Posts Tagged ‘budget’

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Charting the Path to National Pharmacare in Canada

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

… a federally financed, regulated and administered pharmacare program… is constitutionally feasible because of the federal government’s current jurisdiction over drug safety, price regulation and patent protection. While it is generally assumed that federalism and provincial jurisdiction over health stand in the way of a federal government public single payer program, the provinces have supported this option in the past, with the caveat that special arrangements may have to be made for Quebec.

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Tilting at windmills won’t solve our health-care woes

Monday, February 4th, 2019

Almost all health services are contracted out to private providers – doctors (most of whom are corporations), hospitals (which are not-for-profit corporations), pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies, device manufacturers (for-profit corporations), home care and long-term care facilities (a mix of non-profit and for-profit corporations) and so on…. we have the least-universal universal health-insurance system in the world. More than 30 per cent of care is paid for privately.

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40% of Ontario full-time post-secondary students granted free tuition, CBC analysis shows

Monday, February 4th, 2019

“How many of them were able to quit a part-time job and focus solely on their studies because of this grant? How many of them didn’t need to access mental health resources this year because they weren’t worried about making ends meet?” … although 24 per cent more university students and 27 per cent more college students were issued financial aid in the 2017-18 academic year, the total number of students accessing higher education for the first time stayed virtually the same.

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We know the problems in health care; get moving on the fix

Monday, February 4th, 2019

… either the Ford government doesn’t have a plan or it has a secret plan. Neither option provides the slightest cause for confidence in this government, or its ability to tackle a problem with as many moving parts as health care… The Ford government should just get moving on the necessary retooling of health care to expand and better integrate home care, community supports and long-term beds to provide for Ontarians long before they get to a hospital hallway.

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The danger of two-tier medicine if Doug Ford’s top doc doesn’t seek informed consent first

Monday, February 4th, 2019

All that decentralization engendered duplication, as each LHIN and CCAC assembled its own bureaucracies and boards, leaving the available managerial talent stretched thin. It’s time to recalibrate and recentralize, breaking down barriers instead of creating yet more silos… If the Devlin-Decter duo is pondering a two-tier system for Ford, presumably they plan to be “transparent and accountable to the public” about it before delivering a fait accompli.

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Mental health is health care’s orphan

Saturday, February 2nd, 2019

The recent Health Accord between Canada and the provinces will invest $5-billion in mental-health services over 10 years, but spending will still be short of the annualized $3.1-billion investment that is required to reach the Mental Health Commission target of 9 per cent of health spending. 

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So-called ‘super agency’ not a magic cure for Ontario’s health-care woes

Friday, February 1st, 2019

All of these problems are well-known. The fixes for them are well-known, too. None of them involves merging all the province’s health-care agencies into one… If we want a super-agency to oversee all of health care, wouldn’t that be the health ministry? If the ministry doesn’t do that, what does it do? … Rather than waste time, money and energy on reshaping the health bureaucracy, the Ford government should move directly to specific solutions to well-identified problems.

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Premier’s Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine Releases First Report

Friday, February 1st, 2019

Hallway Health Care: A System Under Strain identifies three key findings: Difficulty navigating the health care system and long wait times… The system… does not have the appropriate mix of services, beds or digital tools to be ready for the expected increase in complex care needs. More effective coordination at the system level and at the point-of-care would make the system more efficient

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Ford shouldn’t mess with success of full-day kindergarten program

Thursday, January 31st, 2019

All the available evidence suggests the benefits of full-day kindergarten for kids, parents, employers and even the economy far outweigh any cost savings the government will be able to find by cutting this program… every dollar invested in the program will generate $2.42 for the province in reduced social costs and improved health outcomes. In other words, full-day kindergarten more than pays for itself.

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Improving OHIP+ for lower- and modest-income Ontarians

Wednesday, January 30th, 2019

The Ontario government’s proposed changes to OHIP+ indicate that families with private prescription drug coverage will be required to pay out-of-pocket for any costs not covered by their plans. This will have a burdensome impact on working families with low incomes.

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