Archive for the ‘Health Debates’ Category

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Pharmacare consultations should be transparent

Monday, July 30th, 2018

… pharmacare would save Canadians $4 billion annually because Health Canada would be able to negotiate for better drug prices in bulk. However, it will also come with an upfront cost of $20 billion, likely requiring higher taxes to foot the bill, which is why it is essential that leadership gets it right… The government should resist the temptation for making pharmacare a partisan issue and commit to adhering to its own inclusion and transparency framework it promised Canadians.

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Why Canada’s employers should back national pharmacare

Monday, July 23rd, 2018

Canadians could save $7.3-billion to $10.7-billion (42.8 per cent) a year under a national pharmacare system. The bulk of those savings would accrue to employers who currently pay for drug insurance as part of their employee health plans. Even if the government took back some of those savings via taxes to help cover the cost of pharmacare, the net effect would be a major competitive advantage for Canadian employers, much in the way medicare is.

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Health officials in B.C., Toronto call for widespread decriminalization of illicit drugs

Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

… compared with criminal charges, diversion programs can reduce criminal justice system costs and reduce adverse social and economic consequences for the individual. A 2008 study from Australia found that the majority of participants without prior offences did not commit further offences and those with prior offences had reduced rates for reoffending after participating in the program. Under decriminalization… it would remain illegal to manufacture, sell and distribute illicit drugs.

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‘No Jab, No Pay’. In Australia, no excuse accepted for unvaccinated kids

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

The financial penalty for non-vaccination is imposed principally on the poor – those who receive income-tested benefits – while it is wealthier parents who are most likely to eschew vaccination… But the majority of parents of unvaccinated and under-vaccinated kids are not dogmatic; they are overwhelmed, usually by monetary and logistical issues. What they need are not financial penalties, but practical help – carrots, not sticks.

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Doug Ford needs to rein in Ontario’s bureaucratic health-care mess

Tuesday, June 26th, 2018

… the Liberals carried out 15 significant restructuring exercises, centralizing and decentralizing and creating new layers of regional administration such as LHINs (local health integration networks) and CCACs (community care access centres), before settling on the current bloated structure of 14 LHINs (each of which has a CEO and six vice-presidents) and 78 sub-LHINs. (The CCACs were rolled into the LHINs after a damning Auditor-General’s report showing they spent almost 40 per cent of home-care dollars on administration.)

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Ontario Tories’ point man on health care wants more innovation

Monday, June 18th, 2018

the Progressive Conservative vision places an emphasis on: making more health care available outside of hospitals; improving integration as patients move from hospital to home and throughout the rest of the health system; increasing innovation and making better use of technology; and improving access to patient records… What distinguishes the Progressive Conservatives from other parties, Devlin said, is that they have the “political will to modernize our system by creating real integrated care.”

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A Prescription for Better Health for Canadians

Monday, June 18th, 2018

If you exercise, eat well, get good sleep and manage your stress, you are going to be healthier than if you didn’t do those things. The point is that across the population some people are much more likely, and able, to make those healthier choices than others are. There’s a need for public policy that doesn’t just tell people to make better choices, but that helps create the conditions and provide the resources that enable individuals to make those healthy choices.

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Overview of the Progressive Conservative Party’s Healthcare Platform

Sunday, June 10th, 2018

The party intends to spend $98 million annually to provide dental care to low-income seniors… in under-serviced areas… The party intends to increase the number of long-term care beds, with 15,000 new beds over the next five years… $1.9 billion over the next 10 years on mental health and addiction support… to reduce hospital overcrowding and improve wait times for care… [and] to increase autism funding to $100 million in the 2018-2019 fiscal year.

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Fixing Ontario’s health system will take more than campaign rhetoric

Saturday, May 19th, 2018

… hallway medicine… It seems to sum up so much that’s wrong with our health care system… this is not a new problem… And it won’t simply be swept away by electing a new one… The hospital, no matter how many beds there are, will always be the place people go when they have no other options. But that’s not good patient care and it’s not an option taxpayers can afford, especially with a growing and aging population.

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Should universities inform parents when their children have mental-health issues?

Wednesday, May 16th, 2018

College and university students are adults. They have a right to privacy. Parents are not entitled to see their children’s medical records any more than they are entitled to see their transcripts… When students exhibit concerning behaviour – such as they stop going to class, stop bathing, withdraw socially, engage in self-harm, start talking about suicide and so forth – alarm bells should go off, ideally triggered by professors, dormitory assistants and counsellors. And parents feel they have a right to know.

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