Archive for the ‘Health’ Category

« Older Entries | Newer Entries »

Is it too late to reconsider Ontario’s new health care super agency?

Thursday, February 28th, 2019

… the government will create a super agency called Ontario Health, which will become the single point of accountability for all health services in the province… It seems our ministry is forecasting several years of turgid inertia while Ontario Health and Ontario Health Teams organize their new structures… Massive new bureaucracy, maintenance of old bureaucracy and a low rules environment where we will design the future of Ontario health systems “on the fly.”

Tags: , , , ,
Posted in Health Delivery System | No Comments »


Patients lose out in Ford’s health-care ‘reform’

Thursday, February 28th, 2019

… Ontario faces years of chaos and turmoil as the entire health-care system adjusts to yet another in a long line of bureaucratic transformations… fixing hospital overcrowding doesn’t require a super agency; it requires more money for hospital and long-term care beds… The current mess in home care is the result of inadequate funding and the availability of personal support workers and other professionals… Third, there’s no move to increase access to a family doctor for patients currently without one…

Tags: , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


Ontario’s new plan for health care echoes past prescriptions

Thursday, February 28th, 2019

Elliott is now promising “transformation” of the system. She will deliver “patient-centred care.” And she intends to move people through a “siloed” system “seamlessly.” That’s precisely the wording used by the previous Liberal health minister, Dr. Eric Hoskins… Connectivity can be a good thing but it is not a sure thing — it can’t conjure up co-ordination, efficiencies and extra beds on demand. Buzzwords are not benchmarks… the question is whether these reforms are truly transformational or merely aspirational.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Health History | No Comments »


Pills can help people control risky drinking, so why aren’t doctors prescribing them?

Thursday, February 28th, 2019

A recent study found that fewer than 1% of Ontario adults with an alcohol use disorder is ever prescribed a drug that can help them drink less, and less often… Pills don’t address the underlying issues that drive some people to drink, like childhood trauma, anxiety and depression. And, in cases where people are facing massive social or legal problems, people with explosive drinking patterns whose livers are giving out, “for sure it’s better to have the goal of abstinence”… But for others, “these medications potentially can help a wide range of people get back some of the control they have lost”

Tags: , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Doug Ford’s health care ‘super agency’ is a solution in search of a problem

Wednesday, February 27th, 2019

a recent Conference Board of Canada comparative assessment of the provincial health systems ranked Ontario as the second-best performer in the country, behind only B.C. As is true with the analysis from the Ford government on a host of issues, the real story is more complex than they are letting on, and the fix is missing the bigger set of issues at stake, namely how to create an effective and responsive health care system.

Tags: , , , , ,
Posted in Health Delivery System | No Comments »


New Ontario Health agency would overhaul ‘disconnected’ medical system, minister says

Wednesday, February 27th, 2019

The promise to make a complicated system easier for patients to navigate came with the acknowledgement from Elliott and senior officials that the “transformation” will take at least three years — coinciding with the next provincial election — and with many details yet to be worked out… she announced between 30 and 50 “Ontario Health Teams” will form across the province to better co-ordinate all levels of care. Each will serve about 300,000 people in a geographic area or a specific group of patients across the province, such as children with fragile medical conditions.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Health Delivery System | No Comments »


Doctors get new contract with province after 4-year battle

Wednesday, February 20th, 2019

… the board ordered that the two sides strike an “appropriateness working group” to eliminate or restrict inappropriate or overused physician services — $100 million worth in 2019-20 and another $360 million worth the following year… The arbitration decision provides doctors with redress, eliminating most but not all of the fee cuts imposed by the province in recent years, effective this coming April. As well, it awards physicians with increases of 0.75 per cent for 2017; 1.25 per cent for 2018; 1 per cent for 2019; and 1 per cent for 2020.

Tags: , , ,
Posted in Health Delivery System | No Comments »


Lab Testing Misuse Costs Billions

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

“Reducing inappropriate use requires careful considerations of the trade-off between the effectiveness of interventions and their acceptability to physicians,” said Rosalie Wyonch. “Incorporating laboratory services in physician compensation formulas would be an effective tool to discourage unnecessary lab tests.” …  The report proposes a number of options for policymakers to reduce inappropriate laboratory testing:

Tags: ,
Posted in Health Delivery System | No Comments »


Ontario’s looming health care reforms are being rushed through to limit public scrutiny, critics say

Tuesday, February 12th, 2019

TheStar.com Politics/Provincial Politics Feb. 11, 2019.   By ROB FERGUSON, Queen’s Park Bureau The Ford government’s looming health-care system “transformation” is being rushed through with little explanation to limit scrutiny by the public, the Ontario Health Coalition charges. Citing confidential draft legislation and other documents leaked to the New Democrats indicating elements of the plan — […]

Tags: , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Debates | No Comments »


Charting the Path to National Pharmacare in Canada

Tuesday, February 5th, 2019

… a federally financed, regulated and administered pharmacare program… is constitutionally feasible because of the federal government’s current jurisdiction over drug safety, price regulation and patent protection. While it is generally assumed that federalism and provincial jurisdiction over health stand in the way of a federal government public single payer program, the provinces have supported this option in the past, with the caveat that special arrangements may have to be made for Quebec.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Health Policy Context | No Comments »


« Older Entries | Newer Entries »