Posts Tagged ‘immigration’

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We can no longer afford to whitewash our history

Sunday, August 12th, 2018

The headlines about the residential schools was the catalyst that made the government admit that the history we’ve been taught has been whitewashed. All Canadian children need to know that their culture has made contributions to Canadian society… Writing workshops were scheduled this summer to update the curriculum…. But one month after the Ontario election, just before the legislature resumed, these workshops, years in the making, were suddenly cancelled.

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Posted in Education History, Inclusion History | No Comments »


Canada Can Benefit Economically from the Asylum Seeker Surge

Monday, July 30th, 2018

Canada’s support for refugee seekers can be more than just a humanitarian stand. It can lead to an economic benefit to host provinces. How? According to Statistics Canada, job vacancies (unadjusted for seasonality) increased by 19.3 percent from the first quarter of 2017 to more than 462,000 in the first quarter of 2018… Remarkably, a sizable share of these available jobs did not require previous work experience or a minimum education level.

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Labour force participation, immigration headline OECD’s Canada report

Tuesday, July 24th, 2018

… the OECD recommended, among other things, that Canada invest more in affordable child care, raise its retirement age and do a better job matching immigration applicants’ qualifications and experience to specific skills needs… “Get people to work longer or retire later, increasing female participation – that kind of thing has a bigger effect than changes in feasible amounts of immigration,”

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The refugee ‘crisis’ originates far from our borders

Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

… in 2017 just over 50,000 asylum claims — irregular or otherwise — were processed. Yet somehow a population that is less than one per cent of Canada’s population has come to constitute a “crisis.” If there is any crisis, it is one of political will and compassionate policy.

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The Connections Between Us: Learning to Leverage the Power of a Network Approach

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

The network structure provides flexibility, responsiveness, transparency, openness, and inclusiveness. A network approach also helps identify common cause, while distributing power and resources to involve many people in building solutions. It allows people to find one another through trusted connections so they can work together in reciprocal ways… Thus, networks have become useful in developing public policy approaches.

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Ford’s win exposes the angry blind spot of Canadian democracy

Saturday, June 9th, 2018

… a majority of males between the ages of 20 and 55 appears to have handed Doug Ford power over the next four years, and his supporters are, by and large, anything but optimistic about the economy or, for that matter, anything else… The trigger of their discontent is that they belong to that sizeable chunk of the province’s population who have been standing still or moving backward in the economy over the past 30 or so years, and who do not see things getting better in the future.

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Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


Immigrants make Canada the envy of the world

Tuesday, June 5th, 2018

Canada “is a country that does not ask about your origins; it only concerns itself with your destiny.” Those words were spoken by Peter Munk, founder and chairman of the Barrick Gold Corporation…
The philanthropist who ensured that the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre offered the very best health care that Canadian patients and their families could hope for… was also an immigrant… Peter Munk’s story is one we hear time and again – immigrants who devote their lives to making Canada even better.

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Canada’s multiculturalism is our identity

Friday, April 27th, 2018

On Oct. 8, 1971, … In addition to becoming an officially bilingual land, Canada would formally respect the diversity of its citizens’ languages, religions and cultures. The goal was integration; it was also about appeasing opposition to bilingualism. Mr. Trudeau faced no opposition in the House… quietly over the next decades, official multiculturalism lost its hokey qualities, as well as its capital letter, and evolved into an ingrained collective value.

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Canada in 2018 is a country of global citizens

Monday, April 16th, 2018

Who would have guessed that 150 years after Confederation, Canada would become one of the most peaceably diverse societies on earth? Like other countries, we have many challenges to address and far to go to live up to the values we claim – but Canada has come a long way: from a colony of deferential subjects to a country of global citizens.

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The intolerance industry is working overtime in Canada

Tuesday, April 3rd, 2018

Should we split each other into a bunch of identity groups squabbling over the spoils? Or should we stress our common values and do our best to make sure that everybody has a fair shot? Must we claim, as lots of people do, that Canada is rotten with every kind of “ism” and phobia? Or can we acknowledge that we really are a pretty fair and just society that’s trying to do better? … I believe the way forward should be rooted in pride and confidence, not accusations and shame.

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Posted in Equality Debates | No Comments »


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