• Think education in Ontario doesn’t need to be protected as a human right? Think again

    If you have access to education, you are more likely to know your rights, and know how to advocate for yourself and for others… By framing education as a fundamental human right, we place the emphasis on education for all without discrimination; the obligation of states to protect, respect and fulfil this right; and the need for accountability mechanisms when people cannot realize their right.

  • It’s time to merge Ontario’s two school systems

    Consolidation of school systems will save money by eliminating service duplication, and it will eradicate enrolment competition between the two systems. And contrary to a widely held perception, denominational schools are not necessarily protected by Canada’s Constitution, as previously demonstrated in the provinces of Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Québec.

  • Addressing poverty, not policing, is solution to gun violence

    Providing opportunities, programs and social supports for daycare aged children as young as two, all the way through to assisting youth to pursue post-secondary education, it is resources rather than enforcement that go a long way to address poverty… Decades of research… all highlight the need to support and not punish our communities.

  • ‘No Jab, No Pay’. In Australia, no excuse accepted for unvaccinated kids

    The financial penalty for non-vaccination is imposed principally on the poor – those who receive income-tested benefits – while it is wealthier parents who are most likely to eschew vaccination… But the majority of parents of unvaccinated and under-vaccinated kids are not dogmatic; they are overwhelmed, usually by monetary and logistical issues. What they need are not financial penalties, but practical help – carrots, not sticks.

  • Education reform must be on the table in Ontario

    In 2018-19, Ontario will spend $29.1 billion on K-12 education, representing one-fifth of all program spending in the province… That places Ontario third in per student spending among the provinces, behind only Alberta and Saskatchewan, and more than 20% higher than neighbouring Quebec… Many Ontarians are likely unaware of how unique Ontario’s K-12 education system is compared to the other provinces. Ontario is one of only three provinces that deliver religious education

  • As gun violence spikes, Toronto faces a reckoning on the root causes of tragedy

    “The feeling of disadvantage and unfairness leads the poor to seek compensation and satisfaction by all means, including committing crimes… These kids feel a sense of social isolation. They don’t feel part of anything,” … There’s growing consensus that gun and gang violence is not a problem the city can arrest its way out of.

  • New Report Shows Child Poverty in Canada Knows no Boundaries

    … over 1.2 million children, or 17.4%, are living in poverty with their families. That’s the finding from Campaign 2000’s riding by riding analysis of child poverty in Canada, released June 18th, 2018… Significant child poverty exists in every one of Canada’s 338 ridings. It brings to light the disparities that exist in ridings home to both extreme wealth and deep poverty. One such example is the riding of Toronto Centre [where]… Four out of ten (40%) children live in poverty…

  • How We All Can Help Improve Indigenous Child Welfare Today

    … while we’re doing the hard work of implementing a new way of doing Indigenous child welfare, what could be done right now to help Indigenous families and kids in the current system? … offer Indigenous control, seek prevention, stop taking kids into care altogether… But other actions, some big and some small, don’t just need government to move forward. They need the buy-in, co-operation and good faith effort from everyone in Canada.

  • Good Intentions, Not Enough Action in Indigenous Child Welfare Plan, Says Advocate

    … many of the prevention programs the government is now pledging to fund don’t currently exist. Additional funding will be needed for capital and start-up costs for new programming to keep kids with their families… “It’s taken us literally generations to get into the circumstances that have led to a severe overrepresentation of Indigenous children in child welfare… So it’s not going to happen overnight, but we’re seeing really positive movement…”

  • MMIWG inquiry gets six-month deadline extension to finish its work

    … the extension will ensure more people can share their experiences with the inquiry, while still “underscoring the urgency” of its final report… extra money will depend on staffing and other costs that the inquiry will identify… The due date for the inquiry’s final report — meant to probe the “systemic causes” of violence against Indigenous women and girls and make recommendations to the government to address them — is now April 30, 2019.