Posts Tagged ‘ideology’

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Lessons from Ontario’s Basic Income Pilot

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

Michael Mendelson looks at Ontario’s experience to offer lessons on how to – and how not to – set up future Basic Income trials. The report focuses in particular on three aspects of the pilot in which the experimental design fell short: lack of a “saturation” site, problems of enrollment, and use of the income tax system to test recipients’ income… The author also suggests a five-step process for governments considering another Basic Income experiment…

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Posted in Social Security Policy Context | No Comments »


Liberals are the best choice for Canada

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

… despite the failings of the Liberals, this is the time to focus on what’s truly important in the long run… to make sure the wealth is more evenly shared. It cut taxes on the middle class, raised them on the wealthy and directed a lot more support to families with the new Canada Child Benefit… A re-elected Liberal government would also add to the child benefit that has been so vital to reducing poverty. It would finally put a tax on Big Tech companies that haven’t been paying their share. And, very importantly, it would stick to its plan to reduce carbon emissions

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Posted in Governance Debates | No Comments »


The tax cuts you might vote for, but might not notice

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

Would someone earning over $60,000 notice that they got another $420 a year by 2023 through the Conservative Party’s Universal Tax Cut? … if someone handed you $420 in 2023, you’d notice. But that’s not how this tax cut is going to be delivered. It’ll be incremental… Surely there must be a better way to spend over $5.5 billion a year. Couldn’t this money be better spent on healthcare, housing, infrastructure, and/or paying down the deficit?

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The (Conservative) platform that dare not speak its name

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

Scaling back infrastructure spending could have consequences, but they won’t be immediate, and they may be hard for voters to spot… the Conservatives are raising taxes. Yes, really. They’re promising a 3-per-cent tax on foreign social-media platforms, search engines and online marketplaces, inspired by similar levies in Europe… The Conservatives would also give the Canada Revenue Agency $750-million a year to figure out who isn’t paying as much tax as they should.

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Civil servants get the Rolls Royce of pharmacare while party leaders can’t even muster a decent plan

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

… opinion polls show most Canadians do support a national insurance scheme for prescription drugs. Will election promises bring the benefits Canadians need?… Unless whoever forms the federal government after the election provides: adequate resources for good-quality national pharmacare, a guarantee of long-term funding, and a roadmap for integrating it with existing provincial programs, Canadians hoping for improved access to medicines are unlikely to be satisfied.

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Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


First and foremost, the homeless need housing

Monday, October 14th, 2019

Despite some notable success stories, most people don’t magically get better when housing is available… people with severe mental-health issues, substance-use disorders and the other illnesses and social challenges that come along with them need a lot of support… Housing first is a way of saying we haven’t given up on people and on the belief that homelessness can be, if not eliminated, at least managed more effectively and humanely.

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It’s a No-Brainer — Tax the Billionaires!

Monday, October 14th, 2019

TheTyee.ca – Opinion 9 Oct 2019.   Michal Rozworski , TheTyee.ca Michal Rozworski is an economist, writer and author (with Leigh Phillips) of The People’s Republic of Walmart. He is a research associate with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. A wealth tax wouldn’t just bring in revenue. It would curb the out-of-control political power of the […]

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A primer on Indigenous issues and the pledges in this election

Monday, October 14th, 2019

Indigeneity is intrinsically linked to the environment, and vice versa… One of the issues at the forefront of Indigenous health and wellness and the all-too-frequent inequities in care is the lack of clean, safe drinking water in many communities… Mental health is also a major issue: the suicide rate among Indigenous youth is five to seven times higher than among non-Indigenous youth… Indigenous children are still falling through jurisdictional cracks, and… equitable care should involve [Jordan’s] principle being expanded to family services, education and even the justice system.

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Posted in Equality Delivery System | No Comments »


To close the wage gap, focus on child care

Saturday, October 12th, 2019

Canada could add $150 billion to its economy over the next eight years if more women entered and advanced in the workplace. That’s exactly what research shows universal, affordable child care helps women do. Child care is the most effective way to close the wage gap, but it’s about more than that. It’s also about reducing poverty, increasing employment, helping families and growing the economy.

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Prison breaking-point: Canada’s jail system is in crisis, and that affects all of us

Saturday, October 12th, 2019

Prison conditions have become abject… and fixing that will cost money. But investment now, as well as work to reduce the prison population – namely, by eliminating mandatory minimum sentences and expanding supervised community programs – will vastly reduce prison costs, keep people in their communities and save Ottawa from costly legal challenges in the future.

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Posted in Child & Family Policy Context | No Comments »


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