Archive for the ‘Governance’ Category

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Ontario wants to pool public sector benefits, potentially saving millions

Wednesday, October 9th, 2019

… some pooling exists now, but the new plan would end the current patchwork system. The new system is being targeted at the health care sector, as well as colleges and universities… The move is part of the government’s focus on public sector compensation, which represents $72 billion, about one half of government spending.

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The same old stories: How the narratives around Canada’s political parties become pathology

Sunday, October 6th, 2019

Parties and their leaders are encumbered and shaped by their histories and internal and external expectations. Even if there have been some unexpected twists at times, each occupies a distinct space in the Canadian political system. And each is prone to following its past patterns and pathologies.

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Reversing cuts is just the start of what the Ford government needs to do

Friday, October 4th, 2019

Ontario’s social assistance system keeps nearly one million people living in abject poverty. It offers far too few pathways out of it. And the government has not reversed some of its other changes that have made decent low-skill jobs even harder to find. Ford kept Ontario’s minimum wage from rising to $15 an hour, as it was scheduled to do, and rolled back labour reforms designed to improve the lot of workers who need the most protection.

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Scheer is wrong to turn back the clock on Senate reform

Thursday, October 3rd, 2019

Scheer apparently prefers straight-up political patronage and says he’ll appoint Conservative senators “who would help implement a Conservative vision for Canada.” No sober second thought there. Just rubber-stamping and, no doubt, more of the embarrassing antics that long made the Senate one of the most reviled institutions in Canada.

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Don’t Fret over Deficits and Debt

Thursday, September 26th, 2019

In 2017-18, federal program spending was 14.5% of GDP—an increase of 1.6 percentage points from 2015, but still shy of postwar levels — and slated to fall to 13.8% by 2023-24. On the other side of the ledger, federal revenues are also near all-time lows relative to GDP. Revenues as a share of GDP, at 14.5%, are two percentage points lower than the 50-year average of 16.4%, representing an annual loss of more than $40 billion.

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The major federal parties are promising a stampede of tax giveaways, with no policy plan

Wednesday, September 25th, 2019

… Canada is operating with an antiquated tax system that was devised in the 1960s and implemented (decidedly imperfectly) in the early 1970s. It was built for a Canadian economy that isn’t even recognizable any more, in a global economic landscape that is utterly transformed… It needs a massive rebuild… rethought from the bottom up, if it is to be a catalyst for Canadian competitiveness this century rather than an impediment.

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How do you tell a Conservative from a Liberal? Ask an economist

Friday, September 20th, 2019

Where once the party stood for bold, broad tax reform, it now confines itself to a clutch of micro-targeted “boutique” tax credits, such as for children’s fitness or transit passes: spending programs by another name, of precisely the sort of busy-bodying, social-engineering bent that Conservatives used to disdain, and not very effective even at that.

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The debt, the deficit – and other things this election isn’t about

Thursday, September 19th, 2019

Canada has the lowest debt burden in the Group of Seven. The weight of federal debt is not heavy and increasing; it’s light and shrinking…. Relative to a $2.3-trillion economy, deficits of roughly $20-billion or less are small enough that the federal debt-to-GDP ratio will continue to steadily fall… Ottawa’s tax take today is smaller than at any other time in recent history…

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Will the Liberals’ Broken Electoral Reform Promise Hurt Them?

Monday, September 16th, 2019

It was a “loud minority” who wanted electoral reform… Liberals are unlikely to revisit the issue and remind Canadian voters of that reversal. “The problem with electoral reform for the Liberals is that there is really no reward for doing it,” Bricker said. “What it does is promote opportunities for parties like the Greens and the NDP to do better.”

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Make no mistake: elections do make a difference

Saturday, September 14th, 2019

… four big areas: Technology and the nature of work… Achieving some kind of stability amid the storm requires innovative approaches to education, training and social programs / Sharing the benefits of prosperity… individuals, indeed entire sectors of the new economy, aren’t paying their share / … alliances… As a trading nation, that’s of vital concern to Canada. Jobs are at stake. / Climate change and energy…

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