• Forget ‘cultural appropriation’ — it’s about censorship

    What about the indigenous groups, and indeed, whites, who denounced Sen. Lynn Beyak as a racist… for pointing out that residential schools, for all the evil they did, did some good as well, a view shared by some indigenous people? That isn’t about cultural appropriation… It’s about silencing people — and points of view — by leveling false allegations of racism against them and intimidating others who share their views.

  • I ran a charity for years. Joe Oliver is wrong about the damage his government did

    … advocating for a change in law or policy is not the same thing as political activism … at all… If a senior citizens’ charity decided to run a public campaign urging for crosswalks to be replaced with traffic lights at crossings near seniors’ homes, that would also be considered a political activity… How can charities make the world a better place if they’re not able to identify laws and policies that should be changed?

  • Ontario Parents want help for their developmentally delayed adult-age children

    Lengthy waiting lists remain for as many as 14,000 families whose children turn 18 and have to reapply for aid as they are cut off from funding they have enjoyed for years… the Liberals have doubled the budget for people with developmental disabilities since taking office in 2003. It now stands at $2.1 billion and last month’s provincial budget would increase that by $677 million

  • Time to turn inclusive innovation rhetoric into reality

    … given that economies are no better than the societies in which they are embedded, it is critical that business leaders turn their attention to them. We desperately need to maximize both growth and equality in society – the consequences of not doing so are dire. DSIPs offer a venue of constructive private-public experimentation.

  • A welcome end to charity audits

    The announcement came last week in response to a panel report that recommended the audits, initiated by the Harper government, be suspended immediately. That will give the government time to make recommended administrative and legislative changes aimed at giving charities more freedom to speak out on public policy.

  • Take the politics out of charity? Far better to just cancel the tax break

    If I give to my preferred charity with my own money, that is entirely my affair. But if I claim a tax credit on it, I am effectively forcing you and everyone else to pay for it as well… There is nothing voluntary in my conscription of your assistance. Neither is there much of the charitable spirit in demanding to be recompensed for what ought to be given freely.

  • The Jane Addams Model

    She sought to change the world by planting herself deeply in a particular neighborhood. She treated each person as a unique soul… There are many philanthropists and caregivers today who dislike theory and just want to get practical. It is this sort of doer’s arrogance and intellectual laziness that explains why so many charities do no good or do positive harm.

  • Urgent action needed to halt shut-down of social-housing units

    TCHC recently announced that it will be closing about 400 units next year because it doesn’t have enough money to repair them. That’s on top of 600 units already slated to be shut down this year…. the TCHC has a decade-long, $2.6-billion repair plan. But… TCHC says it can only access about $82 million [next year]. So once again the city is looking to the province and to Ottawa to do their part.

  • Ottawa should fix perversely punitive pardon policy

    … the pardon policy has created an unjust cycle of disadvantage without yielding any apparent benefits. Released offenders often require a pardon before they can travel, get a job or find housing. By denying the rehabilitated their earned right to re-enter society, the new pardon rules inevitably increase the burden on the welfare system, not to mention the likelihood of recidivism.

  • Liberals set homeless reduction targets ahead of provincial talks

    The upcoming national housing strategy looks to cut by 50 per cent the number of “chronic” homeless — many of whom won’t go to shelters and may be harder to reach through traditional support systems — and “episodic” homeless, those who find themselves on the street repeatedly… The Liberals’ second budget in March showed that they wanted to get money directly to cities and service providers without having to deal with provinces.