• Act now on Indigenous youth suicide crisis

    A Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruled last year that the federal government discriminates against First Nations children on reserves. Even though needs are greater, Ottawa provides significantly less support to children on reserves – for which it is responsible – than provinces do for Indigenous children living off-reserve… The ruling was particularly troubling given the adoption of Jordan’s Principle… that stipulates no Indigenous child should suffer denials, delays or disruptions in health services due to jurisdictional disputes.

  • This report just shredded every myth claiming Canadian medicare is superior — or fair

    When measuring the equity of our system against the others, we come a pitiful ninth out of 11… Despite being a fairly high spender, we are not able to turn that money into better outcomes for Canadians. Again, we rank ninth out of 11. But in what must be the bitterest pill, we come 10th in access… it is the defenders of the status quo who are denying Canadians the kind of experimentation and reform that provide superior equity and outcomes in our peer countries every day.

  • To understand U.S. health care, think like an American

    Canada spends roughly half as much as the United States on health care, yet has comparable or better outcomes on most health barometers… The widely accepted view that more care is not necessarily better care has yet to penetrate the American psyche. Those with good insurance use it to the max. Doctors and hospitals are complicit in this overconsumption, treating the well-insured as cash cows.

  • Canada should listen to wake-up call on health care

    … according to the data, access to health care could be greatly improved if we had more doctors. Among the 11 advanced countries, Canada has the fewest doctors per 1,000 residents. In 2014, we had 2.5 doctors for every thousand people. Norway had 4.4 and the U.S. was only slightly better than Canada, with 2.6… the government has successfully controlled spending on doctors’ services, but it comes at a cost.

  • Dental care is a right – not a luxury

    … dental problems can develop into gum disease, serious infection and oral cancers. Some dentists… recognize the serious nature of these issues, but go on to attribute them solely to the individual and their poor choices… Despite being recognized as a key component of health care, dental care is still administered as if it is an unnecessary cosmetic procedure; privately funded and excluded from medicare. This is not the case in other countries

  • PET brain scans show many Alzheimer’s patients may not actually have the disease

    A significant portion of people with mild cognitive impairment or dementia who are taking medication for Alzheimer’s may not actually have the disease… The findings could change the way doctors treat people in these hard-to-diagnose groups and save money currently being spent on inappropriate medication… “we’re getting a 66 per cent change… of people who are on a drug and didn’t need to be on those drugs.”

  • Canada committed to improving mental health in Indigenous communities

    Preventing suicide requires achieving social equity. We have already taken important steps by investing in key social determinants of health, such as housing, education and the environment. While these are first steps, our intent is to continue investing in all areas in pursuit of social equity… Promoting life and preventing suicide requires respect for Indigenous knowledge and practices…

  • Poor health-care ranking a sign our system needs fixing

    What may surprise many is that Canada ranks so poorly (nine of 11) in what are arguably the two most critical areas, health outcomes and equity… The problem is that Canada does not cover a broad enough range of services. Medicare covers 100 per cent of hospital and physician services, but too often fails to cover essential prescription drugs, home care, long-term care and dental care, which is the norm in most wealthy countries.

  • Covering drugs for young people isn’t the best way to fill gaps in health care

    In an international health survey, about 11 per cent of Ontarians said they may not fill a drug prescription due to cost, but roughly three times that many say they skip dental services for that reason. Further, far too many young people end up in emergency rooms for severe mental health issues; others walk around with improper prescription eyeglasses or rely heavily on family caregivers for home support.

  • Makers of OxyContin, Percocet sued by U.S. governments over opioid crisis

    Their suit is part of a wave of litigation against pharmaceutical companies by states, counties and local prosecutors besieged by the worst addiction crisis in American history… Opioid overdoses killed 33,000 people in the U.S. in 2015, about three times the number of gun homicides. The intensity of the crisis, and likely the fact that many of the victims are white middle-class suburbanites with political clout, has produced a bipartisan shift in perceptions of addiction.