• Sears shows us the wisdom of defined-contribution pensions

    Critics of defined-contribution plans dislike the non-specific dollar amounts that would accrue to retirees – again, contributions plus investment returns determine eventual pension paycheques. But… defined-contribution plans are more realistic given they are linked with market returns. Also… defined-contribution plans belong to individual employees from the start.

  • Temp agencies on rise as province seeks to protect vulnerable workers

    It’s “like a huge warning bell to anyone who is concerned about (work) conditions and low wages and precariousness,” said Deena Ladd of the Toronto-based Workers’ Action Centre. “I think it’s a huge indication that corporations are shifting their responsibility to a third party for employment…” … “We seem to be growing into a society where agencies are proliferating, and these people are getting a little piece of everybody’s paycheques,” said Labour Minister Kevin Flynn

  • Bill 148 (The Fair Workplaces Better Jobs Act 2017)

    The Government needs to hear that the improvements to workers rights are widely supported in the community. We urge you to make a submission to the Committee supporting in principle Bill 148 while seeking further enhancements.

  • Oh! What a Lovely Trade War

    Rapid growth in globalization has hurt some American workers, and an import surge after 2000 disrupted industries and communities… globalization has already happened, and U.S. industries are now embedded in a web of international transactions. So a trade war would disrupt communities the same way that rising trade did in the past… Also, the tariffs now being proposed would boost capital-intensive industries that employ relatively few workers per dollar of sales… [and] further tilt the distribution of income against labor.

  • New Ontario legislation ensures workers can take at least 10 sick days a year without a doctor’s note

    Bosses will be banned from asking employees for sick notes if they take 10 or fewer days a year under proposed legislation that would take effect next January 1. The measure… means fewer wasted appointments for doctors and allows workers to stay home and get well instead of spreading their germs around… the law will ensure all workers are entitled to at least 10 personal emergency leave days annually — two of which must be paid.

  • How business also benefits from the Liberals’ latest labour reforms

    Our unemployment rate of 5.8 per cent can’t get much lower; our economic growth leads the country. These are boom times for employers; but also precarious times for many employees… The beneficiaries of these reforms will be precarious employees for whom unionization has long been a remote possibility, and for whom legal protections have recently become more theoretical than practical.

  • Kathleen Wynne shows there’s nothing inevitable about precarious labour

    In Ontario, about 22 per cent of workers are now employed in some form of precarious labour, many in low-wage, temporary jobs. In the GTA, that number is around 53 per cent. Yet as the traditional perks of full-time employment – predictable hours, benefits, pensions, even the guarantee of minimum wage – have become increasingly elusive, the province has failed until now to intervene.

  • Kathleen Wynne’s modest blueprint for attacking precarious work

    Precarious work makes life chaotic. It also contributes to income inequality. While the ultimate cause of precarious work lies in the globalized economy, governments can take mitigating measures to ease the pain… the report recommends that those allegedly self-employed persons who rely on one firm for their livelihood be granted all employee benefits… Some of the report’s recommendations, such as requiring employers to pay equivalent full- and part-time workers the same wage, reflect basic notions of fairness.

  • Electricity policy: What went wrong in Ontario

    There is no way of de-risking long-term projects. Political acceptability – mutable as it may be – is an essential planning requirement… Do lead the narrative on needs, alternatives, outcome. Do allow time for people to come to the right conclusion. Do offer choices. Do model solutions. Do make the right choice easy, safe and cheap as possible.

  • Innovations in Healthcare Should Focus More on Cost-Effectiveness

    Provincial governments, with support from Ottawa, should experiment with new models of provider payment that strengthen their incentive to adopt cost-effective drugs, treatment methods, and diagnostic tests… Patients should be empowered with information… Governments should also work on creating a system of Health Technology Assessment…