Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

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Drugs Other Than Cannabis Are Too Hazardous to Legalize

Saturday, December 1st, 2018

We need to spend at least a decade studying the impact of cannabis legalization on public health and society before considering additional action. Then, if the results from these studies give us reason to move forward, it would be crucial to examine… the potential harms each drug can cause to individuals, to those around them and to society. We’d need to consider the addiction potential of each drug, the acute effects of each drug and its chronic, long-term effects. We’d have to consider how likely people are to overdose from the drug.

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Canada Should Legalize All Recreational Drugs

Saturday, December 1st, 2018

We’ve spent billions of dollars to prosecute people for the possession of small amounts of drugs. 8 We’re doing our whole country a disservice. We’re locking away people’s talents and potential because we criminalize drug use.
Consider a society in which all drugs are legal; Under these conditions, the black market for drugs – and much of the associated violence, social harm and health risks – could be virtually eliminated… problematic use would actually decline, as would the negative consequences associated with criminalization.

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Let’s not forget that our medicare system was also born of war

Tuesday, November 13th, 2018

Canada alone operated 10 large hospitals in England and France to tend to its wounded, along with 10 stationary hospitals and four casualty clearing stations. Back home, the federal government also took control of 11 hospitals for the care of returning soldiers, and built the first state-run hospital… It also fuelled political debates about the need for a “national sickness plan,” to extend public health insurance beyond veterans.

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On safe injection sites, why can’t conservatives just let people not die?

Saturday, November 10th, 2018

Once conservatives get past the ideological hurdle of harm reduction, they ought to be impressed by its simplicity: Two volunteers in a tent with a bunch of naloxone kits and $200 in supplies from any pharmacy can provide the most basic service, which is ensuring that people do not die

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Ontario should stop stalling on making payments to doctors public

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

… it is so alarming that months after taking office the Ford government has yet to enact regulations that would bring into force the Health Sector Transparency Act passed by the previous Liberal government. It should quit stalling. The legislation would compel drug companies and those that manufacture medical devices to publicly report cash payments, free dinners, trips and other benefits they dole out to doctors, dentists and pharmacists.

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How do we balance rights in cases of medically assisted dying?

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

Catholic health-care facilities must recognize the vulnerabilities and full health-care needs of its diverse patient population. That means providing complete, compassionate and dignified end-of-life care, including MAID, especially when dealing with patients grappling with intolerable circumstances and imminent mortality.

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Bureaucracy should not stand in the way of a dignified death

Tuesday, November 6th, 2018

… under Canada’s MAiD rules, to be eligible a patient must have a “grievous and irremediable medical condition,” their death must be “reasonably foreseeable,” they must be capable of informed consent, they must have the approval of two independent physicians (or nurse-practitioners), make the request in writing in the presence of two witnesses, have an unofficial cooling-off period to be sure their decision is final and then give “late-stage consent” just prior to the injection of the drug cocktail that will hasten death.

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Minimum wage of $14 per hour bad for public health

Sunday, October 28th, 2018

Poverty is one of the best predictors of health. People making minimum wage earn less than $20,000 for a 40-hour week, and hover near the poverty line. They will live up to five fewer years than people who have higher wages, they will use more health and social services and their children will do less well at school and be at increased risk of illness themselves… Poverty and low wages decrease your life expectancy and increase the risk of cancer, heart disease, respiratory diseases, diabetes, accidents, and mental health and addiction problems

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Hatred of Big Pharma won’t get us better drug prices

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2018

Talking about the price of drugs is very 20th century; in the 21st century, and the impending era of personalized medicine, what matters is the value treatments provide. For drugs such as Remicade, we should be paying, and paying fairly, when the drug works, when it delivers on a specific treatment goal.

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How a blockbuster drug tells the story of why Canada’s spending on prescriptions is sky high

Monday, October 22nd, 2018

Canada pays the third-highest drug prices among the countries in the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, and spends more per capita on prescriptions than any country except the United States and Switzerland… Like generic drugs before them, biosimilars could free up money for governments and private insurers to cover the newest generation of miracle cures, including expensive gene therapies

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