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Here’s what happens when the gender-gap index is adjusted for bias

Wednesday, January 9th, 2019

The researchers propose a truly gender-neutral set of metrics for calculating equality scores, named the Basic Index of Gender Inequality (BIGI). BIGI focuses on three factors: educational opportunities (literacy, years of primary and secondary education), healthy life expectancy (years expected to live in good health), and overall life satisfaction which, taken together, are the “minimum ingredients of a good life.” These metrics can be applied anywhere, regardless of income level, cultural paradigm or national economic development tier.

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Posted in Equality Debates | No Comments »


Addiction is a ‘disease’ … of choice

Friday, September 28th, 2012

Sep 26, 2012
Most addicts stop using by an act of will, and are motivated to do so by simple cost-benefit calculations. Heyman points to age 30 as the usual cutoff, the age when people get serious about careers and mating… Heyman agrees that addicts are genetically predisposed to addiction, but he gives great credit to voluntary control over inclinations.

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Posted in Child & Family Debates | 2 Comments »


It takes two to raise a child

Wednesday, February 15th, 2012

Feb 15, 2012
… the U.K. government announced its intention to amend the 1989 Children’s Act. Changes will include a “presumption of shared parenting” to ensure that children’s relationships with both parents continues after separation. Under the current adversarial system, as in Canada, legal custody battles almost invariably end with mothers gaining sole custody… ESP is objectively fair to both sexes and to children, and thus a win-win-win policy. Over 70% of ordinary Canadians prefer it.

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Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


When it comes to charity, Quebec still can’t find its wallet

Thursday, December 15th, 2011

Dec 15, 2011
Quebec is the least religious of the provinces (and in fact the most militantly anti-religious). Quebec is also the most statist (and highly taxed) of the provinces. Quebecers figure their taxes are taking care of all the social problems, or should be taking care of them, and it is therefore no surprise that they are the least likely to take responsibility for the afflictions of others. Which is a great argument against statism… Statism tends to suffocate the blessing of empathy. Statism promotes civic immaturity. One more in a long litany of reasons for working to bring down the size of government.

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Posted in Inclusion Delivery System | No Comments »


Don’t regulate prostitutes. Rescue them

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

October 5, 2010
In the pathetic demi-monde of lower-tier prostitution — streetwalkers, drug addicts, child-trafficked aboriginal children — it isn’t regulation that is needed. Robert Picton’s victims wouldn’t have taken advantage of (or been welcome at) legal brothels. Such women, neither autonomous nor opportunistic, are victims of circumstances, who haven’t the luxury of choice. These women don’t need the “harm reduction” of legal enablement. They need rescue. Their plight would only worsen with legalization, because it would discourage efforts to save them.

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Posted in Child & Family Debates | No Comments »


Give fathers their rights back

Sunday, September 26th, 2010

Sept. 22, 2010.
s there anyone who believes that our family court system doesn’t need reform? Perhaps some aging radical feminists who are content with the fact that fathers are offered shared or sole residential custody in only about 6% of court-contested cases. And of course the myriad of professionals — lawyers above all — who benefit financially in dragging out litigation, mostly unrelated to children’s best interests, and who perpetuate a dehumanizing and heartbreaking — but lucrative –winner-take-all style of “justice.”

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Posted in Child & Family Debates | 1 Comment »


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