• A gift to Canada: Lifting people out of poverty benefits us all

    Pervasive poverty has a negative impact on us all – it affects children, their nutrition, and their ability to learn and grow; it makes our communities less inclusive; it drives up costs for health care and infrastructure; and it limits our country’s economic growth and competitiveness… We also believe in the critical importance of public policy as a driver of social change… strategy must address four key themes – prosperity, opportunity, inclusion and reconciliation.

  • Four Principles that Can End Chronic Homelessness

    … success rested on four critical interventions: permanent supportive housing; rapid rehousing; a Housing First approach; and not criminalizing people experiencing homelessness… 70 communities, including Bergen, invested in a “problem-solving toolkit” designed to offer flexible solutions that respond to evolving challenges… The toolkit offers solutions based on four categories: data analytics; human-centred design; quality improvement; and facilitation.

  • Canada’s charitable sector is more diverse than (some) rating agencies think

    While rigorous accreditation processes… and charity rating agencies… are not exactly the same, the sentiment is similar – people looking for some form of assessment about the impact of organizations. The challenge is that some of the criteria and metrics used by charity rating agencies in Canada are not effective, and are in fact misleading.

  • Common misconceptions about homelessness

    First, we should move away from a standard housing policy toward a person-centered approach that responds to individuals’ needs. We should recognize that people who are homeless often have networks; someone may not have a home but may still have a home neighbourhood… Second, we need to integrate harm reduction approaches into housing policies…

  • To solve Canada’s social housing problem, we should look to Britain’s privatization schemes

    … the needy would be able to rent newly-built, city-owned houses at subsidized rates for a fixed period of 10 to 15 years. The houses would then be offered for sale at a discount, with the tenants having first dibs at becoming owners of their own homes — something that is beyond reach for most renters… tenants will be likely to set aside the money they’ll need for the ultimate down payment 10 or 15 years hence, invest in their property’s upkeep, and develop a commitment to the safety of the neighbourhoods

  • Forces of Change: Reshaping How Non-Profit Organizations are Governed, Managed, and Resourced

    There is a growing awareness that “underinvestment in administration is unproductive” (Mowat NFP, 2015) and that “belt tightening has its limits and at some point starts to damage vital organs” (Broadhead, 2010)… Board roles and responsibilities have expanded and become more sophisticated… Governance decisions will increasingly be made outside the single organization board… Increasing expectations for more variety and greater input is fundamentally changing the relationships with stakeholders.

  • Tory should commit city money to fixing the social housing problem, then ask the province for help

    “The time for action is now. In fact it was before now, because repairing social housing is a moral, economic and social imperative,” Tory said last week. Really? Why, then, do you not increase the city’s allocation of funds to repair the damaged buildings? Why are you promoting a freeze in property taxes instead of a dedicated 1 or 2 per cent increase to build a fund that stops the closures?

  • Don’t let social housing crumble

    … allowing the corporation’s units to keep deteriorating and be shut down would lead to higher health-care spending, rising crime and a host of other social costs… investing in repairs would create thousands of jobs, spur private investment, and generate billions of extra dollars in federal and provincial taxes. For both social and economic reasons, the provincial and federal governments must commit money for much-needed repairs before this crisis deepens.

  • Look twice before judging an Indigenous person

    The paradigm we occupy, our reality, is merely the confluence of multiple stories. One of those stories is the lazy, dirty, drunken Indian story… The story doesn’t just impact non-aboriginal people. It is heard and understood by aboriginal peoples as well. It affects how we see the world… Anyone who claims not to be racist – who doesn’t check their stories with every encounter – fails themselves as well as others.

  • Forget ‘cultural appropriation’ — it’s about censorship

    What about the indigenous groups, and indeed, whites, who denounced Sen. Lynn Beyak as a racist… for pointing out that residential schools, for all the evil they did, did some good as well, a view shared by some indigenous people? That isn’t about cultural appropriation… It’s about silencing people — and points of view — by leveling false allegations of racism against them and intimidating others who share their views.