• Ottawa aims to continue anti-poverty measures in 2018

    Further moves aimed at low-income Canadians are expected to be announced soon as part of a new, multibillion-dollar national housing strategy… Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, Jean-Yves Duclos, suggested that more anti-poverty measures could be announced in the 2018 budget… “However, the poverty-reduction strategy itself will be announced after Budget 2018″

  • School vouchers don’t improve educational outcomes. Elitist parents may be the culprits

    … the quality of the pedagogy isn’t the only thing that shapes student outcomes in schools. The peer group matters a great deal; families with higher socioeconomic status are better able to navigate the educational system, and they value education very highly, traits they pass on to their children. Those parents also work hard to improve the quality of the schools their children attend.

  • Caledon praises federal Economic Statement

    As a non-stigmatizing, inclusive program, the Canada Child Benefit delivers its benefits to all eligible families through the same vehicle, the personal income tax. It is portable, providing a stable and assured supplement to income no matter where families live or move. It is progressive, meaning benefits decline as incomes rise. What you see is what you get because benefits are not subject to income tax. The program pays the same amount to all families with the same income, regardless of the source of that income, where they live or family type.

  • Government should expand student placements into social sector

    If the government expanded the new $73 million Student Work-Integrated Learning program to all students it could help tackle Canada’s most intractable social problems — such as homelessness, reconciliation with Indigenous peoples, affordable housing, social cohesion and intercultural understanding… most CSL [community service-learning] students and community partners are excluded from government support under the program.

  • Historical redress for the Sixties Scoop

    … the $800-million agreement represents meagre compensation for the trauma suffered by aboriginal children who were ripped from their families… It is a worthwhile and significant gesture nonetheless, and a tangible attempt at rectifying a deep historical wrong… Minister Carolyn Bennett happens to agree that aboriginal child welfare, a shared jurisdiction, needs an overhaul… Money has been added in the system, and Ms. Bennett says she wants more of it to go to families and children.

  • Ottawa is right to settle with Sixties Scoop victims

    Not only was the past program shameful, so was the government’s continuing defence of it. Now Ottawa has taken two other steps that should help in the healing process… $50 million for a new Indigenous Healing Foundation to help the victims reclaim their identity… $75 million to pay the legal fees of the estimated 20,000 victims who are expected to receive $25,000 to $50,000 each… Now… it should set its sights on correcting other ongoing wrongs to Indigenous children.

  • Students are not fragile flowers – we must care about their mental health

    The Canadian Mental Health Association ‘s #b4stage4 campaign asks a thought-provoking question: What if we waited until Stage 4 to treat cancer? … We would never allow our medical system to wait that long to treat this disease. We fully expect to have preventive education, screening and early treatment. Now, imagine if the standard of treatment was equal for mental and physical health conditions.

  • Give First Nations children an equal chance

    First Nations children are uniquely affected by federal underfunding of services on-reserve… Your government has spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on litigation to resist full implementation of the tribunal’s decisions – a move that is incompatible with your pledged support for a new partnership with First Nations, and all Indigenous people in Canada and their governments… We are asking you to implement the tribunal’s decisions immediately…

  • Why millennials are lapping up every tweet and podcast from 94-year-old agitator Harry Leslie Smith

    Smith preaches about preserving democracy and the welfare state, creating a just society and living a life of compassion… he isn’t a politician or political theorist, instead he “speaks from experience in his bones” and delivers life lessons “with moral clarity.” Smith’s message — about how they should expect fair wages, pensions and workplace benefits — is not one that today’s younger generation is accustomed to hearing.

  • Canadian incomes jump, Ontario residents hit by manufacturing downturn: Statistics Canada

    Canadian incomes have risen by more than 10 per cent over the last decade, fuelled by a booming resource sector, while the number living on low incomes is rising in Ontario where growth has been sluggish, Statistics Canada says… the downturn in the manufacturing sector slowed income growth and the proportion of low-income residents has been on the rise… Across Ontario, 14.4 per cent of residents — some 1.9 million people — were low income in 2015, an increase from 12.9 per cent in 2005.