age-old struggle has become increasingly combative and dangerously divisive, with some on campus railing against political correctness to justify their hate and others imposing purity tests that chill rather than enable debate.

  • Poverty-law lawyer Vince Calderhead’s mission to change the justice system

    Mr. Calderhead, 63, is a social justice litigator who has spent more than 30 years working on behalf of the poor as a legal-aid staffer in Nova Scotia. He is nationally renowned for his unique approach to poverty law – an approach that for years has centred on pressing courts to strike down legislation that violates the protections he sees impoverished people as entitled to under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

  • He’s worked legally in Canada for 37 years but the government considers him ‘temporary’

    The share of migrant workers in Canada’s agricultural workforce has doubled in the last decade as what was once seasonal need for harvesters has turned into a year-round labour market reality. The workers pay income tax and employment insurance, and contribute to the Canada Pension Plan. However, their precarious status in Canada makes it difficult for them to exercise their rights and protections under labour laws, making them easy prey for unscrupulous recruiters and bad employers.

  • Unpacking the Social Innovation Strategies of Canadian Foundations

    the social innovation behaviours of foundations can offer insight into what actors that seek to do social innovation need, and what actors that seek to fund social innovation consider. We interviewed 38 staff and board members from 18 Canadian philanthropic foundations operating in all regions of Canada… to understand what foundations mean when they use the term social innovation and how, if at all, they are acting to promote it.

  • Michelle Kungl’s incredible journey

    … her experience highlights the problem most people on social assistance face when they try to work or receive income from other sources. More than 900,000 Ontarians rely on social assistance, including more than 490,000 on ODSP. Barely 10 per cent of individuals receiving ODSP have employment income… the government has already increased the amount individuals and families can deduct from their earnings for disability-work related expenses from $300 to $1,000 a month.

  • Freeing our people: Updates from the long road to deinstitutionalization

    How can we expect any better from society when our own government continues to fund deeply segregated, dehumanizing and dangerous forms of support for people with intellectual disabilities? Out of sight, out of mind has hidden many disturbing facts about intellectual disability from the public for far too long… These wrongs must be righted and further abuse prevented. We need to bring the “left behind” forward if we are to become an inclusive and accessible country.

  • There’s no cure for autism — my daughter is wonderful just the way she is

    My daughter doesn’t have a special talent or ability, and she isn’t a quirky genius. She may never live independently or hold down a successful career. But these are arbitrary measurements of success, and she doesn’t need to achieve them to be valuable and worthwhile. What she needs is the freedom to be herself — as flappy, happy and autistic as she may be.

  • Mentally ill people need to be calmed down, not shot

    No one is suggesting that police stand there and allow themselves to be stabbed or beaten. De-escalation training teaches that not drawing a weapon in the first place can prevent the threats; offering help instead of screaming “drop the weapon,” can change an interaction… police forces now employ crisis intervention teams that include unarmed social workers, backed up by police who carry shields and tasers instead of guns.