• Charity laws must evolve with the times

    The just-released Ontario Superior Court decision squashes the notion that charities cannot fully engage in political activities. The charity Canada Without Poverty took the Canada Revenue Agency to court over its ruling that the group should lose its charitable status… In this case, the purpose of relieving poverty is with the sharing of ideas, not nutrition.

  • A new definition on affordable housing is needed

    … Toronto wound up with an affordable housing program that doesn’t actually produce much affordable rental housing. Instead, it results in housing that’s pegged to the city’s average market rents. Certainly, that’s not bad housing and it fills a need. But it does not fill the needs of Toronto’s low-income tenants as the city is so keen to suggest it does.

  • A new definition on affordable housing is needed

    In a city like Toronto the cost of housing has risen far faster than incomes, making the average market rent calculation meaningless when it comes to defining affordability. That’s why the city has an affordable housing crisis that sees low-income residents living in homeless shelters; waiting for years to get into social housing where rents are affordable; and struggling to make monthly paycheques stretch to cover the rent and still put food on the table.

  • The refugee ‘crisis’ originates far from our borders

    … in 2017 just over 50,000 asylum claims — irregular or otherwise — were processed. Yet somehow a population that is less than one per cent of Canada’s population has come to constitute a “crisis.” If there is any crisis, it is one of political will and compassionate policy.

  • The Connections Between Us: Learning to Leverage the Power of a Network Approach

    The network structure provides flexibility, responsiveness, transparency, openness, and inclusiveness. A network approach also helps identify common cause, while distributing power and resources to involve many people in building solutions. It allows people to find one another through trusted connections so they can work together in reciprocal ways… Thus, networks have become useful in developing public policy approaches.

  • As gun violence spikes, Toronto faces a reckoning on the root causes of tragedy

    “The feeling of disadvantage and unfairness leads the poor to seek compensation and satisfaction by all means, including committing crimes… These kids feel a sense of social isolation. They don’t feel part of anything,” … There’s growing consensus that gun and gang violence is not a problem the city can arrest its way out of.

  • The CRA makes life more difficult for people with disabilities

    … in a report titled Breaking Down Barriers. The senators make some sensible recommendations about fixing the DTC [Disability Tax Credit] and related programs, and even about the treatment of people with disabilities more generally. The two most important suggestions are that the DTC become a refundable (as opposed to a non-refundable) tax credit so it would benefit the most needy… [and] that everyone in a provincial program for people with disabilities be enrolled automatically in the registered disability savings program.

  • Immigrants make Canada the envy of the world

    Canada “is a country that does not ask about your origins; it only concerns itself with your destiny.” Those words were spoken by Peter Munk, founder and chairman of the Barrick Gold Corporation…
    The philanthropist who ensured that the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre offered the very best health care that Canadian patients and their families could hope for… was also an immigrant… Peter Munk’s story is one we hear time and again – immigrants who devote their lives to making Canada even better.

  • A word to the wise: Why wisdom might be ripe for rediscovery

    … modern scholarly definitions mention certain traits: compassion and prosocial attitudes that reflect concern for the common good; pragmatic knowledge of life; the use of one’s pragmatic knowledge to resolve personal and social problems; an ability to cope with ambiguity and uncertainty and to see multiple points of view; emotional stability and mastery of one’s feelings; a capacity for reflection and for dispassionate self-understanding.

  • Canada’s multiculturalism is our identity

    On Oct. 8, 1971, … In addition to becoming an officially bilingual land, Canada would formally respect the diversity of its citizens’ languages, religions and cultures. The goal was integration; it was also about appeasing opposition to bilingualism. Mr. Trudeau faced no opposition in the House… quietly over the next decades, official multiculturalism lost its hokey qualities, as well as its capital letter, and evolved into an ingrained collective value.